Lecture: Gorodetsky, Soviet Involvement in the Creation of State of Israel (NYU; Feb 25, 2016)

Gorodetsky

“Soviet Involvement in the Creation of the State of Israel: The Secret Diaries of Ivan Maisky, Stalin’s Wartime Ambassador in London”

Prof. Gabriel Gorodetsky

All Souls College, Oxford

2/25/16 – 6pm
5 Washington Place, Room 101

About the Speaker:
Gabriel Gorodetsky is a Quondam Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford, and emeritus professor of history at Tel Aviv University. In 2010 he received an Honorary Doctorate from the Russian State University for the Humanities. He was the founder and director of the Cummings Center for Russian Studies at Tel Aviv University. Prof Gorodetsky has been a visiting fellow of St. Antony’s College, Oxford, the Wilson Center, Washington DC, the Rockefeller Bellagio Research Center and the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton. He has published widely on Soviet foreign policy in the interwar period and the Second World War. Among his leading publications are The Precarious Truce: Anglo-Soviet Relations, 1924-1927, Stafford Cripps’ Mission to Moscow, 1940-1942, Mif ledolkola published in Moscow in 1995, and Grand Delusion: Stalin and the German Invasion of Russia, published also in French, German, Russian and Hebrew.

New Book: Epstein, The Dream of Zion

Epstein, Lawrence J. The Dream of Zion. The Story of the First Zionist Congress. Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield, 2016.

 
Dream of Zion
 

The Dream of Zion tells the story of the Jewish political effort to restore their ancient nation. At the First Zionist Congress in Basel, Switzerland, in August 1897 Theodor Herzl convened a remarkable meeting that founded what became the World Zionist Organization, defined the political goals of the movement, adopted a national anthem, created the legal and financial instruments that would lead to statehood, and ushered the reentry of the Jewish people into political history. It was there in Basel that Herzl, the man some praised and some mocked as the new Moses, became the leader. The book provides an overview of the history that led to the Congress, an introduction to key figures in Israeli history, a discussion of the climate at the time for Jews—including the pogroms in Russia—and a discussion of themes that remain relevant today, such as the Christian reaction to the Zionist idea.

 

Table of Contents

The Birth of Zionism
2.The Sad-Eyed Prophet: Theodor Herzl’s Mission
3.With Eyes Toward Zion: The Many Routes to Basel
4.Trembling Before History: The Three Days of the Congress
5.Zion’s Flame: Reactions Around the World
6.Echoes of the Dream: The Legacy of the First Zionist Congress
Chronology
References
Index

LAWRENCE J. EPSTEIN is professor emeritus at Suffolk County Community College, where he taught courses on Jewish thought and culture. He served as Adviser on the Middle East for two members of the United States Congress. He is the author of numerous books, including The Basic Beliefs of Judaism and Conversion to Judaism: A Guidebook.

New in Hebrew: Webman and Litvak, From Empathy to Denial

Webman, Esther, and Meir Litvak. From Empathy to Denial. Responses to the Holocaust in the Arab World. Jerusalem: Magnes, 2015 (in Hebrew).

 

from empathy to denial

 

This book is a comprehensive and rigorous study, the first of its kind, presenting a wide range of responses to the Holocaust in the Arab world. The authors examine the evolution of representations of the Holocaust in Arabic through newspapers, literature, cinema, television and the internet. By analyzing case studies and trends over a period spanning seventy years – from the end of World War II and the founding of the State of Israel down to present day – the authors show how attitudes toward the Holocaust were formed in the shadow of the Arab-Israeli conflict and thus integrated into broad systems of anti-Zionist and antisemitic discourse.
The English edition (2009) of the book won the Washington Institute Book Prize in 2010

 

 

New Book: Patrick, America’s Forgotten Middle East Initiative

Patrick, Andrew. America’s Forgotten Middle East Initiative: The King-Crane Commission of 1919. London: Tauris, 2015.

king crane

 

Sent to the Middle East by Woodrow Wilson to ascertain the viability of self-determination in the disintegrating Ottoman Empire, the King-Crane Commission of 1919 was America’s first foray into the region. The commission’s controversial recommendations included the rejection of the idea of a Jewish state in Syria, US intervention in the Middle East and the end of French colonial aspirations. The Commission’s recommendations proved inflammatory, even though its counsel on the question of the Palestinian mandate was eventually disregarded by Lloyd George and Georges Clemenceau in favour of their own national interests. In the ensuing years, the Commission’s dismissal of claims by Zionist representatives like David Ben-Gurion on their ‘right to Palestine’ proved particularly divisive, with some historians labeling it prophetic and accurate, and others arguing that Commission members were biased and ill-informed. Here, in the first book-length analysis of the King-Crane report in nearly 50 years, Andrew Patrick chronicles the history of early US involvement in the region, and challenges extant interpretations of the turbulent relationship between the United States and the Middle East.

 

 

New Article: Alroey, The Idea of a Jewish State in Western Africa, 1907-1913

Alroey, Gur. “Angolan Zion. The Jewish Territorial Organization and the idea of a Jewish state in Western Africa, 1907–1913.” Journal of Modern Jewish Studies 14.2 (2015): 179-98.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14725886.2015.1006009

 

Abstract

This article traces the attempts in 1907–1913 by the Jewish Territorial Organization to set up an autonomous Jewish entity in West Africa. The Territorialists laid down three criteria for the choice of a territory: (1) A tract of land that must be large enough in size to allow for the absorption of mass Jewish migration. (2) A fertile territory that could provide a livelihood for the Jews who went there. (3) A sparsely populated territory so that no ethnic tensions would be created between the Jews settling there and the local residents. One likely territory was Angola, which at the beginning of the twentieth century was under the protection of the Portuguese government. The plan failed. However, the importance of the “Angola Plan” was to highlight the position of the Territorialists towards Africa in general and Angola in particular.

