New Article: Suwaed, The Image of the Bedouin in Travel Literature of the 19th Century

Suwaed, Muhammad. “The Image of the Bedouin in Travel Literature and Western Researchers Who Visited Palestine in the Nineteenth Century.” Digest of Middle East Studies (early view; online first).
 
URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dome.12075
 
Abstract

With the weakening of the Ottoman government from the end of the sixteenth century onwards, the Bedouin took over the control of the entire Country of Palestine. As the Bedouin were present across the country, western travelers and researches visiting the Holy Land as tourists, visitors, and investigators often met the Bedouin, especially during the robbery and plunder executed by the Bedouin upon travelers, and when hiring them as tour guides, renting their camels, or employing them as guards. On their return to their countries, these travelers reported on their experiences in the East in the form of books. These western travelers and researchers, in their writings, dealt with the Bedouin. They described them as providers of services to caravans, transporters of luggage, tour guides, and robbers. The writers and researchers explicitly described the traits, characters, food habits, clothing, residences, and occupations of the Bedouin.

 

 

 

New Article: Vyas et al, Differences in Travel Behavior Across Population Sectors in Jerusalem

Vyas, Gaurav, Christina Bernardo, Peter Vovsha, Danny Givon, Yehoshua Birotker, Eitan Bluer, and Amir Mossek. “Differences in Travel Behavior Across Population Sectors in Jerusalem, Israel.” Transportation Research Record 2495(2016).

 

URL: http://trrjournalonline.trb.org/doi/abs/10.3141/2495-07

 

Abstract

The population of Jerusalem, Israel, can be divided into three distinct ethnic sectors: secular Jewish, ultra-Orthodox Jewish, and Arab. Not only do these population sectors tend to inhabit and work in different areas of the city, but they each have unique household structures, activity patterns, mobility tendencies, and, ultimately, travel behavior. These substantial variations in behavior, largely driven by differences in culture and lifestyle that are not captured by other personal characteristics, are essential to representing travel behavior in the Jerusalem travel model. In this paper, sector differences were traced through the activity-based travel demand model framework by using the 2010 Jerusalem Household Travel Survey. Significant variations in behavior were seen both in direct relation to the population sector and in interactions with other socioeconomic and demographic characteristics such as income and gender. This is the first known travel demand model in practice to incorporate ethnic differences so extensively in its application.

 

 

 

New Article: Gold, Adaptation and Return among Israeli Enclave and Infotech Entrepreneurs

Gold, Steven J. “Adaptation and Return among Israeli Enclave and Infotech Entrepreneurs.” In Immigration and Work (ed. Jody Agius Vallejo; Bingley: Emerald, 2015), 203-29.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/S0277-283320150000027022

 

Abstract

Purpose

Since the widespread adoption of the concept, transnational theorizing has attended to inequalities with regard to legal status, education, travel, and access to capital to understand the experience of migrant populations. This issue has become especially pertinent in recent years, as a growing body of journalistic and scholarly attention has been devoted to a new group of transnationals who work as entrepreneurs, professionals, and financiers involved in high tech and other cutting-edge economic activities. Regarded as among the world’s most powerful engines of economic growth and innovation, these entrepreneurs enjoy unprecedented levels of income, state-granted privileges (including permission to work), and access to elite institutions. Because of their level of resources, some observers contend that this group represents a fundamentally new category of immigrants distinct not only from labor migrants but also from merchants, professionals, and technicians.

Methodology/approach

To better understand their experience, this chapter draws on in-depth interviews and ethnographic research to compare two groups of Israeli immigrants living in Western societies: high-tech entrepreneurs and enclave entrepreneurs. Focusing on their economic and collective lives, it identifies similarities and differences among the two.

Findings

Conclusions suggest that the mostly male high-tech migrants do enjoy incomes, contacts, and access to travel that far exceed those available to labor and skilled migrants. Moreover, infotech immigrants are not dependent upon contacts with local co-ethnics that are vital for the survival of most other migrant populations. However, the communal, identity-related and familial concerns of infotech migrants are not completely amenable to their considerable resources. Accordingly, as they address these matters, their experience reveals significant similarities to those of migrants bearing a less privileged status.

Research implications

Collective, familial and identificational issues play central roles in shaping patterns of work and travel among high-tech transnational entrepreneurs. As such, these issues deserve continued attention in studies of global migration and work.

Originality/value

Research is based on a multi-sited ethnographic study of Israeli enclave and infotech entrepreneurs.

 

New Book: Bar, Reinternment of Renowned Men in the Land of Israel, 1904-1967 (in Hebrew)

Bar, Doron. Ideology and Symbolic Landscape. The Reinternment of Renowned Men in the Land of Israel, 1904-1967. Jerusalem: Magnes, 2015 (in Hebrew).

 

reinterment

 

Why was Theodor Herzl buried on a desolate mountaintop in West Jerusalem and why did his resting place remain many years with no tombstone?

What is the reason that Judah Leib Pinsker was buried in an ancient burial cave of the Second Temple period?

How was Ramat Hanadiv designed as a burial ground for Edmond Benjamin James de Rothschild?

Why was Otto Warburg buried in Degania?

