Bulletin: Media coverage of/in Israel

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Book Reviews

 

Theses

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ToC: Israel Affairs 22.2 (2016)

Israel Affairs, Volume 22, Issue 2, April 2016 is now available online on Taylor & Francis Online.

This new issue contains the following articles:

Articles
Writing Jewish history
David Vital
Pages: 257-269 | DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2016.1140346
How do states die: lessons for Israel
Steven R. David
Pages: 270-290 | DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2016.1140358Towards a biblical psychology for modern Israel: 10 guides for healthy living
Kalman J. Kaplan
Pages: 291-317 | DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2016.1140349

The past as a yardstick: Europeans, Muslim migrants and the onus of European-Jewish histories
Amikam Nachmani
Pages: 318-354 | DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2016.1140355

The mental cleavage of Israeli politics
Eyal Lewin
Pages: 355-378 | DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2016.1140352

Framing policy paradigms: population dispersal and the Gaza withdrawal
Matt Evans
Pages: 379-400 | DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2016.1140353

National party strategies in local elections: a theory and some evidence from the Israeli case
David Nachmias, Maoz Rosenthal & Hani Zubida
Pages: 401-422 | DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2016.1140356

‘I have two homelands’: constructing and managing Iranian Jewish and Persian Israeli identities
Rusi Jaspal
Pages: 423-443 | DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2016.1140348

Avoiding longing: the case of ‘hidden children’ in the Holocaust
Galiya Rabinovitch & Efrat Kass
Pages: 444-458 | DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2016.1140350

‘Are you being served?’ The Jewish Agency and the absorption of Ethiopian immigration |
Adi Binhas
Pages: 459-478 | DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2016.1140345

The danger of Israel according to Sheikh Yusuf Qaradawi
Shaul Bartal
Pages: 479-491 | DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2016.1140343

Leisure in the twenty-first century: the case of Israel
Nitza Davidovitch & Dan Soen
Pages: 492-511 | DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2016.1140347

Limits to cooperation: why Israel does not want to become a member of the International Energy Agency
Elai Rettig
Pages: 512-527 | DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2016.1140357

The attitude of the local press to marginal groups: between solidarity and alienation
Smadar Ben-Asher & Ella Ben-Atar
Pages: 528-548 | DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2016.1140344

The construction of Israeli ‘masculinity’ in the sports arena
Moshe Levy, Einat Hollander & Smadar Noy-Canyon
Pages: 549-567 | DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2016.1140351
Book Reviews
From empathy to denial: Arab responses to the Holocaust
Alice A. Butler-Smith
Pages: 568-570 | DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2016.1140354

Holocaust images and picturing catastrophe: the cultural politics of seeing
Alice A. Butler-Smith
Pages: 570-572 | DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2016.1140342s

New Article: Dart, Hasbara and Israeli Sport

Dart, Jon. “‘Brand Israel’: Hasbara and Israeli Sport.” Sport in Society (early view; online first).

ְְ 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17430437.2015.1133595

 

Abstract

Until relatively recently, the state of Israel was preoccupied with its military security and paid little attention to cultural politics. However, the emergence of other ‘battlegrounds’ has seen a shift to ‘soft power’ in an attempt to generate a more benevolent global image. This paper spotlights an international sporting event which ordinarily attracts very limited interest from the mainstream media. However, when held in Israel, it created much greater interest. The paper identifies the UEFA’s Men’s U-21 tournament, held in Israel in 2013, to assess how different groups responded to the event: celebratory by the host nation and its supporters, the Israeli Football Association and UEFA; critical amongst Palestinians and their supporters in the international community. The paper identifies how the Israeli state is using ‘hasbara’ in an attempt to arrest its deteriorating international image and shows how the concept is empirically operationalized (‘hasbara in action’).

 

 

 

New Article: Samuel et al, Israeli Athletes’ and Coaches’ Perceptions of London 2012

Samuel, Roy David, Gershon Tenenbaum, and Hila Gil Bar-Mecher. “The Olympic Games as a Career Change-Event: Israeli Athletes’ and Coaches’ Perceptions of London 2012.” Psychology of Sport and Exercise (early view; online first).

 

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URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psychsport.2016.01.003

 

Extract

Objectives

This study used the Scheme of Change for Sport Psychology Practice (SCSPP; Samuel & Tenenbaum, 2011a) to examine athletes’ and coaches’ personal characteristics, perceptions of, coping with, and perceived outcome of the London 2012 Olympic Games (OGs). We also contrasted several sub-groups (e.g., Olympic and Paralympic athletes) in certain variables, and examined the decision-making and support systems involved in the OGs change process.

Design

and Methods: A cross-sectional and retrospective design was used. Israeli Olympic and Paralympic athletes and coaches (N = 61) completed measures of change-event experiences (Samuel & Tenenbaum, 2011b) and athletic/coaching identity (AI/CI; Brewer & Cornelius, 2001) two years after the London 2012 OGs.

Results

Olympic athletes trained more, and had higher motivation and AI than Paralympic athletes. The OGs were perceived as a significant and positive change-event in the participants’ careers. AI/CI was associated with the perceived significance of the OGs. At the time of Olympic qualification, the participants tended either to ignore this change-event or cope with it independently. Most participants reported making a decision to change related to adjustment and coping. Professional support was mainly available prior to and during the OGs. During this experience the participants did not consider using sport psychology services, but retrospectively, valued the usefulness of this support. Athletes’ motivation after the OGs was predicted from their satisfaction of coping, and their perceived outcome of this change-event was predicted from their satisfaction of competition results.

Conclusions

Psychological support must be provided as part of the Olympic cycle, especially in promoting a decision to change. Maintaining realistic expectations may be critical for facilitating a positive perception of this change-event.

New Article: Betzer-Tayar et al, Barriers to Women’s Access to Decision-Making Positions in Sport Organizations

Betzer-Tayar, Moran, Sima Zach, Yair Galily, and Ian Henry. “Barriers to Women’s Access to Decision-Making Positions in Sport Organizations: The Case of Establishing a Girls’ Volleyball Academy in Israel.” Journal of Gender Studies (early view; online first).

 

URL: https://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09589236.2015.1111835

 

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to highlight the nature of the barriers facing women in terms of their participation in decision-making in Israeli sport, and to identify and evaluate some of the strategies and tactics adopted to overcome these barriers. This is done by making reference to a particular case study, the case of the process of establishing a major policy initiative in Israeli sport – the founding of the national Volleyball Academy for Young Talented Girls. The case is analyzed in order to identify how and why the goal of establishing the Academy was successful, and to consider what may be learned in terms of the implications for the tactics and strategies used that might be adopted by other women in similar circumstances.

 

 

 

New Article: Lichtenstein, Zionists, Sport, and Belonging in Interwar Czechoslovakia

Lichtenstein, Tatjana. “‘An Athlete Like a Soldier Must Not Retreat’: Zionists, Sport, and Belonging in Interwar Czechoslovakia.” Shofar 34.1 (2015): 1-26.

