ToC: Melilah: Manchester Journal of Jewish Studies Volume 10 (2013)

Melilah: Manchester Journal of Jewish Studies Volume 10 (2013), Israel Studies theme www.melilahjournal.org/p/2013.html

Open Access, freely available online.

Editors: Daniel R. Langton and Renate Smithuis

Contents

1. Daniel Langton, Abraham Isaac Kook’s Account of ‘Creative Evolution’: A Response to Modernity for the Sake of Zion

The Chief Rabbi of Israel and religious Zionist Abraham I. Kook is well known for having written about evolution. His mystical interpretation of the theory is often presented as a synthetic or complementary model that effectively offered a defence of Judaism in the context of the religion-science debate. But this is not the only context in which one might consider his views on the topic. From a political perspective, one might note his interest in the influence of Darwinism in the thought of secular Jews. And if one gives due weight to his appreciation of secular Zionists’ work in building up the Land and combines this with his earlier, often overlooked writings on evolution in which the mystical dimension is missing, then it is possible to suggest that his engagement with evolutionary theory reflected as much a political concern to build bridges between religious and non-religious Zionists as it expressed a theological defence of traditional Judaism against the challenges of modern science.  

 

2. Simon Mayers, Zionism and Anti-Zionism in the Catholic Guild of Israel:

Bede Jarrett, Arthur Day and Hans Herzl

This article examines Zionism and Anti-Zionism in the discourse of key members of the Catholic Guild of Israel, an English Catholic movement for the conversion of the Jews. The central theme in the discourse of the Guild was Jewish ‘power’.It was argued that the Jews had great vitality, zeal and energy, which made them dangerous outside of the Church, but an asset if they could be brought into it. This idea was disseminated by Bede Jarrett and Arthur Day, the two most senior and prolific members of the Guild. Their notions of Jewish power influenced their views about Jews and Zionism. They both saw Jewish power and Zionism as a threat and opportunity, but Jarrett placed the emphasis on threat, whilst Day placed the emphasis on opportunity. One prominent member of the Guild who did not gravitate to their views was Hans Herzl, a convert to Catholicism and the son of the Zionist leader, Theodor Herzl. On the surface Hans adopted the anti-Zionism of Jarrett. Unlike Jarrett, however, Hans believed in Jewish nationalism, although he interpreted it as a spiritual rather than political movement. His ideal Jewish nation was a ‘Christian theocracy of Jewish faith’ with the Pope as sovereign and protector. 

 

3. Roman Vater, Down with Britain, away with Zionism: the ‘Canaanites’ and ‘Lohamey Herut Israel’ between two adversaries

The imposition of the British Mandate over Palestine in 1922 put the Zionist leadership between a rock and a hard place, between its declared allegiance to the idea of Jewish sovereignty and the necessity of cooperation with a foreign ruler. Eventually, both Labour and Revisionist Zionism accommodated themselves to the new situation and chose a strategic partnership with the British Empire. However, dissident opinions within the Revisionist movement were voiced by a group known as the Maximalist Revisionists from the early 1930s. This article analyzes the intellectual and political development of two Maximalist Revisionists – Yonatan Ratosh and Israel Eldad – tracing their gradual shift to anti-Zionist positions. Some questions raised include: when does opposition to Zionist politics transform into opposition to Zionist ideology, and what are the implications of such a transition for the Israeli political scene after 1948?

 

4. Dvir Abramovich, Breaking Taboos in Israeli Holocaust Literature

This article focuses on the phenomenon of second-generation Israeli Holocaust literature, also known as ‘bearing witness’ fiction, that appeared with great resonance on the Hebrew literary scene in the 1980s. It argues that this new band of writers overcame the dual moral obstacles of describing a reality that they did not directly experience and making art of a subject that defies human comprehension. The article focuses on one particularly important novel, Agadat Ha-agamim Ha-atzuvim (The Legend of the Sad Lakes) by Itamar Levy, which tested the limits of representation of the Holocaust and provoked intense debate about its graphic and violent scenes of Jews tortured by the Nazis as well as about its postmodern techniques in portraying the Holocaust experience. The article maintains that despite the fact that Agadat Ha-agamim Ha-atzuvimbroke taboos in Israeli Holocaust literature with its disturbing, and perhaps sensational sequences, that at heart Levy’s narrative presents a profound confrontation with the anguished past that affords young readers the necessary gateway to engage with the Holocaust on an individual, rather than a public level. The article makes the case that novels such as Agadat Ha-agamim Ha-atzuvimrepresent deeply veined journeys into the heart of the Nazi beast, by Israeli writers who are propelled by a wish to unshackle the Shoah from the fetters of the collective and reclaim it as a personal experience.