Doron Bar’s new book examines these issues. Through detailed documentation and accompanying photographs, it delineates the journeys of these figures and other prominent leaders – visionaries of Zionism, political leaders, heroes, intellectuals and pioneers – from the diaspora to their reinternment in the Land of Israel. It examines the question regarding the reasons for the great efforts to bring their remains to burial in Israel, as well as the conduct of the necessary procedures in Israel and abroad. It discusses what made the graves of these prominent men – in Jerusalem, Tel Aviv, Zikhron Ya’akov and Kinneret – a pilgrimage site, that contributed to the design of the symbolic and civic landscape of the State of Israel
.

 

 

New Article: Garyn-Tal & Shahrabani, Type of Army Service and Risky Behavior among Young People in Israel

Garyn-Tal, Sharon and Shosh Shahrabani. “Type of Army Service and Decision to Engage in Risky Behavior among Young People in Israel.” Judgment and Decision Making 10.4 (2015): 342-54.

 

URL: http://www.sas.upenn.edu/~baron/journal/15/15320a/jdm15320a.pdf [pdf]

 

Abstract

Previous studies have examined the impact of military service on the decision to engage in risky behavior. Yet most of these studies focused on voluntary recruits, did not distinguish between legal and illegal risky activities and did not compare combat and non-combat soldiers during and after service according to gender. The current study is unique because of the nature of Israeli compulsory army service. It examines the relationship between type of army service and five legal and illegal risky behaviors for three groups: non-combat, combat without fighting experience, and combat with fighting experience. We also examine differences in the propensity for risky behavior between men, most of whom are assigned to combat units due to the army’s needs, and women, who serve in combat units on a voluntary basis only. A questionnaire survey was randomly distributed at train stations and central bus stations in Israel among 413 soldiers and ex-soldiers between the ages of 18-30. The predictor variables include type of service or battle experience, the Evaluation of Risks scale and sociodemographic characteristics. In general, we found that high percentages of young people engage in risky behavior, especially illegal behavior. The results indicate that fighting experience is significantly and positively correlated with the consumption of illegal substances for currently serving men soldiers (but not for women) and this effect is mitigated after discharge from the army. Importantly, the use of illegal substances is not a result of the individual’s preferences for engaging in various risky behaviors. Thus, our results suggest that the effect of the increased propensity toward risky behavior following the experience of fighting overrides the combat unit’s discipline for men when it comes to the consumption of illegal substances. In addition, our findings indicate that serving in a combat unit as opposed to a non-combat unit affects the tendency of women ex-combat soldiers to travel to risky destinations, though this is probably related to their original higher risk attitude, since women must volunteer for combat units.

New Article: Beck, From West Africa to Mecca and Jerusalem: The Tijāniyya on the Hajj Routes

Beck, Irit. “From West Africa to Mecca and Jerusalem: The Tijāniyya on the Hajj Routes.” Journal of the Middle East and Africa 6.1 (2015): 1-15.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/21520844.2015.1026243

 

Abstract

Pilgrimage routes from West Africa provided channels for cultural and spiritual exchange between West African and Middle Eastern Muslims, and facilitated religious exchanges. Some of these exchanges were orthodox in nature; others, such as Sufi beliefs and practices, were more popular in their appeal. This article examines the ways that Tijāniyya tāriqa leaders and disciples spread their beliefs and practices along the hajj routes during the colonial period. Since this period saw the transformation of boundaries and borders, the hajj could be perceived more as a “state affair,” as its routes moved within the boundaries of the new empires or fluctuated between the new colonial empires. The article focuses on the Tijāniyya tāriqa, mainly because this tāriqa was relatively new (established around the beginning of the nineteenth century) and as such serves as a good case study for the spread of tāriqa affiliations through the hajj routes from West Africa during the colonial period. This article also examines the role of the hajj for Tijāni West African Muslims who settled in Jerusalem in the same period.

Bibliography: Leo Baeck Institute Yearbook bibliography on Zionism and Israel (2014)

Bibliography: Zionism and Israel. Published in the Leo Baeck Institute Yearbook 59 (2014): 460-466.

57203. Alroey, Gur: “Zionism without Zion”? Territorialist Ideology and the Zionist Movement, 1882–1956. [In]: Jewish Social Studies, Vol. 18(1), 2013. Pp. 1–32

57204. Al-Salim, Farid: Key to three crises: The Ha’avara Agreement, Jewish immigration, and the Peel Plan of Partition of Palestine. [In]: Journal of South Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, Vol. 37(1), 2013. Pp. 86–102

57205. Armborst-Weihs, Kerstin: The Formation of the Jewish National Movement Through Transnational Exchange: Zionism in Europe up to the First World War. [In]: Europäische Geschichte Online. http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0159–2011080820 (07.08.2014)

57206. Ashkenazi, Ofer: The Biramschule in Context – The »German« Influence on Jewish Body Culture in Mandate Palestine. [In]: Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte, Vol. 41, 2013 (Issue title: Deutsche(s) in Palästina und Israel. Alltag, Kultur, Politik. Ed. by José Brunner). Pp. 17–39

57207. Behar, Moshe; Benite, Zvi Ben-Dor (eds.): Modern Middle Eastern Jewish Thought: Writings on Identity, Politics, and Culture, 1893–1958. Waltham, MA: Brandeis University Press, 2013. XXXIX, 257 pp., ISBN 978-1-58465-884-9 / 978-1-58465-885-6 [Reviewed by: Orit Bashkin, on: https://www.h-net.org/reviews/showrev.php?id=41227 (22.05.2014). Incl. i. a.: European Zionism and the Arabs and Jews in Palestine]