 

URL: https://muse.jhu.edu/journals/shofar/v034/34.1.lichtenstein.html

 

Abstract

This article examines Zionists’ politics of belonging in interwar Czechoslovakia. It shows that the Jewish sports and gymnastics organization Maccabi was a vehicle for Zionists’ efforts to construct Jews’ belonging as individuals and as a collective in the new, multinational state. While Jews’ civic equality was formally guaranteed by the Czechoslovak constitution, actual, social and civic equality depended on a broader, public identification of Jews as legitimately belonging in Czechoslovakia. For Zionists, making Jews insiders, individuals that were respected as equal and loyal citizens, was contingent on Jews’ simultaneous belonging to a Jewish national and a Czechoslovak civic collective. Drawing on the ideal of the Zionist “new Jew” and on local traditions for minority nationalism, activists sought to create a symbiosis between Zionism and Czechoslovak patriotism in the 1920s and 30s.

 

 

ToC: Israel Affairs 21.4 (2015)

This new issue contains the following articles:

Articles
The journalist as a messiah: journalism, mass-circulation, and Theodor Herzl’s Zionist vision
Asaf Shamis
Pages: 483-499
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2015.1076188

The debate between Tel Aviv and Jerusalem in Mandatory Palestine (1920–48) over the re-interment of Zionist leaders
Doron Bar
Pages: 500-515
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2015.1076180

Development of information technology industries in Israel and Ireland, 2000–2010
Erez Cohen
Pages: 516-540
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2015.1076183

Israel’s nuclear amimut policy and its consequences
Ofer Israeli
Pages: 541-558
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2015.1076185

She got game?! Women, sport and society from an Israeli perspective
Yair Galily, Haim Kaufman & Ilan Tamir
Pages: 559-584
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2015.1076184

The origin of globalized anti-Zionism: A conjuncture of hatreds since the Cold War
Ernest Sternberg
Pages: 585-601
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.984419

The Diaspora and the homeland: political goals in the construction of Israeli narratives to the Diaspora
Shahar Burla
Pages: 602-619
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2015.1076181

India–Israel relations: the evolving partnership
Ashok Sharma & Dov Bing
Pages: 620-632
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2015.1076189

The design of the ‘new Hebrew’ between image and reality: a portrait of the student in Eretz Yisrael at the beginning of ‘Hebrew education’ (1882–1948)
Nirit Raichel
Pages: 633-647
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2015.1076187

The evolution of Arab psychological warfare: towards ‘nonviolence’ as a political strategy
Irwin J. Mansdorf
Pages: 648-667
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2015.1076186

Militancy and religiosity in the service of national aspiration: Fatah’s formative years
Ido Zelkovitz
Pages: 668-690
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2015.1076191

Book Reviews
The historical David: the real life of an invented hero/David, king of Israel, and Caleb in biblical memory
David Rodman
Pages: 691-693
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2015.1083700

Britain’s moment in Palestine: retrospect and perspectives, 1917–48/Palestine in the Second World War: strategic plans and political dilemmas
David Rodman
Pages: 693-696
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2015.1083701

Israeli culture on the road to the Yom Kippur War
David Rodman
Pages: 696-698
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2015.1083702

The one-state condition
Raphael Cohen-Almagor
Pages: 698-701
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2015.1083699

Globalising hatred: the new Antisemitism
Rusi Jaspal
Pages: 701-704
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2015.1083703

Psychological Warfare in the Arab-Israeli Conflict
Rusi Jaspal
Pages: 704-707
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2015.1083704

Editorial Board
Editorial Board

Pages: ebi-ebi
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2015.1109819

New Book: Ben-Porat, Women in the Football Pitch (in Hebrew)

Ben-Porat, Amir. Cosi (non) fan tutte. Women in the Football Pitch. Tel Aviv: Resling, 2015 (in Hebrew).

 

book_827_big

 

 

Women began to play soccer some time after this game was coded and turned into the game par excellence of the working class in England, and thus stirred heated emotions. The men united against them: the English Football Association banned them and its members were ordered not to cooperate with them; the male-controlled press denounced them and determined the game as not suitable for them. But nevertheless, and despite of it all, English women founded football clubs of their own and held games among themselves. Over the years, women’s soccer expanded to other Western countries, and then on to South America, Asia and Africa. One hundred and seventy-seven countries now have women’s soccer, including Israel. Women’s soccer enjoys a “relative autonomy” around the world, granted to it by national and international soccer institutions, led by men. Women achieved this autonomy through a persistent and unremitting struggle that paralleled the feminist struggle that took place on the political front, but also set apart from it. In Israel, Women’s soccer is conducted on the margins: the number of groups is not large, the budget is low, and the audience is scarce. Its status is as a leaf falling in the forest: with no one to see nor hear. And yet, during the season the players take to the field week after week, to show success in spite of it all, to themselves, and to others.

New Article: Tamir & Galily, Israeli National Identity and Football Fandom

Tamir, Ilan, and Yair Galily. “When the Private Sphere Hides from the Public Sphere: The Power Struggle between Israeli National Identity and Football Fandom.” International Review for the Sociology of Sport (early view; online first).

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1012690215588312

 

Abstract

On 13 May 2012 Israeli sports fans were deprived of one of the season’s most important soccer tournaments, after the scheduling of both legs of the UEFA Champion’s League semi-final matches overlapped with national days of remembrance. A week before, Israel’s sports channels refused to play the first leg of semi-final matches since one of the games coincided with Holocaust Remembrance Day. And, again, a week later, Israeli sports fans were confounded with the same issue, with Memorial Day coinciding with the soccer tournament’s second leg of semi-final games. It is well known that sports spectatorship is a transformative experience through which fans escape their humdrum lives, just as religious experiences help the faithful to transcend their everyday existence. In an era where alternative channels (television, Internet, etc.) are easy to find, we used in-depth interviews with sports fans to learn more about the dilemma of both public and private media expressions and watching and enjoying soccer matches while the Israeli nation is in agony. Findings reveal a whole different viewing experience whereas instead of group watching, cheering and eating together rituals, on a regular match day, an unaccompanied, quiet and even embarrassing experience was marked.

 
 
 

New Article: Hagay and Meyers, National Narrative in Coverage of Israeli National Soccer Team Matches

Hagay, Haim and Oren Meyers. “Everybody’s Team? The National Narrative in the Hebrew Press Covering Israeli National Soccer Team Matches.” Media, Culture, and Society 37.4 (2015): 530-46.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/

 

Abstract

Sports media offer a unique discourse site because the nationalistic nature of reporting is often radicalized and in most cases ‘the national flag is waved with eternal enthusiasm’. Therefore, this study examined changes in the coverage of the Israeli national soccer team between 1949 and 2006 through an exploration of the identity of the journalistic narratives’ storytellers and protagonists. Our findings illuminate a complex picture: whereas during the Israel’s formative era sports reporters pursued a patriotic narrative that praised the players for their fighting spirit and contribution to national prestige, in recent decades the sports sections echo a new variety of local, professional, and gender voices that challenge the supposedly natural hegemony of national identity. These changes can be explained by factors rooted in the fields of journalism, sports, and the politics of identity.

