ToC: Israel Affairs 19,2 (2013)

 
Israel Affairs, Vol. 19, No. 2, 01 Apr 2013 is now available on Taylor & Francis Online. This new issue contains the following articles:

Original Articles

Anti-Semitism and anti-Zionism in Iran

Rusi Jaspal Pages: 231-258 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.778085

 

In defence of the idea of a Jewish state

Mordechai Nisan Pages: 259-272 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.778088 : 273-289 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.778089

 

The status of Arabic in the discourse of Israeli policymakers

Dafna Yitzhaki Pages: 290-305 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.778091

 

Oversight by the State Control Committee in the Israeli parliament: form of accountability under stress

Chen Friedberg Pages: 306-320 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.778083

 

Israeli stamps 1948–2010: between nationalism and cosmopolitanism

Einat Lachover & Dalia Gavriely Nuri Pages: 321-337 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.778086

 

Advertising as a semiotic system of space: image of the desert in Israeli advertising, 1967–2004

Avivit Agam Dali Pages: 338-352 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.778082

 

The transformation of the Israeli Civil Guard into a police force

Yaffa Moskovich Pages: 353-363 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.778087

 

Between self-interest and international norms: legitimizing the PLO

Ogen S. Goldman Pages: 364-378 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.778084

 

 

Book Reviews

 

Sharon: the life of a leader David Rodman

Pages: 379-380 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.778092

 

A lasting reward: memoirs of an Israeli diplomat

David Rodman Pages: 380-381 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.778093

The horsemen of Israel: horses and chariotry in monarchic Israel (ninth-eighth centuries BCE)

David Rodman Pages: 381-382 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.778095

 

In the sands of the Sinai: a physician’s account of the Yom Kippur war

David Rodman Pages: 382-383 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.778096

 

Israel’s silent defender: an inside look at sixty years of Israeli intelligence

David Rodman Pages: 383-384 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.778097

 

Brothers at war: Israel and the tragedy of the Altalena

David Rodman Pages: 385-386 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.778098

 

Israel: an introduction

David Rodman Pages: 386-387 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.778099

 

Only Israel west of the river: the Jewish state and the Palestinian question

David Rodman Pages: 387-388 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.778100

 

Israel and the United States: six decades of US–Israeli relations

David Rodman Pages: 388-389 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.778101

 

Nine lives of Israel: a nation’s history through the lives of its foremost leaders

David Rodman Pages: 390-391 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.778102

 

Israel’s Palestinians

Raphael Cohen-Almagor Pages: 391-392 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.751734

Enjoy FREE ONLINE ACCESS to all Routledge articles published on the Arab Spring in the last year. Start reading now.

 

Reviews: Waisman, Body, Language and Meaning in Conflict Situations

 

Waisman, Orit Sônia. Body, Language and Meaning in Conflict Situations. A Semiotic Analysis of Gesture-Word Mismatches in Israeli-Jewish and Arab Discourse. Studies in Functional and Structural Linguistics,62. Amsterdam and Philadelphia: John Benjamins, 2010.

 

sfsl_62_hb

 

URL: http://benjamins.com/#catalog/books/sfsl.62/main

 

Reviews

  • Kuśmierczyk, Ewa. “Review.” Discourse Studies 14.6 (2012): 807-808.

Cite: Tawil-Souri, Politics of ID Cards in Palestine-Israel

Tawil-Souri, Helga. “Colored Identity. The Politics and Materiality of ID Cards in Palestine/Israel.” Social Text 29.2 (2011): 67-97.

 

URL: http://socialtext.dukejournals.org/cgi/content/short/29/2_107/67

 

 

Abstract

In Palestine/Israel, different colored identification cards are mandated by the Israeli state apparatus to Palestinians in the West Bank, the Gaza Strip, East Jerusalem, and those who are citizens of Israel. The article traces the development of the bureaucracy of the Palestinian ID card since the establishment of Israel and suggests that modern-day ID cards in Palestine/Israel are physical and visible instruments of a widespread low-tech surveillance mechanism to control mobility and a principal means for discriminating, both positively and negatively, subjects’ privileges and rights. ID cards are both the spaces in which Palestinians confront, tolerate, and sometimes challenge the Israeli state, and a mechanism through which Palestinian spatiality, territoriality, and corporeality are penetrated by the Israeli regime. Vital in the control and differentiation of Palestinian populations, what makes ID cards unique in the Palestinian/Israeli case is that their materiality is one of their most important and resonant aspects. The article describes various representations of the ID cards, for example in poetry and in murals, to show how they also function as sites of remediation, spaces and moments of renegotiation for their bearers, subject to counter-hegemonic representations, interpretations, and uses. As a special kind of material object, ID cards are an effective and low-tech means of surveillance and differentiation and an important nexus of Israeli power, demonstrating the institutional materiality of the state apparatus’s constitution in subjects’ everyday life; but they have also become important because they allow a poetics of political resistance.