5. Tessa Satherley, ‘The Simple Jew’: The ‘Price Tag’ Phenomenon, Vigilantism, and Rabbi Yitzchak Ginsburgh’s Political Kabbalah

This paper explores the Kabbalistic theosophy of Rabbi Yitzchak Ginsburgh, and allegations of links between his yeshiva and violent political activism and vigilantism. Ginsburgh is head of the yeshiva Od Yosef Chai (Joseph Still Lives) in Samaria/the northern West Bank. His students and colleagues have been accused by the authorities of violence and vandalism against Arabs in the context of ‘price tag’ actions and vigilante attacks, while publications by Ginsburgh and his yeshiva colleagues such as Barukh HaGever (Barukh the Man/Blessed is the Man) and Torat HaMelekh (The King’s Torah) have been accused of inciting racist violence. This paper sketches the yeshiva’s history in the public spotlight and describes the esoteric, Kabbalistic framework behind Ginsburgh’s politics, focusing on his political readings of Zoharic Kabbalah and teachings about the mystical value of spontaneous revenge attacks by ‘the simple Jew’, who acts upon his feelings of righteous indignation without prior reflection. The conclusion explores and attempts to delimit the explanatory power of such mystical teachings in light of the sociological characteristics of the Hilltop Youth most often implicated as price tag‘operatives’ and existing scholarly models of vigilantism. It also points to aspects of the mystical teachings with potential for special potency in this context.

Centre for Jewish Studies

University of Manchester

www.melilahjournal.org

New Book: Elad, Core Issues in the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

אלעד, משה. סוגיות הליבה בסכסוך הישראלי-פלסטיני. חיפה: פרדס, 2014.

Untitled

URL: www.pardes.co.il/book.asp?pID=1198

תכנית החלוקה בנובמבר 47′ סדקה את הסדקים המשמעותיים הראשונים בסכסוך שבין התנועה הלאומית הפלסטינית לבין התנועה הציונית ומדינת ישראל. בבסיסה של המחלוקת אז ניצבה אי נכונותם של הערבים להתפשר על חלוקתה של ארץ ישראל. מלחמת השחרור הישראלית בשנת 48′, והנכבה הפלסטינית שבאה בעקבותיה, בקעו בקיעים רחבים נוספים בעימות הזה כשבמרכזו ניצבו סוגיית הפליטים והרס התשתיות הערביות.
מלחמת ששת הימים 67′ והעשור הראשון של הממשל הישראלי בגדה המערבית ובמזרח ירושלים, פערו בין הצדדים תהום שכמעט איננה ניתנת לגישור. רבדיה של תהום זו פרושים על פני סוגית הפליטים לרבות אלו שנוספו בשנת 67′, סוגית מזרח–ירושלים, סוגית ההתנחלויות, וסוגית הגבולות וההסדרים.
ספר זה המבוסס על עבודת דוקטורט שעסקה בממשל הישראלי בעשור הראשון שאחרי מלחמת ששת הימים, 1976-1967, מתאר את לידתן של ארבע סוגיות הליבה תוך הארת היבטים עכשוויים ואקטואליים ותוך ציון ההשלכות המעשיות האפשריות שלהן.