57208. Ben-Ari, Nitsa: Hebrew Translations of German Classics – Attraction and Aversion. [In]: Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte, Vol. 41, 2013 (Issue title: Deutsche(s) in Palästina und Israel. Alltag, Kultur, Politik. Ed. by José Brunner). Pp. 129–142

57209. BERGMANN, ERNST DAVID. Orchin, Milton; Fenichel, Henry; Jensen, William B.: Scientist in the Service of Israel. The Life and Times of Ernst David Bergmann (1903–1975). Jerusalem: Hebrew University Magnes Press, 2011. XVIII, 374 pp., ISBN 978-965-493-580-7 [“This is the first book-length study of the life and career of the Israeli chemist Ernst David Bergmann. It traces his birth and education in Germany; his decision, after the rise of Hitler, to immigrate to Palestine rather than to accept a position at Oxford; and his intimate 18-year association with Chaim Weizmann – not only as his closest scientific associate but also as Scientific Director of both the Sieff Institute and of the Weizmann Institute …”]

57210. BERGNER, ELISABETH. Feinberg, Anat: »Von Gott begnadete Schauspielerin«: Elisabeth Bergner in Israel. [In]: Aschkenas, Vol. 21(1–2) (2011), 2013. Pp. 229–246

57211. BIRNBAUM, NATHAN. Olson, Jess: Nathan Birnbaum and Jewish Modernity: Architect of Zionism, Yiddishism, and Orthodoxy. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2013, 408 pp. (Stanford Studies in Jewish History and Culture), ISBN 978-0-8047-7873-2 [Reviewed by: Kerstin Armborst-Weihs, in: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/rezension.html (06.05.2014)]

––. BUBER, MARTIN. Wolf, Siegbert: Martin Bubers Konzeption der Binationalität (2012). See No. 55784

––. Buber, Martin: Zwei Völker in Palästina (1947). See No. 55784

57212. DUBNOW, SIMON. Jilek, Grit: Nation ohne Territorium. Über die Organisierung der jüdischen Diaspora bei Simon Dubnow. Baden-Baden: Nomos, 2013. 524 pp. (Schriftenreihe der Sektion Politische Theorien und Ideengeschichte in der Deutschen Vereinigung für Politische Wissenschaft, Vol. 24), ISBN 978-3-8329-7738-2

57213. Edelmann-Ohler, Eva: Sprache des Krieges. Deutungen des Ersten Weltkriegs in zionistischer Publizistik und Literatur (1914–1918). Zürich: ETH Zürich, 2013. 306 pp., illus. (ETH Zürich Diss. No. 20986)

57214. Eiff, Hansjörg: Die jüdische Heimstätte in Palästina in der Außenpolitik der Weimarer Republik. [In]: Zeitschrift für Geschichtswissenschaft, Vol. 61(12), 2013. Pp. 1005–1028

57215. Gechtman, Roni: Nationalising the Bund? Zionist historiography and the Jewish labour movement. [In]: East European Jewish Affairs, Vol. 43(3), 2013. Pp. 249–264 [Abstract: This article examines the academic historiography on the Jewish Workers’ Bund produced by Israeli and Zionist scholars. While the contribution of Israeli scholars to the historiography on the Bund has been significant in both quantity and quality, their works have had to grapple with the tension between the goals of Zionist historiography and the Bund’s political and ideological commitments, namely the party’s radical opposition to nationalism in general and to Zionism in particular. To various degrees, Israeli scholars sought to “nationalise” the Yiddish-speaking labour movement in Eastern Europe and incorporate it into a coherent narrative of the Jews’ past as an “organic” nation. As a result of their authors’ ideological and methodological preconceptions, and by portraying it as a nationalist movement, these works often misrepresent the Bund’s ideas, policies and activities.]

––. Graur, Mina: Anarchismus und Zionismus. Die Debatte über den jüdischen Nationalismus (2008). See No. 55784

57216. Grill, Tobias: Antizionistische jüdische Bewegungen. [In]: Europäische Geschichte Online. http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0159–2011081886 (07.08.2014)

57217. GRONEMANN, SAMMY. Kühne, Jan: “Wer ist wer?!”. Sammy Gronemanns Jakob und Christian. [In]: PaRDeS. Zeitschrift der Vereinigung für Jüdische Studien, Vol. 19, 2013 (Issue title: Galut Sepharad in Aschkenas: Sepharden im deutschsprachigen Kulturraum). Pp. 191–206 [http://opus.kobv.de/ubp/volltexte/2013/6527/ (04.09.2013)]

57218. Grüner, Frank; Hohler, Susanne: Offener Brief der zionistischen Jugendorganisation Betar an den Nationalrat der Jüdischen Gemeinden im Fernen Osten vom 25. Januar 1939. [In]: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/articles.html#artikel308

57219. Harpaz, Nathan: Zionist Architecture and Town Planning: The Building of Tel Aviv (1919–1929). West Lafayette, IN: Purdue University Press, 2013. xi, 277 pp., illus., ISBN 9781557536730

57220. Hermann, Tamar S.: Zionism and Palestinian Nationalism: Possibilities of Recognition. [In]: Israel Studies, Vol. 18(2), 2013 (Special Issue: Shared Narratives – A Palestinian-Israeli Dialogue). Pp. 133–147