 

New Book: Rovner, In the Shadow of Zion

Rovner, Adam L. In the Shadow of Zion. Promised Lands before Israel. New York: New York University Press, 2014.

9781479817481_Full

URL: http://nyupress.org/books/9781479817481/

 

Table of Contents (click for PDF)

Preface

Introduction: They Say There Is a Land . . .

  1. Noah’s Ark on the Niagara: Grand Island, New York (1818–1848)
  2. Greetings from the Promised Land: Uasin Gishu, East Africa (1903–1905)
  3. Angolan Zion: Benguela Plateau (1907–1914)
  4. The Lost Jewish Continent: Madagascar (1933–1942)
  5. New Jerusalem, Down Under: Port Davey, Tasmania (1940–1945)
  6. Welcome to the Jungle: Suriname (1938–1948)

Epilogue: Go to Uganda

Acknowledgments

Notes

Bibliography

Index

About the Author

 

Abstract

From the late nineteenth century through the post-Holocaust era, the world was divided between countries that tried to expel their Jewish populations and those that refused to let them in. The plight of these traumatized refugees inspired numerous proposals for Jewish states. Jews and Christians, authors and adventurers, politicians and playwrights, and rabbis and revolutionaries all worked to carve out autonomous Jewish territories in remote and often hostile locations across the globe. The would-be founding fathers of these imaginary Zions dispatched scientific expeditions to far-flung regions and filed reports on the dream states they planned to create. But only Israel emerged from dream to reality. Israel’s successful foundation has long obscured the fact that eminent Jewish figures, including Zionism’s prophet, Theodor Herzl, seriously considered establishing enclaves beyond the Middle East.
In the Shadow of Zion brings to life the amazing true stories of six exotic visions of a Jewish national home outside of the biblical land of Israel. It is the only book to detail the connections between these schemes, which in turn explain the trajectory of modern Zionism. A gripping narrative drawn from archives the world over, In the Shadow of Zion recovers the mostly forgotten history of the Jewish territorialist movement, and the stories of the fascinating but now obscure figures who championed it.
Provocative, thoroughly researched, and written to appeal to a broad audience, In the Shadow of Zion offers a timely perspective on Jewish power and powerlessness.

 

 

Visit the author’s website: http://www.adamrovner.com/

Reviews: Campos, Ottoman Brothers

Campos, Michelle U. Ottoman Brothers. Muslims, Christians, and Jews in Early Twentieth-Century Palestine. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2011.

 

 

cover for Ottoman Brothers

 

 

Reviews

 

  • Jacobson, Abigail. “Review.” Journal of Levantine Studies 1.2 (2011).
  • Norris, Jacob. “Review.” Historical Journal 55.1 (2012): 277-278.
  • Baer, Marc David. “Review.” American Historical Review 117.1 (2012): 305.
  • Robson, Laura. “Review.” International Journal of Middle East Studies 44.2 (2012): 355-357.

Cite: Cohen, Was the Balfour Declaration at Risk in 1923?

Cohen, Michael J. "Was the Balfour Declaration at Risk in 1923? Zionism and British Imperialism." Journal of Israeli History 29,1 (2010): 79-98.

Abstract

This article examines the nature of the British government’s commitment to the Balfour Declaration after World War I. It refutes the hypothesis that in 1923 the Conservative government was on the brink of abrogating the Balfour Declaration. After the war, the Declaration became Britain’s international license for her exclusive rule over Palestine. Palestine was not written off as an imperial asset but remained a vital British strategic interest. In addition, considerations of financing the administration of the country, and concern for her international standing, should she renege on her wartime pledge to the Zionists, ensured that Britain would continue to adhere to the Balfour Declaration. An understanding of the issues at stake in 1923 is essential for any comprehension of Britain’s 30-year-long control of Palestine.

URL: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=all~content=a919915763

Keywords: Balfour Declaration; British imperialism; British Mandate; Lord Curzon; Palestine; Suez Canal; Winston Churchill; History, Colonialism / Imperialism, Zionism: and World Powers

Reviews: Litvak and Webman, From Empathy to Denial

Meir Litvak and Esther Webman. From Empathy to Denial. Arab Responses to the Holocaust. New York: Columbia University Press, 2009.

———

Reviews:

– Daniel H. Magilow. Journal of Jewish Identities 3,1 (2010): 86-88.

– Robert Melson. Holocaust and Genocide Studies 24,3 (2010): 468-474.

– Hilal Knashan. Shofar. 28,4 (2010): 157-160.

Patten, Howard A. Israel Affairs 17.4 (2011): 663-665.

————

Keywords: Israeli-Arab Conflict, Propoganda, Holocaust: Denial, Zionism: and World Powers, Zionism: Relation to Arabs, Nakbah, Holocaust: Eichmann Trial, Equation of Zionism to Nazism

New Publication: Litvak and Webman, From Empathy to Denial

Meir Litvak and Esther Webman. From Empathy to Denial. Arab Responses to the Holocaust. New York: Columbia University Press, 2009.

from empathy

 

Keywords: Israeli-Arab Conflict, Propoganda, Holocaust: Denial, Zionism: and World Powers, Zionism: Relation to Arabs, Nakbah, Holocaust: Eichmann Trial, Equation of Zionism to Nazism