ד”ר משה אלעד, מזרחן, מרצה וחוקר המתמחה בתחום המנהיגות והחברה הפלסטינית ויחסי הגומלין שלהם עם החברה הישראלית מאז העלייה הראשונה בשנת 1882. בוגר החוגים להיסטוריה של המזרח התיכון ולימודי ארץ ישראל באוניברסיטת חיפה, שם גם כתב דוקטורט על הממשל הישראלי בגדה המערבית ובמזרח ירושלים בשנים 1976-1967. כמו כן הוא בוגר תואר שני במנהל ציבורי בבית הספר ג’והן קנדי לממשל באוניברסיטת הרווארד בארצות הברית.
שימש כחוקר וכמתאם מחקרים במוסד שמואל נאמן למחקרי מדיניות לאומית בטכניון.
אלוף משנה בצה”ל, ששימש בתפקידים בכירים בגדה המערבית ובלבנון. בין יתר תפקידיו שימש כראש המנגנון לתיאום ביטחוני עם הרשות הפלסטינית במסגרת “הסכמי אוסלו” (1998-1995).

 

 

New Article: Lavi et al., Protected by Ethos in a Protracted Conflict? A Comparative Study among Israelis and Palestinians

Lavi, Iris, Daphna Canetti, Keren Sharvit, Daniel Bar-Tal, and Stevan E. Hobfoll. “Protected by Ethos in a Protracted Conflict? A Comparative Study among Israelis and Palestinians in the West Bank, Gaza, and East Jerusalem.” Journal of Conflict Resolution 58.1 (2014): 68-92.

URL: http://jcr.sagepub.com/content/58/1/68.abstract

Abstract

Can endorsement of the ethos of conflict alter psychological effects of exposure to political violence? Israelis and Palestinians have been in a state of political and military turmoil for decades. We interviewed 781 Israelis and 1,196 Palestinians living in the West Bank, Gaza Strip, and East Jerusalem. Using structural equation modeling, we found that among those with a weak adherence to ethos of conflict, exposure predicted higher levels of hatred. For Israelis with a weak adherence to ethos of conflict, exposure predicted higher psychological distress and fear. For Palestinians with weaker adherence to ethos of conflict, stronger exposure predicted stronger threat perceptions. Israelis and Palestinians with a strong adherence to the ethos showed steady and high levels of negative emotions and threat, regardless of exposure. These results indicate that ethos of conflict is a double-edged sword that both protects and protracts the conflict. Although it serves as an engine fueling the conflict, it also plays a meaningful role as an empowering force for people suffering the psychological burden of an ongoing conflict.

New Article: Lubin et al., The Israel/Palestine Field School

Lubin, Alex, Les W. Field, Melanie K. Yazzie, and Jakob Schiller. “The Israel/Palestine Field School. Decoloniality and the Geopolitics of Knowledge.” Social Text 31.4 (2013): 79-97.
Abstract
In May 2011, the Anthropology Department and the Department of American Studies at the University of New Mexico offered a class entitled “Technologies of Settler-Colonialism in Israel-Palestine.” This field school was designed as a decolonizing project for American students (an extremely diverse group representative of New Mexico’s particular diverse population that included Hispanic, Native American, Arab and Muslim-American, Jewish-American, and others) that operated at several levels: through close collaboration with local scholars and experts; through experiential ways of knowing and understanding practices of ethnic cleansing and apartheid; and by being present for and with Palestinian testimony in places Americans seldom go and in this way intimately witnessing quotidian parameters of life under occupation. This article elaborates the historical, theoretical, and ethnographic components of the field school’s activities through the student’s daily activities.

Cite: Busbrisdge, Colonial Sovereignty and the Israeli ‘Separation’ Wall

Busbridge, Rachel. “Performing Colonial Sovereignty and the Israeli ‘Separation’ Wall.” Social Identities, online preview, 2013.

 

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13504630.2013.835514

 

Abstract

As a structure that does not mark an actual border and is constructed primarily on occupied territory, the Israeli ‘separation’ wall is a unique space that functions as both border and borderlands. Here, I explore the wall as a performance of sovereignty which simultaneously constructs and de-constructs imaginings of the Israeli nation-state. On the one hand, I contend that the wall is a colonial production that draws a psychic line between a ‘civilised in here’ and ‘uncivilised out there’, fulfilling the double function of forging a perceived bounded, protective national enclosure at the same time as buttressing the necessity of controlling territory beyond the bounds of that enclosure. On the other hand, I argue that the complex relationship between settler and state materialised in the wall points to a blending of theology and politics in Israel, which threatens to empower a God-sanctioned politics that undermines state. In addition to promoting anxiety of the Palestinian ‘out there’, then, the wall is understood as also fostering an anxiety increasingly turned inward to the structures of the Israeli state itself.