57221. Herrmann, Manja: “[B]eide zu einem harmonischen Ganzen verschmolzen”: Particularism, Universalism, and the Hybrid Jewish Nation in Early German Zionist Discourse. [In]: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/articles.html#artikel323

––. HERZL, THEODOR. Ben-Ami: Herzl and the First Congress. See No. 56248

57222. HESS, MOSES; PINSKER, LEON; RÜLF, MORITZ. Schoeps, Julius H.: Pioneers of Zionism: Hess, Pinsker, Rülf. Messianism, Settlement Policy, and the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict. Translated by Margaret-Ann Schellenberg. Berlin [et al.]: de Gruyter, 2013. 158 pp., illus., ISBN 978-3-11-031458-8 [Reviewed by: Philipp von Wussow, in: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/rezension.html (06.05.2014)]

––. Hessing, Jakob: Germanistik in Israel. Aspekte einer Trauerarbeit. See No. 57755

57223. Jessen, Caroline: Bücher als Dinge. Funktionen emigrierter Bücher und Büchersammlungen für deutsch-jüdische Einwanderer in Palästina/Israel nach 1933 aus Perspektive der Kanonforschung. [In]: Exilforschung, Vol. 29, 2011. Pp. 12–27

57224. Jessen, Caroline: Das problematische Bild der geretteten Kultur – Büchersammlungen deutsch-jüdischer Einwanderer in Israel. [In]: Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte, Vol. 41, 2013 (Issue title: Deutsche(s) in Palästina und Israel. Alltag, Kultur, Politik. Ed. by José Brunner). Pp. 179

57225. Jessen, Caroline: Spuren deutsch-jüdischer Geschichte. Erschließung und Erforschung von Nachlässen und Sammlungen in Israel. [In]: Der Archivar, Vol. 66(3), 2013. Pp. 328–331

57226. Kraft, Christian: Die Synagogen Binjan Zion und Chorew – Der Konflikt zweier deutscher Einwanderergemeinden in Jerusalem. [In]: Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte, Vol. 41, 2013 (Issue title: Deutsche(s) in Palästina und Israel. Alltag, Kultur, Politik. Ed. by José Brunner). Pp. 97–126

57227. Kühne, Jan: Das Ende einer jüdischen Welttournee – Sammy Gronemann und die zionistische »Rückkehr in die Geschichte«. [In]: Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte, Vol. 41, 2013 (Issue title: Deutsche(s) in Palästina und Israel. Alltag, Kultur, Politik. Ed. by José Brunner). Pp. 143–160

57228. LASKER-SCHÜLER, ELSE; WILHELM, KURT. Kohler, George Y.: »Platzmachen für Gott« – Else Lasker-Schüler, Rabbiner Kurt Wilhelm und der religiöse Liberalismus in Palästina. [In]: Aschkenas, Vol. 21(1–2) (2011), 2013. Pp. 179–199

57229. Liebermann, Guido: La psychanalyse en Palestine 1918–1948. Aux origines du mouvement analytique israélien. Préface de Elisabeth Roudinesco. Paris: Campagne Première, 2012. 318 pp., ISBN 978-2-915789-53-9 [Incl. i. a.: L’arrivée des psychanalystes autrichiens en Palestine (1938); Traduire Freud en hébreu; Freud en Eretz Israël]

57230. Litt, Stefan: Zeugnisse deutsch-jüdischer Kulturgeschichte – Der Erwerb deutschsprachiger Privatnachlässe für die Jewish National and University Library in Jerusalem 1934–1971. [In]: Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte, Vol. 41, 2013 (Issue title: Deutsche(s) in Palästina und Israel. Alltag, Kultur, Politik. Ed. by José Brunner). Pp. 195–212

––. Luden, Josef: Israel: Zionismus & Anarchismus (1985). See No. 55784

57231. Maier-Wolthausen, Clemens: Eine unmögliche Reise. Ein Brief der Kinder- und Jugendalija in Schweden von 1940. [In]: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/articles.html#artikel308

57232. Maksymiak, Małgorzata A.: Untergangs- und Aufgangsprobleme der [sic] jüdischen Homo Europaeus. Zur zionistischen Kritik an Spenglers Geschichtsphilosophie. [In]: Zaur Gasimov; Carl Antonius Lemke Duque (Hrsg.): Oswald Spengler als europäisches Phänomen. Der Transfer der Kultur- und Geschichtsmorphologie im Europa der Zwischenkriegszeit 1919–1939. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht 2013 (Veröffentlichungen des Instituts für Europäische Geschichte Mainz, Abteilung für Universalgeschichte, Beiheft 99), ISBN 978-3-525-10126-1. Pp. 299–322

57233. Maksymiak, Malgorzata Anna: “Ezer Ke-Negdo” in Zionism: The Cases of Gerda Luft and Gabriele Tergit. [In]: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/articles.html#artikel323

57234. Maoz, Moshe: The Zionist/Jewish and Palestinian/Arab National Movements: The Question of Legitimacy – A Comparative Observation. [In]: Israel Studies, Vol. 18(2), 2013 (Special Issue: Shared Narratives – A Palestinian-Israeli Dialogue). Pp. 30–40

57235. Marzano, Arturo: Visiting British Palestine: Zionist travelers to Eretz Israel. [In]: Quest. Issues in Contemporary Jewish History, Vol. 4(6), 2013. http://www.quest-cdecjournal.it/index.php (03.03.2014)

