New Article: Netz & Lefstein, Disagreements in Classroom Discourse: England, US, Israel

Netz, Hadar, and Adam Lefstein. “A Cross-Cultural Analysis of Disagreements in Classroom Discourse: Comparative Case Studies from England, the United States, and Israel.” Intercultural Pragmatics 13.2 (2016): 211-55.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/ip-2016-0009

 

Abstract

How do cultural and institutional factors interact in shaping preference structures? This paper presents a cross-cultural analysis of disagreements in three different classroom settings: (1) a year 6 (ages 11–12) mainstream class in England, (2) a fifth-grade class of gifted students in the United States, and (3) a fourth-grade mainstream class in Israel. The aim of the study is to investigate how disagreements are enacted in these settings, exploring the influence of cultural communicative norms on the one hand and pedagogical goals and norms on the other. The study highlights culture-specific discursive patterns that emerge as the teacher and students manage a delicate balance between often clashing cultural and educational motives.

 

 

 

New Article: Shoham et al, Impulsive and Compulsive Buying Behaviors among Israeli and U.S. Consumers

Shoham, Aviv, Yossi Gavish, and Sigal Segev. “A Cross-Cultural Analysis of Impulsive and Compulsive Buying Behaviors among Israeli and U.S. Consumers: The Influence of Personal Traits and Cultural Values.” Journal of International Consumer Marketing 27.3 (2015): 187-206.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08961530.2014.1000507

 

Abstract

This study tests a model to investigate the extent to which drivers of compulsive and impulsive buying behaviors overlap. The model includes personal and cultural antecedents for traits of consumer impulsiveness and compulsiveness and impulsive and compulsive buying behaviors as outcomes. Survey results from 336 Israeli and 595 U.S. consumers indicate that the personality antecedents envy, low self-esteem, and fantasizing generally drive consumer traits of impulsiveness and compulsiveness, though some differences exist between consumers in the U.S. and Israel. However, cultural orientations were found to be insignificant in driving traits of impulsiveness or compulsiveness.

New Article: Shagrir, Teacher Educators in Israel and in the USA

Shagrir, Leah. “Factors Affecting the Professional Characteristics of Teacher Educators in Israel and in the USA: A Comparison of Two Models.” Compare 45.2 (2015): 206-25.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03057925.2013.828395

 

Abstract

The objective of this research study was to identify the factors affecting the professional characteristics of teacher educators by comparing two models of teacher education. The research findings revealed four major focal points that have an impact on professional characteristics: the operational model adopted by the institution where teacher educators work; the breadth and depth of teacher educators’ research and scholarship and the degree to which such scholarship is required as part of the assessment criteria; the cooperation between the training institution and the practical field (i.e., the schools where the students do their practice teaching); and the informal relationships between teacher educators and their students. The novelty of the study resides in the fact that these points affect teacher educators’ professional characteristics and that focusing on these characteristics facilitates a comprehensive view of methods, tools and directions that may expedite the professional development of teacher educators.

New Article: Shoham et al, Children’s Influence on Family Purchasing Decisions

Shoham, Aviv, Bella Florenthal, and Fredric Kropp. “Children’s Influence on Family Purchasing Decisions: An Israeli Replication.” In Global Perspectives in Marketing for the 21st Century (ed. Ajay K. Manrai and H. Lee Meadow; New York: Springer, 2015): 87-91.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-17356-6_25

 

Abstract

Studies exploring kids’ influence have used different methodologies. Thus, it is virtually impossible to compare their findings. Additionally, most previous studies have been conducted in the US. Therefore, cross-cultural comparisons are few and far between. We replicate Ward and Wackman’s study (1972) and present a cross-cultural comparison between Israeli and US samples. The study revealed differences across products and age groups. Israeli children request more frequently products that are used primary by children such as clothing, bicycles and records. US children mostly try to influence the purchase of food products such as breakfast cereals, snacks and soft drinks. Additionally, for most products, Israeli mothers tend to yield more often than US mothers do.

Cite: Bernard, Israeli-Palestinian Conflict in Metropolitan Popular Culture

Bernard, Anna. “Consuming Palestine: The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict in Metropolitan Popular Culture.” Journal for Cultural Research 16.2-3 (2012): 197-216. [Special Issue: Arab Cultural Studies]

 

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14797585.2012.647669

Abstract

In the last decade, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict has assumed an exceptional prominence in metropolitan popular culture. This essay argues that the conflict’s popular stature cannot be explained solely in terms of the increased level of general interest in Middle East politics after 9/11. Instead, the conflict has a broader and more profound function: it provides a means for North American and European audiences to imagine a kind of political belief and political belonging that is seemingly more consequential, urgent, and “real” than their own political circumstances, and yet also reassuringly distant from them. Through readings of the Adam Sandler film You Don’t Mess with the Zohan (2008) and the “peace process” episodes of The West Wing (2004), this essay examines the ways in which metropolitan cultural production about Israel/Palestine uses the conflict to confirm and promote the idea that political belief is intrinsically identitarian. Yet at the same time, by producing fantasy solutions to the conflict, these productions ask viewers to believe that the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is not static and eternal, despite all the evidence our popular culture offers to the contrary. The very drive to produce fantasy solutions suggests that alongside all its other functions, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict also makes us want to imagine political change and to envisage another kind of future.