New Article: Harris, Opening Up Geographies of the Three-Dimensional City

Harris, Andrew. “Vertical Urbanisms. Opening Up Geographies of the Three-Dimensional City.” Progress in Human Geography 39.5 (2015): 601-20.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0309132514554323

 

Abstract

This paper develops a more diverse and multi-dimensional agenda for understanding and researching urban verticality. In particular, it argues for vertical geographies that encompass more than issues of security and segregation and are not necessarily framed by the three-dimensional politics of Israel/Palestine identified by some commentators. In opening up a wider world of vertical urbanisms, the paper outlines three key approaches: close attention to where urban verticality is theorised and the relationship between power and height, the importance of ethnographic detail to emphasise more everyday verticalities and disrupt top-down analytical perspectives, and geographical imaginations that carefully attend to the myriad spatial entanglements of the three-dimensional city.

 

 

ToC: Israel Journal of Foreign Affairs 9,1 (2015)

Israel Journal of Foreign Affairs, in its first publication with Routledge, is pleased to announce a new issue:

 

From the Editor

Dr. Laurence Weinbaum, Chief Editor

pages 1-2

Huntington’s “Clash of Civilizations” in Europe: From Controversial Theory to Grim Reality
Oded Eran
pages 3-6

 

Israel  Affairs
Israel’s National Security: Challenges and Assets
Dan Schueftan
pages 7-28
The Delegitimization of Israel: Diplomatic Warfare, Sanctions, and Lawfare
Matthew S. Cohen & Charles D. Freilich
pages 29-48
Middle Eastern Currents
Cracks in the Crescent: The Looming Sectarian Clash between Khilafah and Imamah
Dimitar Mihaylov
pages 49-61
Iran and the Arab Gulf States: Change amidst Continuity
Yoel Guzansky
pages 63-74
Bilateral Relations
Israel and Cuba: A New Beginning?
Margalit Bejarano
pages 75-85
Reflections on Czech–Israeli Relations in Light of EU Policies
Lubomír Zaorálek
pages 87-89
Jewish Affairs
Holocaust Restitution: The End Game II?
Aharon Mor
pages 91-97
Reviews
The Journey to the Arab Spring: The Ideological Roots of the Middle East Upheaval in Arab Liberal Thought, by David Govrin
Nir Boms, Research Fellow
pages 99-102
Egyptian Foreign Policy from Mubarak to Morsi: Against the National Interest, by Nael M. Shama
Terry Newman
pages 103-106
The Next War between Israel and Egypt: Examining a High-intensity War between two of the Strongest Militaries in the Middle East, by Ehud Eilam
David Rodman
pages 107-108
Iranian Foreign Policy during Ahmadinejad: Ideology and Actions, by Maaike Warnaar & Iranian Foreign Policy since 2001: Alone in the World, edited by Thomas Juneau and Sam Razavi
Aryeh Levin
pages 109-115
The Hague Odyssey: Israel’s Struggle for Security on the Front Lines of Terrorism and Her Battle for Justice at the United Nations, by Richard D. Heiderman
Howard M. Weisband
pages 117-121
Uncivil War: The Israel Conflict in the Jewish Community, by Keith Kahn-Harris
Robbie Sabel
pages 123-126
Britain’s Moment in Palestine: Retrospect and Perspectives, 1917–48, by Michael J. Cohen
Aharon Klieman
pages 127-131
Nazis, Islamists, and the Making of the Modern Middle East, by Barry Rubin and Wolfgang G. Schwanitz
Matthias Küntzel
pages 133-137
Diary of a Foreign Minister, by Bob Carr
Jeremy Jones
pages 139-142
Jews and the Military: A History, by Derek J. Penslar
Stephen G. Fritz
pages 143-145
Armed Political Organizations: From Conflict to Integration, by Benedetta Berti
Rashmi Singh, Lecturer
pages 147-150
Dynamics of Asymmetric Territorial Conflict: The Evolution of Patience, by Uri Resnick
Melanie Carina Schmoll
pages 151-153
Letters
Letters by Daphna Sharfman, Simon Geissbühler, and Yisrael Medad
pages 155-160