57236. Michaels, Jennifer: An Unusual Traveler: Ida Pfeiffer’s Visit to the Holy Land in 1842. [In]: Quest. Issues in Contemporary Jewish History, Vol. 4(6), 2013. http://www.quest-cdecjournal.it/index.php (03.03.2014)

57237. Miron, Guy: Exile, Diaspora and the Promised Land: Jewish Future Images in Nazi Dominated Europe. [In]: Pál Hatos; Attila Novák (eds.): Between Minority and Majority: Hungarian and Jewish/Israeli Ethnical and Cultural Experiences in Recent Centuries. Budapest: Balassi Inst., 2013. Pp. 147–166

57238. Miskin, Edgar: Illegal Journey: From the Holocaust to Palestine in 1946. New York: Devora, 2013. 314 pp., ISBN 9789655241273

57239. MÜLLER-COHEN, ANITTA. Hecht, Dieter J.: Biographien jüdischer Frauen: Anitta Müller-Cohen (1890–1962). Sozialarbeit und Zionismus zwischen Wien und Tel Aviv. [In]: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/miscellaneous.html#artikel301

57240. Nemtsov, Jascha: Doppelt vertrieben: Deutsch-jüdische Komponisten aus dem östlichen Europa in Palästina/Israel. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 2013. 336 pp., illus., music (Jüdische Musik, Vol. 11), ISBN 978-3-447-06975-5

57241. Nittenberg, Joanna; Kaufmann, Benjamin (eds.): Trotz allem … Aron Menczer und die Jugendalijah. Wien: Edition INW, 2013. 191 pp., illus., ISBN 9783950035667 [Aron Menczer, b. 18. 04. 1917 Vienna, d. 7. 10. 1943 KZ Auschwitz-Birkenau]

57242. Or, Galia Bar; Minten-Jung, Nicole; Möller, Werner; Yasky, Yuval; Lehmann, Katja; Sonder, Ines; Oswalt, Philipp: Kibbuz und Bauhaus. Pioniere des Kollektivs. Leipzig: Spector Books, 2012. 144 S., ISBN 978-3940064448 [Reviewed by: Alexandra Klei, in: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/rezension.html (06.05.2014)]

57243. Oswalt, Philipp (ed.): bauhaus. Zeitschrift der Stiftung Bauhaus Dessau, Ausgabe 2: Israel, November 2011. 152 pp., ISBN 978-3940064295 [Reviewed by: Alexandra Klei, in: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/rezension.html (06.05.2014)]

57244. Patek, Artur: Jews on Route to Palestine 1934–1944. Sketches from the History of Aliyah Bet. Clandestine Jewish Immigration. Krakow: Jagiellonian University Press, 2012. 220 pp., ISBN 978-83-233-3390-6 [Reviewed by: Farid Al-Salim, in: American Historical Review, Vol. 119(3), 2014. Pp. 1022]

57245. Peiffer, Lorenz; Zimmermann, Moshe (eds.): Sport als Element des Kulturtransfers. Jüdische Sportler zwischen NS-Deutschland und Palästina. Göttingen: Wallstein, 2013. 249 pp., illus., ISBN 978-3-8353-1234-0 [Vorwort (Lorenz Peiffer; Moshe Zimmermann, 7–8); Einleitung (Lorenz Peiffer; Moshe Zimmermann, 9–13); Die Einsamkeit des Langstreckenläufers. Deutsch-jüdische Athleten und die Entstehung einer zionistischen (trans)nationalen Kultur (Ofer Ashkenazi, 14–48); Arthur Biram und die Einführung des Turnunterrichts in Erez Israel (Ofer Ashkenazi; Eyal Gertmann, 49–72); Die Beteiligung jüdischer Sportler aus Deutschland an der II. Makkabiah 1935 in Tel Aviv (Henry Wahlig, 73–98); Im Schatten antisemitischer Diskriminierung und Verfolgung. Sportliche Begegnungen zwischen jüdischen Mannschaften aus Nazideutschland und Erez Israel im Jahre 1937 (Eyal Gertmann; Lorenz Peiffer, 99–134); Zwischen Diaspora und Erez Israel – Fußball als Element des Kulturtransfers (Moshe Zimmermann, 135–146); »Im Turnunterricht ist ganz neu, daß man möglichst hebräische Kommandos gebrauchen möchte.« Die Veränderung des Turnunterrichts an den jüdischen Schulen im nationalsozialistischen Deutschland (Lorenz Peiffer; Nadine Werner, 147–168); Schulsport in Palästina von 1933 bis 1938 – im Spiegel von Berichten in deutsch-jüdischen Zeitungen (Lorenz Peiffer; Nadine Werner, 169–172); Dokumention. Einführung und Kommentierung der Dokumente (Ofer Ashkenazi; Eyal Gertmann; Henry Wahlig, 175–184); Dokumente: 1. Transfer von Sportarten nach Erez Israel (185); 2. Vereinsentwicklung in Erez Israel (193); 3. Jüdische Sportlerinnen und Sportler aus Deutschland bei der Makkabiah 1935 (200); 4. Sportreisen jüdischer Mannschaften nach Erez Israel nach Nazideutschland (234); 5. Sport in Palästina in den 1920er Jahren (245)]