Cite: Stern, Jewish Law and Matters of State: Theory, Policy, and Practice

Stern, Yedidia. “Jewish Law and Matters of State: Theory, Policy, and Practice.” Journal of Law, Religion and State. Available online 2012.

URL: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/routledg/ccst/2012/00000016/00000008/art00007

Abstract

In recent years Jewish religious leaders have often expressed religious opinions in matters concerning the foreign and security policy of the State of Israel. The present article focuses on the internal religious legitimacy of halakhic rulings in these matters and reveals the prerequisites that decisors must satisfy before voicing a binding halakhic opinion on issues concerning the Israeli Arab conflict, peace agreements, Jewish settlements in Judah and Samaria, etc. The article is divided into three parts that answer the following questions: (a) are matters of State policy subject to halakhic norms or are they situated outside the realm of Halakha? (b) does Halakha have a judicial policy seeking to rule on these issues? (c) what are the practical difficulties that decisors face if they wish to rule on them? The article points out the diversity of internal halakhic opinions on the questions under investigation, and outlines an analytical method for a halakhic discussion aimed at answering them.

Cite: Lehmann, State Management of Religion or Religious Management of the State?

Lehmann, David. “Israel: State Management of Religion or Religious Management of the State?” Citizenship Studies 16.8 (2012): 1029-1043.

URL: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/routledg/ccst/2012/00000016/00000008/art00007

Abstract

In Israel, the Jewish religion, which is unique among world religions in the primacy it accords to filiation rather than belief as a criterion of belonging, operates as a formal criterion of citizenship, but in substance different ways of being Jewish are expressed in different political forces which in turn struggle for control of the state’s religious orientation. This political struggle leads the state to favour ultra-Orthodox observance and criteria of belonging, even though that is a minority strand in the country itself and even more so outside. Religious interests and ideologies have found substantial niches in the legal system, in education, in the army and in the West Bank settlements, by exploiting the state’s corporatist character, leading to a type of multiculturalism in which the once-secular centre has been seriously eroded.

ToC: Israel Affairs 18,4 (2012)

Israel Affairs, Vol. 18, No. 4, 01 Oct 2012 is now available on Taylor & Francis Online.

This new issue contains the following articles:

Original Articles

Existential threats to Israel: learning from the ancient past
Steven R. David
Pages: 503-525
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.717386

Leadership, preventive war and territorial expansion: David Ben-Gurion and Levi Eshkol
Shlomo Aronson
Pages: 526-545
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.717387

‘Two & three air raids daily. What a bother’: an American diplomat in Israel during the War of Independence
Henry D. Fetter
Pages: 546-562
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.717388

The failed Palestinian–Israeli peace process 1993–2011: an Israeli perspective
Raphael Cohen-Almagor
Pages: 563-576
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.717389

The birth of the core issues: the West Bank and East Jerusalem under Israeli administration 1967–76 (part 1)
Moshe Elad
Pages: 577-595
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.717390

The social representation of incapacity: a psycho-cultural analysis of Israel’s political arena
Mira Moshe
Pages: 596-614
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.717391

The advent of Israel’s commercial lobby
Hila Tal
Pages: 615-628
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.717392

The games must go on? The influence of terror attacks on hosting sporting events in Israel
Yair Galily, Ilan Tamir & Moshe Levy
Pages: 629-644
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.717393

Combat stress reactions during the 1948 war: a conspiracy of silence?
Eldad Rom & Dan Bar-On
Pages: 645-651
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.717394

The US, Hezbollah and the idea of sub-state terrorism
Hussain Sirriyeh
Pages: 652-662
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.717395

Book Reviews

India’s Israel policy
David Rodman
Pages: 663-665
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.718493