New Article: Yi and Phillips, The BDS Campaign against Israel: Lessons from South Africa

Yi, Joseph E. and Joe Phillips. “The BDS Campaign against Israel: Lessons from South Africa.” PS: Political Science & Politics 48.2 (2015): 306-310.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1049096514002091

 

Abstract

The Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions (BDS) campaign against Israel is animated by a pragmatic strain that views external sanctions as effective pressure against a small democratic state and by a moralistic Manichean strain that portrays Israelis as oppressors. Both strains hearken back to the earlier campaign against apartheid in South Africa. We argue that doing so misreads the lessons of South Africa. Sanctions may have contributed to ending apartheid, but they operated in conjunction with improved security and interpersonal trust among negotiators. Key contenders moved from a discourse of oppression to one that humanized one another as partners with legitimate concerns. These conditions are missing from the Israeli–Palestinian conflict. Both sides consider their security to be precarious and they are locked in competing narratives of victimization, which further erode mutual trust and security. Measures to improve the parties’ security and trust would contribute to mutual concessions and greater justification for sanctions if the Israeli government is intransigent.

New Article: Müller, Informal Security Governance and the Middle East Quartet

Müller, Patrick. “Informal Security Governance and the Middle East Quartet: Survival of the Unfittest?” International Peacekeeping 21.4 (2014): 464-80.

 

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13533312.2014.951544

 

Excerpt

Indeed, the first political initiatives of the Quartet were promising. The design of the Quartet’s Roadmap plan – which drew on US ideas but also involved strong input from the other Quartet members (especially the EU) – sought to implement lessons learned from the failed Oslo process. Trying to correct past mistakes, it introduced third party monitoring by the Quartet, the parallel implementation of obligations and a clear commitment to a two state settlement by 2005.
Moreover, coordinated action by the Quartet facilitated a number of long overdue reforms of the PA, curtailing the extensive powers of President Yasser Arafat in the run-up to the Roadmap. Simultaneously, the Quartet got a reluctant Israeli government to sign up to the Roadmap initiative, despite several reservations expressed by then prime minister Ariel Sharon.
Yet almost from the outset, the Roadmap process lacked guidance by the Quartet. Despite its formal commitment to the Roadmap initiative, the USA conducted a series of steps that severely undermined its implementation.

The freeze of the Roadmap process so soon after its launch almost instantly undermined the Quartet’s diplomatic standing. The disengagement initiative was subsequently coordinated between Israel and the USA. The Quartet, in turn, was relegated to a supportive actor assisting in the transfer of power from Israel to the PA in the Gaza Strip that was completed in September 2005. Moving back into the Roadmap process after Israel’s disengagement from Gaza proved unfeasible and was not supported by Israel’s prime minister. Israel favoured a unilateral approach over resuming negotiations with the Palestinians, coordinating its policies with the USA. As a result, the unrelenting backing of the Roadmap in the Quartet’s declarations and statements increasingly appeared out of sync with political reality.

 

New Book: LeVine and Mossberg, eds. One Land, Two States

LeVine, Mark and Mathias Mossberg, eds. One Land, Two States. Israel and Palestine as Parallel States. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2014.

 

onelandtwostatescover

 

Abstract

One Land, Two States imagines a new vision for Israel and Palestine in a situation where the peace process has failed to deliver an end of conflict. “If the land cannot be shared by geographical division, and if a one-state solution remains unacceptable,” the book asks, “can the land be shared in some other way?”

Leading Palestinian and Israeli experts along with international diplomats and scholars answer this timely question by examining a scenario with two parallel state structures, both covering the whole territory between the Mediterranean and the Jordan River, allowing for shared rather than competing claims of sovereignty. Such a political architecture would radically transform the nature and stakes of the Israel-Palestine conflict, open up for Israelis to remain in the West Bank and maintain their security position, enable Palestinians to settle in all of historic Palestine, and transform Jerusalem into a capital for both of full equality and independence—all without disturbing the demographic balance of each state. Exploring themes of security, resistance, diaspora, globalism, and religion, as well as forms of political and economic power that are not dependent on claims of exclusive territorial sovereignty, this pioneering book offers new ideas for the resolution of conflicts worldwide.