ToC: Israel Studies 20.2 (2015); Special Section: Bodies In Question

Israel Studies 20.2 (2015) Table of Contents:

 

Special Section: Bodies In Question

Wars of the Wombs: Struggles Over Abortion Policies in Israel (pp. 1-26)

Rebecca Steinfeld

Halutzah or Beauty Queen? National Images of Women in Early Israeli Society (pp. 27-52)

Julie Grimmeisen

‘Re-orient-ation’: Sport and the Transformation of the Jewish Body and Identity (pp. 53-75)

Yotam Hotam

‘Uniting the Nation’s Various Limbs into a National Body’ the Jerusalem People’s House (pp. 76-109)

Esther Grabiner

 

Articles

The Test of Maritime Sovereignty: The Establishment of the Zim National Shipping Company and the Purchase of the Kedmah, 1945–1952 (pp. 110-134)

Kobi Cohen-Hattab

Budgeting for Ultra-Orthodox Education—The Failure of Ultra-Orthodox Politics, 1996–2006 (pp. 135-162)

Hadar Lipshits

The Mizrahi Sociolect in Israel: Origins and Development (pp. 163-182)

Yehudit Henshke

Review Essay: The Theoretical Normalization of Israel in International Relations(pp. 183-189)

[Reviews  of: The Political Psychology of Israeli Prime Ministers: When Hard-Liners Opt for Peace, by Yael S. Aronoff; Why Hawks Become Doves: Shimon Peres and Foreign Policy Change in Israel by Guy Ziv]

Brent E. Sasley

 

Notes on Contributors (pp. 190-191)

Guidelines for Contributors (pp. 192-194)

Reviews: Spiegel, Embodying Hebrew Culture

Spiegel, Nina S. Embodying Hebrew Culture. Aesthetics, Athletics, and Dance in the Jewish Community of Mandate Palestine. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 2013.

 

getimage_1

 

Reviews:

  • Heidecker, Liora Bing. “Review.” Nashim 26 (2014): 163-165.
  • Elron, Sari. “Review.” Middle East Journal 68.1 (2014): 165-166.
  • Zer-Zion, Shelly. “Review.” Journal of Israeli History 33.2 (2014): 241-244.
  • Manor, Dalia. “Review.” Journal of Modern Jewish Studies 15.1 (2016): 159-61.

Bibliography: Leo Baeck Institute Yearbook bibliography on Zionism and Israel (2014)

Bibliography: Zionism and Israel. Published in the Leo Baeck Institute Yearbook 59 (2014): 460-466.

57203. Alroey, Gur: “Zionism without Zion”? Territorialist Ideology and the Zionist Movement, 1882–1956. [In]: Jewish Social Studies, Vol. 18(1), 2013. Pp. 1–32

57204. Al-Salim, Farid: Key to three crises: The Ha’avara Agreement, Jewish immigration, and the Peel Plan of Partition of Palestine. [In]: Journal of South Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, Vol. 37(1), 2013. Pp. 86–102

57205. Armborst-Weihs, Kerstin: The Formation of the Jewish National Movement Through Transnational Exchange: Zionism in Europe up to the First World War. [In]: Europäische Geschichte Online. http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0159–2011080820 (07.08.2014)

57206. Ashkenazi, Ofer: The Biramschule in Context – The »German« Influence on Jewish Body Culture in Mandate Palestine. [In]: Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte, Vol. 41, 2013 (Issue title: Deutsche(s) in Palästina und Israel. Alltag, Kultur, Politik. Ed. by José Brunner). Pp. 17–39

57207. Behar, Moshe; Benite, Zvi Ben-Dor (eds.): Modern Middle Eastern Jewish Thought: Writings on Identity, Politics, and Culture, 1893–1958. Waltham, MA: Brandeis University Press, 2013. XXXIX, 257 pp., ISBN 978-1-58465-884-9 / 978-1-58465-885-6 [Reviewed by: Orit Bashkin, on: https://www.h-net.org/reviews/showrev.php?id=41227 (22.05.2014). Incl. i. a.: European Zionism and the Arabs and Jews in Palestine]

57208. Ben-Ari, Nitsa: Hebrew Translations of German Classics – Attraction and Aversion. [In]: Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte, Vol. 41, 2013 (Issue title: Deutsche(s) in Palästina und Israel. Alltag, Kultur, Politik. Ed. by José Brunner). Pp. 129–142

57209. BERGMANN, ERNST DAVID. Orchin, Milton; Fenichel, Henry; Jensen, William B.: Scientist in the Service of Israel. The Life and Times of Ernst David Bergmann (1903–1975). Jerusalem: Hebrew University Magnes Press, 2011. XVIII, 374 pp., ISBN 978-965-493-580-7 [“This is the first book-length study of the life and career of the Israeli chemist Ernst David Bergmann. It traces his birth and education in Germany; his decision, after the rise of Hitler, to immigrate to Palestine rather than to accept a position at Oxford; and his intimate 18-year association with Chaim Weizmann – not only as his closest scientific associate but also as Scientific Director of both the Sieff Institute and of the Weizmann Institute …”]

57210. BERGNER, ELISABETH. Feinberg, Anat: »Von Gott begnadete Schauspielerin«: Elisabeth Bergner in Israel. [In]: Aschkenas, Vol. 21(1–2) (2011), 2013. Pp. 229–246

57211. BIRNBAUM, NATHAN. Olson, Jess: Nathan Birnbaum and Jewish Modernity: Architect of Zionism, Yiddishism, and Orthodoxy. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2013, 408 pp. (Stanford Studies in Jewish History and Culture), ISBN 978-0-8047-7873-2 [Reviewed by: Kerstin Armborst-Weihs, in: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/rezension.html (06.05.2014)]

––. BUBER, MARTIN. Wolf, Siegbert: Martin Bubers Konzeption der Binationalität (2012). See No. 55784

––. Buber, Martin: Zwei Völker in Palästina (1947). See No. 55784

57212. DUBNOW, SIMON. Jilek, Grit: Nation ohne Territorium. Über die Organisierung der jüdischen Diaspora bei Simon Dubnow. Baden-Baden: Nomos, 2013. 524 pp. (Schriftenreihe der Sektion Politische Theorien und Ideengeschichte in der Deutschen Vereinigung für Politische Wissenschaft, Vol. 24), ISBN 978-3-8329-7738-2

57213. Edelmann-Ohler, Eva: Sprache des Krieges. Deutungen des Ersten Weltkriegs in zionistischer Publizistik und Literatur (1914–1918). Zürich: ETH Zürich, 2013. 306 pp., illus. (ETH Zürich Diss. No. 20986)

57214. Eiff, Hansjörg: Die jüdische Heimstätte in Palästina in der Außenpolitik der Weimarer Republik. [In]: Zeitschrift für Geschichtswissenschaft, Vol. 61(12), 2013. Pp. 1005–1028

57215. Gechtman, Roni: Nationalising the Bund? Zionist historiography and the Jewish labour movement. [In]: East European Jewish Affairs, Vol. 43(3), 2013. Pp. 249–264 [Abstract: This article examines the academic historiography on the Jewish Workers’ Bund produced by Israeli and Zionist scholars. While the contribution of Israeli scholars to the historiography on the Bund has been significant in both quantity and quality, their works have had to grapple with the tension between the goals of Zionist historiography and the Bund’s political and ideological commitments, namely the party’s radical opposition to nationalism in general and to Zionism in particular. To various degrees, Israeli scholars sought to “nationalise” the Yiddish-speaking labour movement in Eastern Europe and incorporate it into a coherent narrative of the Jews’ past as an “organic” nation. As a result of their authors’ ideological and methodological preconceptions, and by portraying it as a nationalist movement, these works often misrepresent the Bund’s ideas, policies and activities.]