57246. Poppe, Judith: Zwischen »unauffindbarem Gestern« und dem »Himmel voll Zuversicht«? Konzeptionen der Alten und der Neuen Heimat bei deutschsprachigen Schriftsteller/innen Israels. [In]: Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte, Vol. 41, 2013 (Issue title: Deutsche(s) in Palästina und Israel. Alltag, Kultur, Politik. Ed. by José Brunner). Pp. 161–178

––. Popper, Hans: Die freie organisierte Gemeinschaft des jüdischen Yishuv (Einwohnerschaft) in Palästina (1949). See No. 55784

57247. Rautenberg-Alianov, Viola: Schlagsahne oder Shemen-Öl? Deutsch-jüdische Hausfrauen und ihre Küche in Palästina 1936–1940. [In]: Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte, Vol. 41, 2013 (Issue title: Deutsche(s) in Palästina und Israel. Alltag, Kultur, Politik. Ed. by José Brunner). Pp. 82–96

57248. Rodov, Ilia: “With Eyes towards Zion:” Visions of the Holy Land in Romanian Synagogues. [In]: Quest. Issues in Contemporary Jewish History, Vol. 4(6), 2013. http://www.quest-cdecjournal.it/index.php (03.03.2014)

57249. Rokem, Na’ama: Prosaic Conditions: Heinrich Heine and the Spaces of Zionist Literature. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2013. XXI, 221 pp., ISBN 978-0-8101-2867-5 [Reviewed by: Allison Schachter, on: http://www.h-net.org/reviews/showpdf.php?id=42229 (19.08.2014)]

57250. Sebba-Elran, Tsafi: From Sefer Ha’aggadah to the Jewish Bookcase: Dynamics of a Cultural Change. [In]: Jewish Studies Quarterly, Vol. 20(3), 2013. Pp. 272–295 [The manifest popularity of H. N. Bialik and Y. H. Ravnitzky’s Sefer Ha’aggadah, its influence on the educational curriculum in the Yishuv and later in the State of Israel and the various languages into which it is translated all bear witness to the formative role of this book through the years in the construction of modern cultural memory … Only Sefer Ha’aggadah acquired such an influence that it became known as “the New Torah” of the Jews. This article seeks to understand and explain Bialik and Ravnitzky’s unique success in light of their literary innovations and cultural vision and to examine how they used their literary tools to bridge the historical and ideological gap between rabbinic tradition and the Jewish thought of their time … Like the romantic philosophers Herder and Schlegel, and apparently following Ahad Ha’am, Bialik and Ravnitzky related to Jewish myth and particularly to the aggadah as a national cultural heritage …]

57251. Sela-Sheffy, Rakefet: »Europeans in the Levant« Revisited – German Jewish Immigrants in 1930s Palestine and the Question of Culture Retention. [In]: Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte, Vol. 41, 2013 (Issue title: Deutsche(s) in Palästina und Israel. Alltag, Kultur, Politik. Ed. by José Brunner). Pp. 40–59

57252. Selzer, Assaf: The History of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Vol. 4: Who’s Who Prior to Statehood: Founders, Designers, Pioneers. Jerusalem: Magnes Press, 2013. 405 pp., ISBN 978-965-493-691-0

––. Shapiro, Alexander: Internationale Probleme. Palästina, England und die jüdische Frage (1930). See No. 55784

57253. Sheffi, Na’ama; Meilinger, Liliane: Vom Deutschen ins Hebräische. Übersetzungen aus dem Deutschen im Jüdischen Palästina 1882–1948. Translated by Liliane Meilinger. With a preface by Shulamit Volkov. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2011. 219 pp. (Jüdische Religion, Geschichte und Kultur, Vol. 14), ISBN 978-3-525-56938-2

57254. Shindler, Colin: The origins of Zionism. [In]: Joel Peters and David Newman (eds.): The Routledge Handbook on the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict. London [et. al.]: Routledge, 2013. ISBN 978-0-415-77862-6 / 978-0-203-07955-3. Pp. 11–19

57255. Shumsky, Dimitry: Leon Pinsker and “Autoemancipation!”: A Reevaluation. [In]: Jewish Social Studies, Vol. 18(1), 2013. Pp. 34–62

57256. Shumsky, Dimitry: Zweisprachigkeit und binationale Idee. Der Prager Zionismus 1900–1930. Transl. from the Hebrew by Dafna Mach. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2013. 336 pp. (Schriften des Simon-Dubnow-Instituts, Vol. 14), ISBN 978-352-53695-5-5 / 978-3-647-36955-6 (online resource) [Reviewed by: Martha Stellmacher. in: PaRDeS. Zeitschrift der Vereinigung für Jüdische Studien, Vol. 20, 2014. Pp. 175–176; Romy Langeheine, on: http://hsozkult.geschichte.hu-berlin.de/rezensionen/2014–2–188 (20.06.2014). “Die deutsche Übersetzung von Dimitry Shumskys 2005 an der Universität Haifa entstandener geschichtswissenschaftlicher Dissertation, die 2010 erstmalig auf Hebräisch erschien, macht nun auch der deutschen Leserschaft eine innovative Studie zum Prager Zionismus und den Anfängen der binationalen Idee als Lösungsmöglichkeit des jüdisch-arabischen Konflikts in Palästina zugänglich. Dieser Lösungsansatz wurde insbesondere von Mitgliedern des 1925 in Jerusalem gegründeten Intellektuellenzirkels Brith Schalom verfolgt, die bereits zu dieser Zeit auf die Dringlichkeit der Aussöhnung zwischen Juden und Arabern hinwiesen und verschiedene politische Programme dazu ausarbeiteten …”]