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations
Foreword: Two States on One Land—Parallel States as an Option for Israel and Palestine
Álvaro de Soto

Preface
Mathias Mossberg and Mark LeVine

1. One Land—Two States? An Introduction to the Parallel States Concept
Mathias Mossberg

2. Can Sovereignty Be Divided?
Jens Bartelson

3. Parallel Sovereignty: Dividing and Sharing Core State Functions
Peter Wallensteen

4. Security Strategy for the Parallel States Project: An Israeli Perspective
Nimrod Hurvitz and Dror Zeevi

5. Palestinian National Security
Hussein Agha and Ahmad Samih Khalidi

6. An Israel-Palestine Parallel States Economy by 235
Raja Khalidi

7. Economic Considerations in Implementing a Parallel States Structure
Raphael Bar-El

8. Parallel Sovereignty in Practice: Judicial Dimensions of a Parallel States Structure
Various authors, compiled by Mathias Mossberg

9. Religion in the Palestinian-Israeli Conflict: From Obstacle to Peace to Force for Reconciliation?
Mark LeVine and Liam O’Mara IV

10. The Necessity for Thinking outside the Box
Hiba Husseini

11. Parallel Lives, Parallel States: Imagining a Different Future
Eyal Megged

Contributors
Index

 

New Article: Clarno, Policing Precariousness in South Africa and Palestine/Israel

Clarno, Andy. “Beyond the State: Policing Precariousness in South Africa and Palestine/Israel.” Ethnic and Racial Studies 37.10 (2014): 1725-1731.

 

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01419870.2014.931984

 

Abstract

This short comment on Loïc Wacquant’s ‘Marginality, Ethnicity, and Penality’ begins by highlighting three of Wacquant’s most important interventions. It then extends the analysis by drawing on research about urban marginality in South Africa and Palestine/Israel. Whereas Wacquant focuses on the state response to urban marginality, I suggest that it is important to look beyond the state to consider how other actors have responded to the growth of precarious populations. Specifically, I point out that private security companies and residents’ associations are at the forefront of efforts to police poor black South Africans, while an imperial network of security forces polices the Palestinian precariat.

 

 

New Article: Leech, Who owns ‘the spring’ in Palestine?

Leech, Philip. “Who Owns ‘The Spring’ in Palestine? Rethinking Popular Consent and Resistance in the Context of the ‘Palestinian State’ and the ‘Arab Spring’.” Democratization, published online April 29, 2014.

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13510347.2014.899584

Abstract

The Palestinian Authority’s (PA) claim to embody the spirit of the “Arab Spring”, through its recent “state-building” agenda – including its elevation to “non-member observer status” at the United Nations – is disingenuous. This conclusion rests on three key arguments outlined in this article. First, this article identifies a continuation of broader patterns of authoritarianism represented by the PA’s lack of adherence to democratic practices, the deprivation of access for the Palestinian population to basic resources and the wider issue of the continued absence of Palestinian sovereignty. Second, it identifies the intensification of some authoritarian practices within Palestine, particularly in the areas of security and policing, for example by the use of force against protestors. Finally, this article identifies that civil-society groups and opposition supporters throughout 2011–2012 have more genuinely embodied evidence of resistance to authoritarianism in popular demonstrations against the PA.

Reviews: Frisch, Israel’s Security and Its Arab Citizens

Frisch, Hillel. Israel’s Security and Its Arab Citizens. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011.

cover

Reviews

  • Leslau, Ohad. “Review.” Contemporary Security Policy 33.3 (2012): 597-598.
  • Waterbury, John. “Review.” Foreign Affairs, March/April 2013.
  • Lustick, Ian S. “Review.” International Journal of Middle East Studies 45.3 (2013): 633-7.

