New Article: Jobani & Perez, Women of the Wall: A Normative Analysis of the Place of Religion in the Public Sphere

Jobani, Yuval and Nahshon Perez. “Women of the Wall: A Normative Analysis of the Place of Religion in the Public Sphere.” Oxford Journal of Law and Religion 3.3 (2014): 484-505.

 

URL: http://ojlr.oxfordjournals.org/content/3/3/484.abstract

 

Abstract

The place of religion in the public sphere is a controversial issue, and scholarly opinions differ, from insisting on a public sphere that reflects the religion of the majority, to those who insist on it being religion-free. Using the method of inquiry of contextual political theory, we examine the struggle of the Women of Wall (WoW) to pray collectively at the Western Wall. Their struggle began in 1988, and by 2013 includes many Courts decision, social struggles, public committees, and the involvement of many politicians and organizations, both in Israel and the USA. As this struggle takes place at the holiest place for observant Jews, it raises questions beyond its geographical location. The article describes three main normative approaches to state–religion relations (privatization, evenhandedness, and ‘dominant culture view’—DCV), examines them, and attempts to consider their application to the WoW case. Our conclusion points to the advantages of the privatization model, the permissibility of the evenhanded model and points to major shortcomings of the DCV.

Cite: Frattina, Les femmes du Mur des Lamentations

Frattina, Katy Sakina. "Les femmes du Mur des Lamentations." Canadian Journal of Women and the Law 21,2 (2009): 299-314.

Abstract

In October 2003, the Israeli Supreme Court reversed its earlier decision to uphold the right for women to pray out loud while wearing prayer shawls at the Western Wall. The court prohibited the women to pray in a manner contrary to traditional Jewish orthodox rites and ordered the state of Israel to provide an alternate, secure site for them. This case challenges us to think about the interplay between law and diversity-related claims that are made at the nexus of, and intersections between, culture, religion, and gender at the state and community level.

En octobre 2003, la Cour suprême israélienne est revenue sur sa décision d’autoriser les femmes à prier à voix haute et en portant des châles de prière au Mur des Lamentations. La Cour a condamné la prière qui est contraire aux traditions et aux pratiques du judaïsme orthodoxe. Elle a également ordonné à l’État d’Israël de proposer un autre lieu de prières sécuritaire pour les femmes. Cette affaire permet de nous pencher plus en avant sur les interactions entre le droit et la diversité sociale dans le domaine de la culture, de la religion et des questions de genre au niveau de l’État et de la communauté.

URL: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/canadian_journal_of_women_and_the_law/summary/v021/21.2.frattina.html

Keywords: Israel: Religion, Gender, Ultra-Orthodox / Haredi, Israel: Law, Reform Judaism, Jeruslaem, Kotel / Wailing Wall