New Article: Finzi-Dottan & Cohen, Predictors of Involvement and Warmth of Custodial Fathers in Israel

Finzi-Dottan, Ricky, and Orna Cohen. “Predictors of Involvement and Warmth of Custodial Fathers in Israel: Comparison with Married and Noncustodial Divorced Fathers.” Family Process (early view; online first).

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/famp.12124

 

Abstract

This study compared the levels and predictors of paternal warmth and involvement of 218 custodial fathers to 222 married fathers and 105 noncustodial (NC) divorced fathers in Israel. The examined predictors were fathers’ perceptions of their own fathers; their own caregiving behaviors and parental self-efficacy; and child characteristics and coparental coordination. Results indicated that being a custodial father was associated with more involvement than being a married or NC divorced father. Regression analyses revealed that experience of care with own father predicted fathers’ involvement, whereas own father control was related to lower paternal warmth. Lower avoidant caregiving and high paternal self-efficacy predicted both paternal involvement and warmth, whereas perceiving the child as more difficult predicted lower paternal warmth. Higher levels of coparental coordination were associated with more paternal involvement, whereas low coparental coordination was associated with less involvement, primarily among NC divorced fathers. These interactions highlight the distinct paternal behavior of custodial fathers. Unlike married and NC divorced fathers, they showed more warmth, regardless of their avoidant caregiving. Results are discussed in light of the different roles played by fathers in the three groups.

New Article: Moran et al, Why Do Mental Health Consumers Who Receive Rehabilitation Services, Are Not Using Them?

Moran, Galia S., Yael Baruch, Faissal Azaiza, and Max Lachman. “Why Do Mental Health Consumers Who Receive Rehabilitation Services, Are Not Using Them? A Qualitative Investigation of Users’ Perspectives in Israel.” Community Mental Health Journal (early view; online first).

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10597-015-9905-1

 

Abstract

A recovery-oriented approach to mental health involves creating person centered services and enhancing engagement in psychiatric rehabilitation. Israel’s Rehabilitation in the Community of Persons with Mental Disabilities Law is a progressive initiative that shifted the locus of psychiatric care to community care supporting individualized rehabilitation and recovery-oriented processes. Yet over a quarter of applicants do not implement their assigned rehabilitation plans and services. This qualitative study investigated reasons and experiences related to lack of utilization from applicants’ perspectives. Fifteen service users were interviewed face to face in semi-structured interviews analyzed using Grounded theory approach. Seven categories emerged: (1) Lack of knowledge and orientation; (2) Negative perceptions about rehabilitation services (3) Lack of active participation/shared decision-making; (4) Not feeling heard by the committee; (5) Lack of congruence between participants’ goals and committee’s final decisions; (6) Lack of escorting professionals’ competencies; and (7) Family members’ influence. The results are interpreted at the structural and human process levels. Suggestions are provided for augmenting systemic procedures and human interactions processes.

New Article: Tzivian et al, Death of Companion Dogs and Stress in Healthy Israeli Women

Tzivian, Lilian, Michael Friger, and Talma Kushnir. “The Death and Owning of the Companion Dog: Association between Resource Loss and Stress in Healthy Israeli Women.” Journal of Veterinary Behavior 10.3 (2015): 223-30.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jveb.2015.01.005

 

Abstract

Dog owners often regard their dogs as family members that provide companionship and feelings of security and of being loved. The loss of a dog may be experienced as a stressful life event and lead to bereavement. The aim of this study was to explore the contribution of a Conservation of Resources (COR) theory to the understanding of the effects pet dogs might have on their healthy adult owners’ stress. We performed a cross-sectional study of 110 current dog owners and 103 bereaved owners, all females. Veterinarians from 48 private clinics from central Israel referred the researchers to owners who euthanized their pet dogs in 1-month period. The control group included owners who had lived with the dogs for more than 2 years. Based on the COR theory, 2 new instruments to measure resource losses and gains of owners were assembled. The level of stress was assessed by the Perceived Stress and the Somatic Complaints scales. Stress was stronger for bereaved owners (statistically significant). In multivariate regression, for current owners, the factors correlated with stress were: number of cigarettes, performing or not performing sports activity in previous 2 weeks, and dog-related losses. For bereaved owners, the factors that correlated with stress were number of cigarettes and losses owing to a dog’s death. The findings of the study supported the hypothesis that stress among bereaved owners is higher than that among the current owners. It seems that the death of a dog is a stressful life event.