––. Graur, Mina: Anarchismus und Zionismus. Die Debatte über den jüdischen Nationalismus (2008). See No. 55784

57216. Grill, Tobias: Antizionistische jüdische Bewegungen. [In]: Europäische Geschichte Online. http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0159–2011081886 (07.08.2014)

57217. GRONEMANN, SAMMY. Kühne, Jan: “Wer ist wer?!”. Sammy Gronemanns Jakob und Christian. [In]: PaRDeS. Zeitschrift der Vereinigung für Jüdische Studien, Vol. 19, 2013 (Issue title: Galut Sepharad in Aschkenas: Sepharden im deutschsprachigen Kulturraum). Pp. 191–206 [http://opus.kobv.de/ubp/volltexte/2013/6527/ (04.09.2013)]

57218. Grüner, Frank; Hohler, Susanne: Offener Brief der zionistischen Jugendorganisation Betar an den Nationalrat der Jüdischen Gemeinden im Fernen Osten vom 25. Januar 1939. [In]: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/articles.html#artikel308

57219. Harpaz, Nathan: Zionist Architecture and Town Planning: The Building of Tel Aviv (1919–1929). West Lafayette, IN: Purdue University Press, 2013. xi, 277 pp., illus., ISBN 9781557536730

57220. Hermann, Tamar S.: Zionism and Palestinian Nationalism: Possibilities of Recognition. [In]: Israel Studies, Vol. 18(2), 2013 (Special Issue: Shared Narratives – A Palestinian-Israeli Dialogue). Pp. 133–147

57221. Herrmann, Manja: “[B]eide zu einem harmonischen Ganzen verschmolzen”: Particularism, Universalism, and the Hybrid Jewish Nation in Early German Zionist Discourse. [In]: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/articles.html#artikel323

––. HERZL, THEODOR. Ben-Ami: Herzl and the First Congress. See No. 56248

57222. HESS, MOSES; PINSKER, LEON; RÜLF, MORITZ. Schoeps, Julius H.: Pioneers of Zionism: Hess, Pinsker, Rülf. Messianism, Settlement Policy, and the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict. Translated by Margaret-Ann Schellenberg. Berlin [et al.]: de Gruyter, 2013. 158 pp., illus., ISBN 978-3-11-031458-8 [Reviewed by: Philipp von Wussow, in: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/rezension.html (06.05.2014)]

––. Hessing, Jakob: Germanistik in Israel. Aspekte einer Trauerarbeit. See No. 57755

57223. Jessen, Caroline: Bücher als Dinge. Funktionen emigrierter Bücher und Büchersammlungen für deutsch-jüdische Einwanderer in Palästina/Israel nach 1933 aus Perspektive der Kanonforschung. [In]: Exilforschung, Vol. 29, 2011. Pp. 12–27

57224. Jessen, Caroline: Das problematische Bild der geretteten Kultur – Büchersammlungen deutsch-jüdischer Einwanderer in Israel. [In]: Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte, Vol. 41, 2013 (Issue title: Deutsche(s) in Palästina und Israel. Alltag, Kultur, Politik. Ed. by José Brunner). Pp. 179

57225. Jessen, Caroline: Spuren deutsch-jüdischer Geschichte. Erschließung und Erforschung von Nachlässen und Sammlungen in Israel. [In]: Der Archivar, Vol. 66(3), 2013. Pp. 328–331

57226. Kraft, Christian: Die Synagogen Binjan Zion und Chorew – Der Konflikt zweier deutscher Einwanderergemeinden in Jerusalem. [In]: Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte, Vol. 41, 2013 (Issue title: Deutsche(s) in Palästina und Israel. Alltag, Kultur, Politik. Ed. by José Brunner). Pp. 97–126

57227. Kühne, Jan: Das Ende einer jüdischen Welttournee – Sammy Gronemann und die zionistische »Rückkehr in die Geschichte«. [In]: Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte, Vol. 41, 2013 (Issue title: Deutsche(s) in Palästina und Israel. Alltag, Kultur, Politik. Ed. by José Brunner). Pp. 143–160

57228. LASKER-SCHÜLER, ELSE; WILHELM, KURT. Kohler, George Y.: »Platzmachen für Gott« – Else Lasker-Schüler, Rabbiner Kurt Wilhelm und der religiöse Liberalismus in Palästina. [In]: Aschkenas, Vol. 21(1–2) (2011), 2013. Pp. 179–199

57229. Liebermann, Guido: La psychanalyse en Palestine 1918–1948. Aux origines du mouvement analytique israélien. Préface de Elisabeth Roudinesco. Paris: Campagne Première, 2012. 318 pp., ISBN 978-2-915789-53-9 [Incl. i. a.: L’arrivée des psychanalystes autrichiens en Palestine (1938); Traduire Freud en hébreu; Freud en Eretz Israël]

57230. Litt, Stefan: Zeugnisse deutsch-jüdischer Kulturgeschichte – Der Erwerb deutschsprachiger Privatnachlässe für die Jewish National and University Library in Jerusalem 1934–1971. [In]: Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte, Vol. 41, 2013 (Issue title: Deutsche(s) in Palästina und Israel. Alltag, Kultur, Politik. Ed. by José Brunner). Pp. 195–212

––. Luden, Josef: Israel: Zionismus & Anarchismus (1985). See No. 55784

57231. Maier-Wolthausen, Clemens: Eine unmögliche Reise. Ein Brief der Kinder- und Jugendalija in Schweden von 1940. [In]: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/articles.html#artikel308

57232. Maksymiak, Małgorzata A.: Untergangs- und Aufgangsprobleme der [sic] jüdischen Homo Europaeus. Zur zionistischen Kritik an Spenglers Geschichtsphilosophie. [In]: Zaur Gasimov; Carl Antonius Lemke Duque (Hrsg.): Oswald Spengler als europäisches Phänomen. Der Transfer der Kultur- und Geschichtsmorphologie im Europa der Zwischenkriegszeit 1919–1939. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht 2013 (Veröffentlichungen des Instituts für Europäische Geschichte Mainz, Abteilung für Universalgeschichte, Beiheft 99), ISBN 978-3-525-10126-1. Pp. 299–322

57233. Maksymiak, Malgorzata Anna: “Ezer Ke-Negdo” in Zionism: The Cases of Gerda Luft and Gabriele Tergit. [In]: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/articles.html#artikel323

57234. Maoz, Moshe: The Zionist/Jewish and Palestinian/Arab National Movements: The Question of Legitimacy – A Comparative Observation. [In]: Israel Studies, Vol. 18(2), 2013 (Special Issue: Shared Narratives – A Palestinian-Israeli Dialogue). Pp. 30–40

57235. Marzano, Arturo: Visiting British Palestine: Zionist travelers to Eretz Israel. [In]: Quest. Issues in Contemporary Jewish History, Vol. 4(6), 2013. http://www.quest-cdecjournal.it/index.php (03.03.2014)

57236. Michaels, Jennifer: An Unusual Traveler: Ida Pfeiffer’s Visit to the Holy Land in 1842. [In]: Quest. Issues in Contemporary Jewish History, Vol. 4(6), 2013. http://www.quest-cdecjournal.it/index.php (03.03.2014)