57257. Siegemund, Anja: Eine Bürgergesellschaft für den Jischuw – Deutsche liberalnationale Zionisten in Palästina. [In]: Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte, Vol. 41, 2013 (Issue title: Deutsche(s) in Palästina und Israel. Alltag, Kultur, Politik. Ed. by José Brunner). Pp. 60–81

57258. Sonder, Ines: “Das wollten wir. Ein neues Land …” Deutsche Zionistinnen als Pionierinnen in Palästina, 1897–1933. [In]: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/articles.html#artikel323

57259. Stahl, Neta: Other and Brother: Jesus in the 20th-Century Jewish Literary Landscape. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012. 248 pp., ISBN 978-0-19-976000-8 [Reviewed by Adele Reinhartz, on: https://www.h-net.org/reviews/showrev.php?id=3D39833 (25.01.2014). Incl. i. a.: The positive appropriation of Jesus by Zionist authors like Uri Zvi Greenberg (1896–1981), Yoel Hoffman (b. 1937), Avot Yeshurun (1904–1992), and others]

––. THEILHABER, FELIX ARON. Heuer, Renate: Eroberung des neuen Judentums für Israel – Felix Aron Theilhaber. See No. 57014

––. Vago, Raphael: Israel-Diaspora Relations: Mutual Images, Expectation, Frustrations. See No. 56189

57260. Vogt, Stefan: Neue Forschungen zum deutschsprachigen Zionismus. Einleitung in den Schwerpunkt. [In]: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/articles.html#artikel323

57261. Vogt, Stefan: Vertraute Feinde. Zionisten und Konservative Revolutionäre in der Weimarer Republik. [In]: Zeitschrift für Geschichtswissenschaft, Vol. 61(9), 2013. Pp. 713–732

57262. Wendehorst, Stephan E. C.: British Jewry, Zionism and the Jewish State 1936–1956. Oxford/New York: Oxford University Press, 2012. XIV, 422 pp. (Oxford Historical Monographs), ISBN 978-0-1992-6530-5 [Reviewed by: Colin Shindler, in: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/rezension.html (06.05.2014). “Stephan E. C. Wendehorst explores the relationship between British Jewry and Zionism from 1936 to 1956, a crucial period in modern Jewish history encompassing both the shoah and the establishment of the State of Israel …” (provided by the publisher)]

57263. Wilhelm, Karin; Gust, Kerstin (eds.): Neue Städte für einen neuen Staat. Die städtebauliche Erfindung des modernen Israel und der Wiederaufbau in der BRD. Eine Annäherung. Bielefeld: transcript, 2013. 348 pp., illus. (Urban Studies), ISBN 978-3-8376-2204-1 [Incl. i. a.: Neue Städte für einen neuen Staat. Die städtebauliche Erfindung des modernen Israel und der Wiederaufbau in der BRD. Eine Annäherung (Karin Wilhelm; Kerstin Gust, 9–22); Deutsch-jüdische Identitäten in der ersten Hälfte des 20. Jahrhunderts (Andreas Nachama; Julius H. Schoeps, 25–33); Edgar Salin – Aspekte seines Lebens und Denkens (Anton Föllmi, 34–45); »Urbanität« in Zeiten der Krise: Der Basler Arbeitsrappen (Korinna Schönhärl, 46–63); » … Träume, die verwirklicht werden … « Salins Suche nach Urbanität (Karin Wilhelm, 64–79); Edgar Salin und das Israel Economic and Sociological Research Project (IESRP). Facetten einer Annäherung (Joachim Trezib, 80–94); Die Erfindung des modernen Israel und der Sharon-Plan. Betrachtungen über ein Unbehagen (Zvi Efrat, 95–111); Konzepte der Initiativplanung in den ersten Jahren des Staates Israel (Ruth Kark, 112–125); Planung einer »Heimstatt« für die Nation (Rachel Kallus, 126–1947); Städtebau und architektonische Kultur als Faktoren der israelischen Identitätspolitik nach 1948 (Anna Minta, 141–154); Edgar Salins Konzeption des modernen Kapitalismus. Von Marx, Sombart und Weber zu einer europäischen Perspektive für die Globalisierung (Bertram Schefold, 209–227); Zwischen Humanismus und Nationalismus. Die Rezeption völkisch-nationalen Denkens im deutschsprachigen Zionismus (Stefan Vogt, 228–236); Siedlung und Landvolk. Die agrarpolitischen Annäherungen zwischen Edgar Salin und der »Sering-Schule« (Willi Oberkrome, 237–251); Nachklänge völkisch-romantischer Naturaneignung? Von der Jugendbewegung des Kaiserreiches bis zur Umweltgeschichtsschreibung in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland (Joachim Wolschke-Bulmahn, 252–267); Zum Kulturdiskurs der Bundesrepublik Deutschland in den Jahren des Wiederaufbaus (Axel Schildt, 268–278); Die Kontroverse um Reparationen in Israel (Yaakov Sharett, 279–288); Von Deutschen, Juden und Projektionen. Zum deutsch-israelischen Verhältnis in der Nachkriegszeit (Moshe Zuckermann, 289–304); Kurzbiografien Autoren (337–344). Reviewed by: Alexandra Klei, in: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/rezension.html (06.05.2014); Ines Sonder, on: http://hsozkult.geschichte.hu-berlin.de/rezensionen/2014–1–203 (21.03.2014). “Im Zentrum steht die Initiative des aus Frankfurt am Main gebürtigen und seit 1927 in Basel lehrenden Nationalökonomen Edgar Salin (1892–1974). Im Rahmen der List-Gesellschaft … koordinierte Salin zwischen 1957 und 1968 das “Israel Economic and Sociological Research Project” (IESRP), kurz “Israel Research Project” genannt.”]