The West and the Middle East
David Rodman
Pages: 665-666
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.718494

Nation and history: Israeli historiography between Zionism and post-Zionism
David Rodman
Pages: 666-667
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.718495

Israeli statecraft: national security challenges and responses
David Rodman
Pages: 667-668
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.718496

Confidential: the life of secret agent turned Hollywood tycoon Arnon Milchan
David Rodman
Pages: 669-669
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.718497

The anatomy of Israel’s survival
David Rodman
Pages: 669-670
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.718498

Perspectives of psychological operations (PSYOP) in contemporary conflicts: essays in winning hearts and minds
David Rodman
Pages: 670-671
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.718499

Holy wars: 3000 years of battles in the holy land
David Rodman
Pages: 671-671
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.718500

Crossroads: the future of the U.S.–Israel strategic partnership
David Rodman
Pages: 671-673
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.718501

Israel’s national security law: political dynamics and historical development
David Rodman
Pages: 673-674
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.718502

Reviews: Gorenberg, Unmaking of Israel

Gorenberg, Gershom. The Unmaking of Israel. New York: Harper, 2011.

The Unmaking of Israel By Gershom Gorenberg

 

Reviews

ToC: American Quarterly 62,4 (2010); Forum: Chicano-Palestinian Connections

American Quarterly: Volume 62, Number 4, December 2010

Editor’s Note

Sarah Banet-Weiser

pp. v-vii

Partial AccessHTML Version | Partial AccessPDF Version (68k) | Summary

Forum: Chicano-Palestinian Connections

From La Frontera to Gaza: Chicano-Palestinian Connections

Laura Pulido
David Lloyd

pp. 791-794

Partial AccessHTML Version | Partial AccessPDF Version (86k) | Summary

Subject Headings:

In the Long Shadow of the Settler: On Israeli and U.S. Colonialisms

David Lloyd
Laura Pulido

pp. 795-809

Partial AccessHTML Version | Partial AccessPDF Version (247k) | Summary

Subject Headings:

Containing Bordered “Others” in La Frontera and Gaza: Comparative Lessons on Racializing Discourses and State Violence

José I. Fusté

pp. 811-819

Partial AccessHTML Version | Partial AccessPDF Version (110k) | Summary

Subject Headings:

From Mexico to Palestine: An Occupation of Knowledge, a Mestizaje of Methods

Martha Vanessa Saldívar

pp. 821-833

Partial AccessHTML Version | Partial AccessPDF Version (123k) | Summary

Subject Headings:

Photo Essay

Mizue Aizeki

pp. 835-846

Partial AccessHTML Version | Partial AccessPDF Version (1068k) | Summary

Subject Headings:

Palestinian and Chicano Peoples Share a History of Resistance to Colonization, Racism, and Imperialism

Manuel Criollo

pp. 847-854

Partial AccessHTML Version | Partial AccessPDF Version (102k) | Summary

Subject Headings:

The Right to Education: From La Frontera to Gaza: A Brief Communication

Rana Sharif

pp. 855-860

Partial AccessHTML Version | Partial AccessPDF Version (84k) | Summary

Subject Headings:

Photo Essay

Manzer Foroohar

pp. 861-872

Partial AccessHTML Version | Partial AccessPDF Version (826k) | Summary

Subject Headings:

Cite: Gaess, Interview: Hussein Agha

Roger Gaess. "Interview: Hussein Agha." Middle East Policy 17.2 (2010): 142-51.

 

URL: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/123508061/abstract

Abstract

Dr. Agha is Senior associate of Oxford University’s St. Antony’s College. Over the past several years, he and Robert Malley have attracted wide attention for their articles on the Palestinian-Israeli conflict in The New York Review of Books. Dr. Agha has also co-authored three books with Ahmad Khalidi: A Framework for a Palestinian National Security Doctrine (2006), Track-II Diplomacy: Lessons from the Middle East (2004) and Syria and Iran: The Durable Alliance (1995). He splits his time between London and Beirut. He was interviewed in London by Roger Gaess, a freelance journalist.