57237. Miron, Guy: Exile, Diaspora and the Promised Land: Jewish Future Images in Nazi Dominated Europe. [In]: Pál Hatos; Attila Novák (eds.): Between Minority and Majority: Hungarian and Jewish/Israeli Ethnical and Cultural Experiences in Recent Centuries. Budapest: Balassi Inst., 2013. Pp. 147–166

57238. Miskin, Edgar: Illegal Journey: From the Holocaust to Palestine in 1946. New York: Devora, 2013. 314 pp., ISBN 9789655241273

57239. MÜLLER-COHEN, ANITTA. Hecht, Dieter J.: Biographien jüdischer Frauen: Anitta Müller-Cohen (1890–1962). Sozialarbeit und Zionismus zwischen Wien und Tel Aviv. [In]: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/miscellaneous.html#artikel301

57240. Nemtsov, Jascha: Doppelt vertrieben: Deutsch-jüdische Komponisten aus dem östlichen Europa in Palästina/Israel. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 2013. 336 pp., illus., music (Jüdische Musik, Vol. 11), ISBN 978-3-447-06975-5

57241. Nittenberg, Joanna; Kaufmann, Benjamin (eds.): Trotz allem … Aron Menczer und die Jugendalijah. Wien: Edition INW, 2013. 191 pp., illus., ISBN 9783950035667 [Aron Menczer, b. 18. 04. 1917 Vienna, d. 7. 10. 1943 KZ Auschwitz-Birkenau]

57242. Or, Galia Bar; Minten-Jung, Nicole; Möller, Werner; Yasky, Yuval; Lehmann, Katja; Sonder, Ines; Oswalt, Philipp: Kibbuz und Bauhaus. Pioniere des Kollektivs. Leipzig: Spector Books, 2012. 144 S., ISBN 978-3940064448 [Reviewed by: Alexandra Klei, in: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/rezension.html (06.05.2014)]

57243. Oswalt, Philipp (ed.): bauhaus. Zeitschrift der Stiftung Bauhaus Dessau, Ausgabe 2: Israel, November 2011. 152 pp., ISBN 978-3940064295 [Reviewed by: Alexandra Klei, in: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/rezension.html (06.05.2014)]

57244. Patek, Artur: Jews on Route to Palestine 1934–1944. Sketches from the History of Aliyah Bet. Clandestine Jewish Immigration. Krakow: Jagiellonian University Press, 2012. 220 pp., ISBN 978-83-233-3390-6 [Reviewed by: Farid Al-Salim, in: American Historical Review, Vol. 119(3), 2014. Pp. 1022]

57245. Peiffer, Lorenz; Zimmermann, Moshe (eds.): Sport als Element des Kulturtransfers. Jüdische Sportler zwischen NS-Deutschland und Palästina. Göttingen: Wallstein, 2013. 249 pp., illus., ISBN 978-3-8353-1234-0 [Vorwort (Lorenz Peiffer; Moshe Zimmermann, 7–8); Einleitung (Lorenz Peiffer; Moshe Zimmermann, 9–13); Die Einsamkeit des Langstreckenläufers. Deutsch-jüdische Athleten und die Entstehung einer zionistischen (trans)nationalen Kultur (Ofer Ashkenazi, 14–48); Arthur Biram und die Einführung des Turnunterrichts in Erez Israel (Ofer Ashkenazi; Eyal Gertmann, 49–72); Die Beteiligung jüdischer Sportler aus Deutschland an der II. Makkabiah 1935 in Tel Aviv (Henry Wahlig, 73–98); Im Schatten antisemitischer Diskriminierung und Verfolgung. Sportliche Begegnungen zwischen jüdischen Mannschaften aus Nazideutschland und Erez Israel im Jahre 1937 (Eyal Gertmann; Lorenz Peiffer, 99–134); Zwischen Diaspora und Erez Israel – Fußball als Element des Kulturtransfers (Moshe Zimmermann, 135–146); »Im Turnunterricht ist ganz neu, daß man möglichst hebräische Kommandos gebrauchen möchte.« Die Veränderung des Turnunterrichts an den jüdischen Schulen im nationalsozialistischen Deutschland (Lorenz Peiffer; Nadine Werner, 147–168); Schulsport in Palästina von 1933 bis 1938 – im Spiegel von Berichten in deutsch-jüdischen Zeitungen (Lorenz Peiffer; Nadine Werner, 169–172); Dokumention. Einführung und Kommentierung der Dokumente (Ofer Ashkenazi; Eyal Gertmann; Henry Wahlig, 175–184); Dokumente: 1. Transfer von Sportarten nach Erez Israel (185); 2. Vereinsentwicklung in Erez Israel (193); 3. Jüdische Sportlerinnen und Sportler aus Deutschland bei der Makkabiah 1935 (200); 4. Sportreisen jüdischer Mannschaften nach Erez Israel nach Nazideutschland (234); 5. Sport in Palästina in den 1920er Jahren (245)]

57246. Poppe, Judith: Zwischen »unauffindbarem Gestern« und dem »Himmel voll Zuversicht«? Konzeptionen der Alten und der Neuen Heimat bei deutschsprachigen Schriftsteller/innen Israels. [In]: Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte, Vol. 41, 2013 (Issue title: Deutsche(s) in Palästina und Israel. Alltag, Kultur, Politik. Ed. by José Brunner). Pp. 161–178

––. Popper, Hans: Die freie organisierte Gemeinschaft des jüdischen Yishuv (Einwohnerschaft) in Palästina (1949). See No. 55784

57247. Rautenberg-Alianov, Viola: Schlagsahne oder Shemen-Öl? Deutsch-jüdische Hausfrauen und ihre Küche in Palästina 1936–1940. [In]: Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte, Vol. 41, 2013 (Issue title: Deutsche(s) in Palästina und Israel. Alltag, Kultur, Politik. Ed. by José Brunner). Pp. 82–96

57248. Rodov, Ilia: “With Eyes towards Zion:” Visions of the Holy Land in Romanian Synagogues. [In]: Quest. Issues in Contemporary Jewish History, Vol. 4(6), 2013. http://www.quest-cdecjournal.it/index.php (03.03.2014)

57249. Rokem, Na’ama: Prosaic Conditions: Heinrich Heine and the Spaces of Zionist Literature. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2013. XXI, 221 pp., ISBN 978-0-8101-2867-5 [Reviewed by: Allison Schachter, on: http://www.h-net.org/reviews/showpdf.php?id=42229 (19.08.2014)]

57250. Sebba-Elran, Tsafi: From Sefer Ha’aggadah to the Jewish Bookcase: Dynamics of a Cultural Change. [In]: Jewish Studies Quarterly, Vol. 20(3), 2013. Pp. 272–295 [The manifest popularity of H. N. Bialik and Y. H. Ravnitzky’s Sefer Ha’aggadah, its influence on the educational curriculum in the Yishuv and later in the State of Israel and the various languages into which it is translated all bear witness to the formative role of this book through the years in the construction of modern cultural memory … Only Sefer Ha’aggadah acquired such an influence that it became known as “the New Torah” of the Jews. This article seeks to understand and explain Bialik and Ravnitzky’s unique success in light of their literary innovations and cultural vision and to examine how they used their literary tools to bridge the historical and ideological gap between rabbinic tradition and the Jewish thought of their time … Like the romantic philosophers Herder and Schlegel, and apparently following Ahad Ha’am, Bialik and Ravnitzky related to Jewish myth and particularly to the aggadah as a national cultural heritage …]

