New Article: Erdreich, Spirituality in Teacher Training at an Islamic College in Israel

Erdreich, Lauren. “Spirituality in Teacher Training at an Islamic College in Israel.” Diaspora, Indigenous, and Minority Education 10.1 (2016): 1-13.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15595692.2015.1084921

 

Abstract

This article looks at an Islamic teacher training college in Israel in an attempt to understand how religious revival shapes women’s understandings of being Muslim women professionals in Israel. The college grew out of Islamic revival in Israel; its teacher training program reflects the sensibilities that Islamic revival hopes to foster in women who study there and in the children they will teach. The article is based on ethnographic research at the college. Adopting a theoretical approach to spirituality as a cultural phenomenon, experienced as authentic, yet culturally informed, can serve as a powerful resource for creating social meaning and as a source of pedagogies of change. I illustrate the means by which the institution makes space for a spirituality that infuses teacher training with a sense of social purpose, civil commitment, and personal unity with the divine.

 

 

 

New Article: Katzin, a Jewish Education Teachers’ Training Program for Outstanding Students

Katzin, Ori. “Teaching Approaches of Beginning Teachers for Jewish Studies in Israeli Mamlachti Schools: A Case Study of a Jewish Education Teachers’ Training Program for Outstanding Students.” Journal of Jewish Education 81.3 (2015): 285-311.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15244113.2015.1065633

 

Abstract

This article presents findings from a longitudinal qualitative study that examined teaching approaches of neophyte teachers in Israel during their 4-year exclusive teachers’ training program for teaching Jewish subjects and first two years of teaching. The program wanted to promote change in secular pupils’ attitudes toward Jewish subjects. We found a high incidence of teaching using positivistic approaches of knowledge transmission and the teachers adopted a particular teaching approach early into their training program that they continue to employ. Can teaching oriented in the transmission of central cultural value knowledge, with pupils as passive receptacles, create a meaningful encounter?

 

 

New Article: Yaffe & Burg, Problematic Internet Use and Academic Achievement among Teacher-Trainees in Israeli Colleges

Yaffe, Yosi, and David Burg. “Problematic Internet Use and Academic Achievement among Teacher-Trainees in Israeli Colleges.” International Journal of Research Studies in Psychology 4.1 (2015): 25-35.

 
URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.5861/ijrsp.2015.1020 [PDF]

 

Abstract
Digital technology has penetrated all aspects of modern culture, and it has been purported revolutionize education. However, a growing concern alludes to subtle adverse effects it may have on learning outcomes. The current work studied the association between problematic Internet use (PIU) and academic achievements among pre-service teacher trainee students (N=138) from two educational colleges in Israel. A significant interaction effect for PIU and gender was observed on students’ grades, while holding four demographic variables as covariate. These results indicate an underlying behavioral phenomenon with unique relevance in an educational context.

 

 

New Article: Backenroth and Sinclair, Knowledge in the Preparation of Israel Educators

Backenroth, Ofra and Alex Sinclair. “Vision, Curriculum, and Pedagogical Content: Knowledge in the Preparation of Israel Educators.” Journal of Jewish Education 80.2 (2014): 121-47.

 

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15244113.2014.907013

 

Abstract

In this article we explore how we as teacher educators translate a new vision of Israel education into curricular practice in the preparation of emerging Jewish educators. Using a practitioner inquiry mode of research, we reflect on our existential vision of Israel education and its translation into practice as creators and directors of a semester in Israel program. Analyzing a variety of data sources—including internal and external documents, course syllabi, the program’s experiential components, and strategic institutional partnerships, as well as students’ course papers, emails, exit interviews, and oral conversations—we find that an immersive cultural curriculum yields important outcomes for students who engage with our vision of Israel education.