New Article: Yaffe & Burg, Problematic Internet Use and Academic Achievement among Teacher-Trainees in Israeli Colleges

Yaffe, Yosi, and David Burg. “Problematic Internet Use and Academic Achievement among Teacher-Trainees in Israeli Colleges.” International Journal of Research Studies in Psychology 4.1 (2015): 25-35.

 
URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.5861/ijrsp.2015.1020 [PDF]

 

Abstract
Digital technology has penetrated all aspects of modern culture, and it has been purported revolutionize education. However, a growing concern alludes to subtle adverse effects it may have on learning outcomes. The current work studied the association between problematic Internet use (PIU) and academic achievements among pre-service teacher trainee students (N=138) from two educational colleges in Israel. A significant interaction effect for PIU and gender was observed on students’ grades, while holding four demographic variables as covariate. These results indicate an underlying behavioral phenomenon with unique relevance in an educational context.

 

 

New Article: Nakash et al, Primary Mental Health Prevention Themes in Published Research and Academic Programs in Israel

Nakash, Ora, Liat Razon, and Itzhak Levav. “Primary Mental Health Prevention Themes in Published Research and Academic Programs in Israel.” Israel Journal of Health Policy Research (early view; online first).

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/2045-4015-4-3

 

Abstract
Background

The World Health Organization Comprehensive Mental Health Action Plan (CMHAP) 2013–2020 proposes the implementation of primary prevention strategies to reduce the mental health burden of disease. The extent to which Israeli academic programs and published research adhere to the principles spelled out by the CMHAP is unknown.

Objective

To investigate the presence of mental health primary prevention themes in published research and academic programs in Israel.

Methods

We searched for mental health primary prevention themes in: (1) three major journals of psychiatry and social sciences during the years 2001–2012; (2) university graduate programs in psychology, social work and medicine in leading universities for the academic year of 2011–2012; and (3) doctoral and master’s theses approved in psychology and social work departments in five universities between the years 2007–2012.

We used a liberal definition of primary prevention to guide the above identification of themes, including those related to theory, methods or research information of direct or indirect application in practice.

Results

Of the 934 articles published in the three journals, 7.2%, n = 67, addressed primary prevention. Of the 899 courses in the 19 graduate programs 5.2%, n = 47, elective courses addressed primary prevention. Of the 1960 approved doctoral and master’s theses 6.2%, n = 123, addressed primary prevention. Only 11 (4.7%) articles, 5 (0.6%) courses, and 5 (0.3%) doctoral and master’s theses addressed primary prevention directly.

Conclusions

The psychiatric reform currently implemented in Israel and WHO CMHAP call for novel policies and course of action in all levels of prevention, including primary prevention. Yet, the latter is rarely a component of mental health education and research activities. The baseline we drew could serve to evaluate future progress in the field.
.

 

New Article: Barak and Leichtentritt, Ideological Meaning Making After the Loss of a Child

Barak, Adi and Ronit D. Leichtentritt. “Ideological Meaning Making After the Loss of a Child: The Case of Israeli Bereaved Parents.” Death Studies 39.6 (2015): 360-368.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07481187.2014.958626

 

Abstract

The study provides a view of ideological meaning-making processes of 10 Israelis who lost a child examining the parents’ perspectives and written public documents. The texts and interviews were analyzed using Gadamer’s hermeneutic philosophy. Findings indicate that bereaved parents construct conflicting ideologically oriented viewpoints: doubting and affirming the Zionist ideology; ascribing sense and senselessness to the loss; and joining the ethos but keeping personal meanings. Our conclusion is consistent with theorists who reject the notion that the human narrative should be coherently unified. We point to potential links between relational dialectics and meaning-making theory and outline implications for practice.

New Article: Possick, Grandparents’ Meaning Construction of the Loss of a Grandchild in a Terror Attack

Possick, Chaya. “Grandparents’ Meaning Construction of the Loss of a Grandchild in a Terror Attack in Israel.” Journal of Loss and Trauma 20.3 (2015): 214-28.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15325024.2013.852028

 

Abstract

This qualitative research study is based on in-depth interviews with 12 grandparents who had a grandchild killed in a terror attack in Israel. Two main categories that emerged from the data analysis were (a) loss in the personal context and (b) loss in the collective context. Each category was subdivided into two groups: first, grandparents whose grief centered on specific aspects of the painful loss of an intimate connection with the grandchild and grandparents who were directly exposed to the terror attack and whose narrative focused on the traumatic memory, and, second, grandparents who constructed their loss as part of the history of anti-Semitism and grandparents who constructed their loss as part of the Israeli narrative of the struggle for the land and the state of Israel. The article demonstrates how each type highlights a different aspect of grandparental bereavement as a result of a terror attack. Clinical implications of the findings are presented.