57251. Sela-Sheffy, Rakefet: »Europeans in the Levant« Revisited – German Jewish Immigrants in 1930s Palestine and the Question of Culture Retention. [In]: Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte, Vol. 41, 2013 (Issue title: Deutsche(s) in Palästina und Israel. Alltag, Kultur, Politik. Ed. by José Brunner). Pp. 40–59

57252. Selzer, Assaf: The History of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Vol. 4: Who’s Who Prior to Statehood: Founders, Designers, Pioneers. Jerusalem: Magnes Press, 2013. 405 pp., ISBN 978-965-493-691-0

––. Shapiro, Alexander: Internationale Probleme. Palästina, England und die jüdische Frage (1930). See No. 55784

57253. Sheffi, Na’ama; Meilinger, Liliane: Vom Deutschen ins Hebräische. Übersetzungen aus dem Deutschen im Jüdischen Palästina 1882–1948. Translated by Liliane Meilinger. With a preface by Shulamit Volkov. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2011. 219 pp. (Jüdische Religion, Geschichte und Kultur, Vol. 14), ISBN 978-3-525-56938-2

57254. Shindler, Colin: The origins of Zionism. [In]: Joel Peters and David Newman (eds.): The Routledge Handbook on the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict. London [et. al.]: Routledge, 2013. ISBN 978-0-415-77862-6 / 978-0-203-07955-3. Pp. 11–19

57255. Shumsky, Dimitry: Leon Pinsker and “Autoemancipation!”: A Reevaluation. [In]: Jewish Social Studies, Vol. 18(1), 2013. Pp. 34–62

57256. Shumsky, Dimitry: Zweisprachigkeit und binationale Idee. Der Prager Zionismus 1900–1930. Transl. from the Hebrew by Dafna Mach. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2013. 336 pp. (Schriften des Simon-Dubnow-Instituts, Vol. 14), ISBN 978-352-53695-5-5 / 978-3-647-36955-6 (online resource) [Reviewed by: Martha Stellmacher. in: PaRDeS. Zeitschrift der Vereinigung für Jüdische Studien, Vol. 20, 2014. Pp. 175–176; Romy Langeheine, on: http://hsozkult.geschichte.hu-berlin.de/rezensionen/2014–2–188 (20.06.2014). “Die deutsche Übersetzung von Dimitry Shumskys 2005 an der Universität Haifa entstandener geschichtswissenschaftlicher Dissertation, die 2010 erstmalig auf Hebräisch erschien, macht nun auch der deutschen Leserschaft eine innovative Studie zum Prager Zionismus und den Anfängen der binationalen Idee als Lösungsmöglichkeit des jüdisch-arabischen Konflikts in Palästina zugänglich. Dieser Lösungsansatz wurde insbesondere von Mitgliedern des 1925 in Jerusalem gegründeten Intellektuellenzirkels Brith Schalom verfolgt, die bereits zu dieser Zeit auf die Dringlichkeit der Aussöhnung zwischen Juden und Arabern hinwiesen und verschiedene politische Programme dazu ausarbeiteten …”]

57257. Siegemund, Anja: Eine Bürgergesellschaft für den Jischuw – Deutsche liberalnationale Zionisten in Palästina. [In]: Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte, Vol. 41, 2013 (Issue title: Deutsche(s) in Palästina und Israel. Alltag, Kultur, Politik. Ed. by José Brunner). Pp. 60–81

57258. Sonder, Ines: “Das wollten wir. Ein neues Land …” Deutsche Zionistinnen als Pionierinnen in Palästina, 1897–1933. [In]: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/articles.html#artikel323

57259. Stahl, Neta: Other and Brother: Jesus in the 20th-Century Jewish Literary Landscape. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012. 248 pp., ISBN 978-0-19-976000-8 [Reviewed by Adele Reinhartz, on: https://www.h-net.org/reviews/showrev.php?id=3D39833 (25.01.2014). Incl. i. a.: The positive appropriation of Jesus by Zionist authors like Uri Zvi Greenberg (1896–1981), Yoel Hoffman (b. 1937), Avot Yeshurun (1904–1992), and others]

––. THEILHABER, FELIX ARON. Heuer, Renate: Eroberung des neuen Judentums für Israel – Felix Aron Theilhaber. See No. 57014

––. Vago, Raphael: Israel-Diaspora Relations: Mutual Images, Expectation, Frustrations. See No. 56189

57260. Vogt, Stefan: Neue Forschungen zum deutschsprachigen Zionismus. Einleitung in den Schwerpunkt. [In]: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/articles.html#artikel323

57261. Vogt, Stefan: Vertraute Feinde. Zionisten und Konservative Revolutionäre in der Weimarer Republik. [In]: Zeitschrift für Geschichtswissenschaft, Vol. 61(9), 2013. Pp. 713–732

57262. Wendehorst, Stephan E. C.: British Jewry, Zionism and the Jewish State 1936–1956. Oxford/New York: Oxford University Press, 2012. XIV, 422 pp. (Oxford Historical Monographs), ISBN 978-0-1992-6530-5 [Reviewed by: Colin Shindler, in: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/rezension.html (06.05.2014). “Stephan E. C. Wendehorst explores the relationship between British Jewry and Zionism from 1936 to 1956, a crucial period in modern Jewish history encompassing both the shoah and the establishment of the State of Israel …” (provided by the publisher)]