ToC: Israel Affairs 19,2 (2013)

 
Israel Affairs, Vol. 19, No. 2, 01 Apr 2013 is now available on Taylor & Francis Online. This new issue contains the following articles:

Original Articles

Anti-Semitism and anti-Zionism in Iran

Rusi Jaspal Pages: 231-258 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.778085

 

In defence of the idea of a Jewish state

Mordechai Nisan Pages: 259-272 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.778088 : 273-289 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.778089

 

The status of Arabic in the discourse of Israeli policymakers

Dafna Yitzhaki Pages: 290-305 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.778091

 

Oversight by the State Control Committee in the Israeli parliament: form of accountability under stress

Chen Friedberg Pages: 306-320 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.778083

 

Israeli stamps 1948–2010: between nationalism and cosmopolitanism

Einat Lachover & Dalia Gavriely Nuri Pages: 321-337 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.778086

 

Advertising as a semiotic system of space: image of the desert in Israeli advertising, 1967–2004

Avivit Agam Dali Pages: 338-352 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.778082

 

The transformation of the Israeli Civil Guard into a police force

Yaffa Moskovich Pages: 353-363 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.778087

 

Between self-interest and international norms: legitimizing the PLO

Ogen S. Goldman Pages: 364-378 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.778084

 

 

Book Reviews

 

Sharon: the life of a leader David Rodman

Pages: 379-380 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.778092

 

A lasting reward: memoirs of an Israeli diplomat

David Rodman Pages: 380-381 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.778093

The horsemen of Israel: horses and chariotry in monarchic Israel (ninth-eighth centuries BCE)

David Rodman Pages: 381-382 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.778095

 

In the sands of the Sinai: a physician’s account of the Yom Kippur war

David Rodman Pages: 382-383 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.778096

 

Israel’s silent defender: an inside look at sixty years of Israeli intelligence

David Rodman Pages: 383-384 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.778097

 

Brothers at war: Israel and the tragedy of the Altalena

David Rodman Pages: 385-386 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.778098

 

Israel: an introduction

David Rodman Pages: 386-387 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.778099

 

Only Israel west of the river: the Jewish state and the Palestinian question

David Rodman Pages: 387-388 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.778100

 

Israel and the United States: six decades of US–Israeli relations

David Rodman Pages: 388-389 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.778101

 

Nine lives of Israel: a nation’s history through the lives of its foremost leaders

David Rodman Pages: 390-391 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.778102

 

Israel’s Palestinians

Raphael Cohen-Almagor Pages: 391-392 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.751734

Enjoy FREE ONLINE ACCESS to all Routledge articles published on the Arab Spring in the last year. Start reading now.

 

Cite: Ganor and Falk, De-Radicalization in Israel’s Prison System

Ganor, Boaz and Ophir Falk. “De-Radicalization in Israel’s Prison System.” Studies in Conflict & Terrorism 36.2 (2013): 116-31.

 

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/1057610X.2013.747071

 

Abstract

An effective de-radicalization process in prisons is intended to facilitate the renouncement of violence and terrorism by those that have carried out such offenses. A key lesson that can be drawn from Israel’s de-radicalization efforts is that it is possible, indeed recommended, to treat inmates—regardless of their level of radicalization—in a dignified and humane manner. However, Israel’s ability to significantly de-radicalize security prisoners is limited if it is at all existent in its current form. Security prisoners with the potential for positive change should be placed in a different, perhaps foreign setting. This article provides an overview of Israel’s prison system, the challenges it faces, its efforts to de-radicalize security inmates and suggests additional courses of action.

Cite: Hunter, U.S.-European Relations in the Mideast

Hunter, Robert E. “U.S.-European Relations in the “Greater“ Middle East.” American Foreign Policy Interests 34.3 (2012): 125-133.

 

URL: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/routledg/uafp/2012/00000034/00000003/art00002

 

Abstract

Despite the U.S. “pivot to Asia,“ it will remain deeply engaged in both Europe and the Middle East. But it must begin treating the latter region as a whole, not as a series of disparate parts; revisit its policies to Israel-Palestine negotiations and Iran; and lead in creating a viable security structure for the Persian Gulf. For their part, to ensure that U.S. Asian and Middle East interests do not lead America to radically decrease its security “footprint“ in Europe—especially in “managing“ Russia’s future, its North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) allies must accept the terms of a new “transatlantic bargain“: accepting added responsibilities in North Africa and the Middle East, at times beyond judgments of their national interests. They must also join the United States in developing a new Atlantic Compact, a new Persian Gulf security structure, and a much more cooperative relationship between NATO and the European Union.