57264. WOLFFSOHN, DAVID. Meybohm, Ivonne: David Wolffsohn: Aufsteiger, Grenzgänger, Mediator. Eine biographische Annäherung an die Geschichte der frühen Zionistischen Organisation (1897–1914). Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2013. 384 pp. (Jüdische Religion, Geschichte und Kultur, Vol. 17), ISBN 978-3-525-57028-9 [Reviewed by: Kerstin Armborst-Weihs, in: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/rezension.html (06.05.2014)]

57265. Zalashik, Rakefet: Das unselige Erbe. Die Geschichte der Psychiatrie in Palästina und Israel. Frankfurt a. M.: Campus, 2012. 214 pp., ISBN 978-3-593-39361-2 [Reviewed by: Jutta Faehndrich, on: http://hsozkult.geschichte.hu-berlin.de/rezensionen/2013–3–109 (02.09.2013). “Das erste Heim für psychisch Kranke wurde Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts von philanthropischen Ehefrauen oder Töchtern führender Zionisten gegründet. Die 1895 in Jerusalem von Chaya Tzipora Pines, Rosa Feinstein und Ita Yellin gegründete Anstalt Ezrat Nashim (Frauenhilfe) blieb über 25 Jahre lang die einzige, die psychisch Kranke aufnahm. Allerdings wurde dort erst 1920 der erste ausgebildete Psychiater eingestellt, der aus Galizien stammende Dorian Feigenbaum, der bei Sigmund Freud und Emil Kraepelin studiert hatte …”]

 

New Article: Shumsky, Travel, Tourism, and Cultural Zionism in Herzl’s Altneuland

Shumsky, Dimitry. “‘This Ship Is Zion!’: Travel, Tourism, and Cultural Zionism in Theodor Herzl’s Altneuland.” Jewish Quarterly Review 104.3 (2014): 471-93.

 

URL: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/jewish_quarterly_review/v104/104.3.shumsky.html

 

 

Abstract

One of the central elements of Herzlian spatial-political thought that has been filtered out of the deterministic historiographical discourse on Herzl-the-visionary-of-the-nation-state is that of travel and tourism, as well as the cultural significance and political context of the representations of travel and tourism in his utopian-political novel Altneuland.

The present article argues, however, that it is precisely through accounting for the notions of travel and tourism at work in Theodor Herzl’s Altneuland that one can appreciate Herzl’s perception of homecoming in its full complexity. The development of this argument is divided into the following three areas: (1) a survey of the expressions of the theme of travel and tourism in Altneuland which have been largely overlooked by virtually all the historians, political scientists and literary scholars dealing with Herzl’s novel; (2) a rethinking of the cultural and political aspects of Herzlian Zionism given the appropriate assessment of the role played by the motif(s) of travel and tourism in his vision of the future Palestine, as well as placing those aspects within the wider historical context of the contemporary development of political territorially-oriented national movements in the Habsburg Central Europe where Herzlian nationalism had emerged; (3) framing discussion on the journey element in the Herzlian Zionism in terms of relevant theoretical discourse on travel, tourism and homecoming, with purpose of drawing through the case of Herzl’s employment of travel motifs some broad theoretical reflections on travel, Zionism and homecoming in the time (and space) of fin-de-siècle multiethnic empires.

 

 

 

 

New Article: Mendelson-Maoz, Asterai and the Hebrew literature of Beta Israel

Mendelson-Maoz, Adia. “The Road to ‘Yerussalem’ – Asterai and the Hebrew Literature of Beta Israel.” Social Identities (online first).

 

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13504630.2013.864465

 

Abstract

The immigration of the Beta Israel community from Ethiopia to Israel during the 1980s and the 1990s posed a challenge to Israeli society in relation to its ability to know, understand, and absorb a Jewish community with differing religious, ethnic and cultural backgrounds. For the Beta Israel, immigrating to Israel created a rift between their dream of returning to Jerusalem, a dream that would only be fulfilled after a journey of suffering, and its realization – in which they became an inferior and excluded minority within Israel. This article discusses Hebrew Ethiopian-Israeli literature, focusing on the major narrative of homecoming – the Journey to Yerussalem. This literature, which is relatively new and small, brings the voice of two generations – those who immigrated to Israel as adults, and the younger generation who were small children during the journey. Presenting various texts, and focusing on Asterai by Omri Tegamlak Avera I shall show how Ethiopian-Israeli literature constituted itself as a journey literature, contrasting the old generation with the younger generation’s identity formation as it appears in the representation of this journey narrative, constructing a more complex, ambivalent approach to the concepts of immigration and absorption, homeland and diaspora.