57263. Wilhelm, Karin; Gust, Kerstin (eds.): Neue Städte für einen neuen Staat. Die städtebauliche Erfindung des modernen Israel und der Wiederaufbau in der BRD. Eine Annäherung. Bielefeld: transcript, 2013. 348 pp., illus. (Urban Studies), ISBN 978-3-8376-2204-1 [Incl. i. a.: Neue Städte für einen neuen Staat. Die städtebauliche Erfindung des modernen Israel und der Wiederaufbau in der BRD. Eine Annäherung (Karin Wilhelm; Kerstin Gust, 9–22); Deutsch-jüdische Identitäten in der ersten Hälfte des 20. Jahrhunderts (Andreas Nachama; Julius H. Schoeps, 25–33); Edgar Salin – Aspekte seines Lebens und Denkens (Anton Föllmi, 34–45); »Urbanität« in Zeiten der Krise: Der Basler Arbeitsrappen (Korinna Schönhärl, 46–63); » … Träume, die verwirklicht werden … « Salins Suche nach Urbanität (Karin Wilhelm, 64–79); Edgar Salin und das Israel Economic and Sociological Research Project (IESRP). Facetten einer Annäherung (Joachim Trezib, 80–94); Die Erfindung des modernen Israel und der Sharon-Plan. Betrachtungen über ein Unbehagen (Zvi Efrat, 95–111); Konzepte der Initiativplanung in den ersten Jahren des Staates Israel (Ruth Kark, 112–125); Planung einer »Heimstatt« für die Nation (Rachel Kallus, 126–1947); Städtebau und architektonische Kultur als Faktoren der israelischen Identitätspolitik nach 1948 (Anna Minta, 141–154); Edgar Salins Konzeption des modernen Kapitalismus. Von Marx, Sombart und Weber zu einer europäischen Perspektive für die Globalisierung (Bertram Schefold, 209–227); Zwischen Humanismus und Nationalismus. Die Rezeption völkisch-nationalen Denkens im deutschsprachigen Zionismus (Stefan Vogt, 228–236); Siedlung und Landvolk. Die agrarpolitischen Annäherungen zwischen Edgar Salin und der »Sering-Schule« (Willi Oberkrome, 237–251); Nachklänge völkisch-romantischer Naturaneignung? Von der Jugendbewegung des Kaiserreiches bis zur Umweltgeschichtsschreibung in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland (Joachim Wolschke-Bulmahn, 252–267); Zum Kulturdiskurs der Bundesrepublik Deutschland in den Jahren des Wiederaufbaus (Axel Schildt, 268–278); Die Kontroverse um Reparationen in Israel (Yaakov Sharett, 279–288); Von Deutschen, Juden und Projektionen. Zum deutsch-israelischen Verhältnis in der Nachkriegszeit (Moshe Zuckermann, 289–304); Kurzbiografien Autoren (337–344). Reviewed by: Alexandra Klei, in: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/rezension.html (06.05.2014); Ines Sonder, on: http://hsozkult.geschichte.hu-berlin.de/rezensionen/2014–1–203 (21.03.2014). “Im Zentrum steht die Initiative des aus Frankfurt am Main gebürtigen und seit 1927 in Basel lehrenden Nationalökonomen Edgar Salin (1892–1974). Im Rahmen der List-Gesellschaft … koordinierte Salin zwischen 1957 und 1968 das “Israel Economic and Sociological Research Project” (IESRP), kurz “Israel Research Project” genannt.”]

57264. WOLFFSOHN, DAVID. Meybohm, Ivonne: David Wolffsohn: Aufsteiger, Grenzgänger, Mediator. Eine biographische Annäherung an die Geschichte der frühen Zionistischen Organisation (1897–1914). Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2013. 384 pp. (Jüdische Religion, Geschichte und Kultur, Vol. 17), ISBN 978-3-525-57028-9 [Reviewed by: Kerstin Armborst-Weihs, in: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/rezension.html (06.05.2014)]

57265. Zalashik, Rakefet: Das unselige Erbe. Die Geschichte der Psychiatrie in Palästina und Israel. Frankfurt a. M.: Campus, 2012. 214 pp., ISBN 978-3-593-39361-2 [Reviewed by: Jutta Faehndrich, on: http://hsozkult.geschichte.hu-berlin.de/rezensionen/2013–3–109 (02.09.2013). “Das erste Heim für psychisch Kranke wurde Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts von philanthropischen Ehefrauen oder Töchtern führender Zionisten gegründet. Die 1895 in Jerusalem von Chaya Tzipora Pines, Rosa Feinstein und Ita Yellin gegründete Anstalt Ezrat Nashim (Frauenhilfe) blieb über 25 Jahre lang die einzige, die psychisch Kranke aufnahm. Allerdings wurde dort erst 1920 der erste ausgebildete Psychiater eingestellt, der aus Galizien stammende Dorian Feigenbaum, der bei Sigmund Freud und Emil Kraepelin studiert hatte …”]

 

New Article: Mitelpunkt, US Visions of Israeli Soldiers and the Cold War Liberal Consensus

Mitelpunkt, Shaul. “The Tank Driver who Ran with Poodles: US Visions of Israeli Soldiers and the Cold War Liberal Consensus, 1958–79.” Gender & History 26.3 (2014): 620-641.

 

URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1468-0424.12091/abstract

 

Excerpt

The liberal re-evaluations of Israeli society and of US responsibility towards Israel depended on the changing fortunes of Israel’s wars, as well as on the sharp shift in values and social order triggered by the increasingly wrenching Vietnam War. The depreciation in liberal understandings of warfare as a potentially constructive social endeavour fed a liberal wish to see the United States as the champion of negotiation and civility, and to purge still vexing memories of the Vietnam War. Perceptions and geostrategic developments fed one another in unpredictable ways. Supporting Israel, whether that support was expressed in enthusiasm for the Israeli citizen-soldier in the late 1960s, or in negotiating peace between Israel and Egypt in the late 1970s, was not purely a matter of geostrategic calculation, nor one of domestic politics. It was also a way for Cold War liberals and later post-Vietnam liberals to fashion themselves as forces for good in the world.

In many ways, the US commitment to mediating peaceful agreements between Israel and its neighbours was more performance than policy: the United States reinforced its military support to Israel in the 1980s and came to see it as an ally within the ‘War on Terror’. Yet even as neoconservative ascendency and explicit military alliance came to define the ideological basis of US-Israeli relations through the 1980s and beyond, the ambition to conceive of the US as a tireless and responsible mediator, as originally envisioned by post-Vietnam liberals, remained a key part of the way Americans saw their patronage of Israel in the decades that followed.

By making, watching and identifying with the story of Ari Ben Canaan in Exodus, Cold War liberals were invited to see themselves as the benevolent patrons to emerging young states in the postcolonial world; by describing Israeli soldiers such as Yossi Israeli as colourful figures who managed to combine the uniformity of national military service and the liberties of individual choice, writers such as Mauldin and Friendly eulogised the Second World War citizen-soldier model in the United States during the midst of the Vietnam War. Finally, in the mid-1970s, by identifying Israel as ‘Spartan’ and assuming the authority of ‘marriage councilors’ to Arabs and Israelis, post-Vietnam liberals branded the United States as a civilian superpower wielding the pen and not the napalm. Each construction was informed both by changing American experiences and by events in the Middle East.

 

ToC: Journal of Israeli History 33.2 (2014)

Journal of Israeli History 33.2 (2014): Table of Contents

 

Articles

Communists and the 1948 War: PCP, Maki, and the National Liberation League

Ilana Kaufman
pages 115-144

Mapam in the War of Independence: From the war front to the opposition back benches

The Israeli left between culture and politics: Tzavta and Mapam, 1956–1973

Tal Elmaliach
pages 169-183

From Yekke to Zionist: Narrative strategies in life stories of Central European Jewish women immigrants to Mandate Palestine

Dorit Yosef
pages 185-208

“Operation Exodus”: Israeli government involvement in the production of Otto Preminger’s Film Exodus (1960)

Giora Goodman
pages 209-229

Book Reviews

1929: Shnat ha-efes ba-sikhsukh ha-yehudi-aravi [1929: Year zero of the Jewish-Arab conflict]

Motti Golani
pages 231-235

 Menachem Begin: A Life

Representing Israel in Modern Egypt: Ideas, Intellectuals and Foreign Policy from Nasser to Mubarak

Uriya Shavit
pages 238-241

Embodying Hebrew Culture: Aesthetics, Athletics, and Dance in the Jewish Community of Mandate Palestine

Shelly Zer-Zion
pages 241-244

Editorial Board

Editorial Board
page ebi

Cite: Spiegel, Constructing the City of Tel Aviv

Spiegel, Nina S. “Constructing the City of Tel Aviv: Urban Space, Physical Culture and the Natural and Built Environment.” Rethinking History 16.4 (2012): 497-516.

 

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13642529.2012.697279

 

Abstract

This article investigates the intersection of space, culture and the moving body in Tel Aviv during the British Mandate of Palestine. Established in 1909 as a garden suburb of Jaffa, by the 1920s Tel Aviv had become the dynamic cultural and economic center of the Jewish community in Palestine. The culture of Tel Aviv was highly influenced by its natural setting but, as the ‘first Hebrew city’, it was also impacted by the processes of urbanization. Through analysis of a variety of developments in the physical culture arena, this article uncovers how the burgeoning metropolis both drew from and shaped the physical environment.

Cite: Galily et al., Socio-Cultural Characteristics of Physical Activity Habits in Israel

Galily, Yair, Ilan Tamir, Yoav Meckel, and Alon Eliakim. “Socio-Cultural Characteristics of Physical Activity Habits in Israel (1992-2008)." International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy 32.7 (2012): 461-479.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/01443331211249084

 

Abstract

Purpose – In spite of the fact that the health, mental, and educational benefits of physical activity are well documented, information is still lacking regarding the physical activity patterns in Israeli society. The purpose of the present study is to shed light on the changes of physical activity practices between the years 1992-2008 and to analyze the main reasons for such changes.

Design/methodology/approach – A survey was conducted among 501 adults (ages 18-69) representing the Jewish Hebrew-speaking population of Israel.

Findings – The percentage of Israelis who engaged in physical activity more than doubled between 1992 and 2008. Almost 56 percent of Israelis took part in some activity on a regular basis in 2008.

Originality/value – This investigation of some of these factors uncovers a cultural transformation as well as demographic, global, and cognitive processes, all of which affected and reflected upon physical activity in Israeli society during that period.

ToC: Israel Affairs 18,4 (2012)

Israel Affairs, Vol. 18, No. 4, 01 Oct 2012 is now available on Taylor & Francis Online.

This new issue contains the following articles:

Original Articles

Existential threats to Israel: learning from the ancient past
Steven R. David
Pages: 503-525
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.717386

Leadership, preventive war and territorial expansion: David Ben-Gurion and Levi Eshkol
Shlomo Aronson
Pages: 526-545
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.717387

‘Two & three air raids daily. What a bother’: an American diplomat in Israel during the War of Independence
Henry D. Fetter
Pages: 546-562
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.717388

The failed Palestinian–Israeli peace process 1993–2011: an Israeli perspective
Raphael Cohen-Almagor
Pages: 563-576
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.717389

The birth of the core issues: the West Bank and East Jerusalem under Israeli administration 1967–76 (part 1)
Moshe Elad
Pages: 577-595
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.717390

The social representation of incapacity: a psycho-cultural analysis of Israel’s political arena
Mira Moshe
Pages: 596-614
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.717391

The advent of Israel’s commercial lobby
Hila Tal
Pages: 615-628
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.717392

The games must go on? The influence of terror attacks on hosting sporting events in Israel
Yair Galily, Ilan Tamir & Moshe Levy
Pages: 629-644
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.717393

Combat stress reactions during the 1948 war: a conspiracy of silence?
Eldad Rom & Dan Bar-On
Pages: 645-651
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.717394

The US, Hezbollah and the idea of sub-state terrorism
Hussain Sirriyeh
Pages: 652-662
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.717395

Book Reviews

India’s Israel policy
David Rodman
Pages: 663-665
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.718493

The West and the Middle East
David Rodman
Pages: 665-666
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.718494

Nation and history: Israeli historiography between Zionism and post-Zionism
David Rodman
Pages: 666-667
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.718495

Israeli statecraft: national security challenges and responses
David Rodman
Pages: 667-668
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.718496

Confidential: the life of secret agent turned Hollywood tycoon Arnon Milchan
David Rodman
Pages: 669-669
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.718497

The anatomy of Israel’s survival
David Rodman
Pages: 669-670
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.718498

Perspectives of psychological operations (PSYOP) in contemporary conflicts: essays in winning hearts and minds
David Rodman
Pages: 670-671
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.718499

Holy wars: 3000 years of battles in the holy land
David Rodman
Pages: 671-671
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.718500

Crossroads: the future of the U.S.–Israel strategic partnership
David Rodman
Pages: 671-673
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.718501

Israel’s national security law: political dynamics and historical development
David Rodman
Pages: 673-674
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.718502

Cite: Ashkenazi, German Jewish Athletes and the Formation of Zionist (Trans-)National Culture

Ashkenazi, Ofer. “German Jewish Athletes and the Formation of Zionist (Trans-)National Culture.” Jewish Social Studies 17.3 (2011): 124-55.

 

URL: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/jewish_social_studies/v017/17.3.ashkenazi.html

 

Abstract

Despite the popularity of Zionist sports clubs and the incorporation of athletic activity as an essential component within the Zionist ethos, Jewish sports in pre-1948 Palestine have been allotted a relatively minor place in Zionist historiography. One reason for this marginalization is the convoluted institutionalization of Zionist sports and the tensions it embedded between various perceptions of identity (national, transnational, regional, and political). Such tensions exerted a crucial influence on the ways Zionism was experienced and interpreted by the numerous people who practiced, taught, trained, and watched sports before and after their immigration to Palestine. This article underscores the roles of sports in the Central European Zionist activism and imagination in order to present a twofold argument. First, sports provided a distinctive realm that enabled Jewish immigrants from Central Europe to assimilate into the Zionist national culture in Palestine and to influence significantly the shape of this culture. Second, for many of the German-speaking newcomers to Palestine in the 1930s, sports also provided a unique discursive sphere in which several perceptions of identity could coexist under the umbrella of Jewish nationalism.

Cite: Rokem, The Violin Player, the Soccer Game and the Wall-Graffiti

Rokem, Freddie. "The Violin Player, the Soccer Game and the Wall-Graffiti. Rhetorical Strategies in the Border-Regions between Israel and Palestine." Arcadia. International Journal for Literary Studies 45.2 (2011): 326-38.

 

URL: http://www.reference-global.com/doi/abs/10.1515/ARCA.2010.019

 

Abstract

This contribution examines an incident at a roadblock which took place in November 2004, documented in a short video and was also reproduced as a still in Israeli media. This image immediately became broadly discussed and contested. It shows a young Palestinian man playing a violin at a check point while a group of Israeli soldiers are standing and guarding the place. This image was drawn into larger clusters of signification where the rhetorical strategies employed become both quite complex and ambiguous. The image became contextualized within discourses of conflict, creating what Walter Benjamin in his Passagenwerk termed “constellations.” – Besides presenting this notion and its hermeneutic potentials my article examines the historical associations of the image, arguing that the associations with the Holocaust are actually a way to minimize the pain and suffering of the Palestinians under Israeli occupation rather than highlighting them in a broader universal context. – Another aspect of this image is connected to the technologies of creating and disseminating images of conflict/occupation and how they affect the ethical discussions surrounding this incident. I will argue that historical constellations tend to obscure rather than sharpen the ethical dimensions of images like the Palestinian violin player at the check point. – A number of graffiti paintings on the separation wall, in particular by the British graffiti artist Bansky, as well as a cellphone advertisement featuring the separation wall will be examined in order to contextualize the discourses of conflict and occupation.