New Article: Dan et al, Differences in State Anxiety Responses to Combat Pictures between Young Adult Israeli Jews and Israeli Palestinian Arabs

Dan, Orrie,  Yona Moshe David, Michal Abraham, and Dorit Hadar Souval. “Differences in State Anxiety Responses to Combat Pictures between Young Adult Israeli Jews and Israeli Palestinian Arabs.” Psychology 6 (2015): 1136-43.

 

URL: http://www.scirp.org/Journal/PaperInformation.aspx?paperID=58194
http://dx.doi.org/10.4236/psych.2015.69111 (PDF)

 

Abstract

The purpose of the current study was to investigate whether the different political realities of Israeli Jewish citizens and of Israeli Palestinian Arab citizens had differential impacts on the situational anxiety elicited by video clips of military operations. The pictures were taken during the November 2012 Pillar of Defense military operation in Gaza and southern Israel. Participants included 75 (49 female) students at an Israeli college. Of these, 39 were Israeli Jews and 36 were Israeli Arabs. Participants completed the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (Spielberger, 1983) and then watched a video clip containing combat pictures. After that they completed the State Anxiety Inventory again. The results showed no differences between Israeli Jewish participants and Israeli Palestinian Arab participants on trait anxiety. Analysis revealed a significant group (Israeli Jews/ Israeli Palestinian Arabs) X condition (before/after watching the video clip pictures) interaction effect. Before watching the video clip, the groups exhibited no difference in state anxiety. After watching the clip, the Israeli Palestinian Arab participants showed greater state anxiety compared with the Israeli Jews.

New Article: Lahad and Shoshana, Singlehood in Treatment

Lahad, Kinneret, and Avi Shoshana. “Singlehood in Treatment: Interrogating the Discursive Alliance between Postfeminism and Therapeutic Culture.” European Journal of Women’s Studies 22.3 (2015): 334-49.

 
 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/

 

Abstract

This article offers a critical discourse analysis of the Israeli television series In Treatment. The series unfolds the therapy sessions of a 40-year-old single female attorney with her therapist. The main objective of the study was to identify the scripted tactics or narrative strategies that establish and maintain singlehood. The findings indicate that the therapeutic discourse plays a central role in the construction and interpretation of single women’s subjectivities, prompting a narrative that encourages the ‘discarding’ of singlehood as well as therapeutic work slanted towards a more familial and maternally oriented subjectivity. This narrative unfolds through two dominant scripted tactics: the symbolic annihilation of singlehood and the construction of feminine identity hierarchies (what the authors term ‘hierarchies of happy endings’). Moreover, it is also prompted by the discursive alliance between the therapeutic discourse and the postfeminist discourse. Consequently, long-term singlehood is portrayed as an unnatural and pathological life script characterized by its lack and deficiency. Furthermore, as opposed to childless singlehood, single motherhood by choice emerges as a preferred and desirable life option. The category of single motherhood is endowed with new forms of legitimacy, reinforcing new-old patriarchal and postfeminist conceptions of women’s reproductive potential and what is considered to be women’s primary life purpose.

 
 
 

New Article: Kulik, Employment Hardiness among Women in Israel’s Ultraorthodox Community

Kulik, Liat. “Explaining Employment Hardiness Among Women in Israel’s Ultraorthodox Community. Facilitators and Inhibitors.” Journal of Career Assessment (early view; online first).

 
 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1069072714565104

 

Abstract

Based on a sample of 319 Israeli women belonging to the ultraorthodox Jewish community, this study examined factors that facilitate and inhibit the development of employment hardiness. The term employment hardiness refers to one aspect of me as a worker and reflects a self-perception characterized by three distinguishing components, that is, openness to change at work, employment self-efficacy, and work commitment. Facilitators of employment hardiness were manifested in the women’s personal and environmental resources as well as in their work-promoting attitudes (egalitarian gender-role ideology and work centrality). Conversely, the inhibitors were manifested in the participants’ experience of daily stress. Openness to change at work and employment self-efficacy were explained primarily by workplace support and by personal resources as reflected in psychological and community empowerment, whereas work commitment was explained primarily by work-promoting attitudes as well as by the experience of daily stress. Practical recommendations are presented for organizations employing ultraorthodox women as well as for employment counselors, which aim to enhance employment hardiness among traditional women in communities undergoing modernization.

 
 
 

New Article: Hirsch et al, Home Attachment and Coherence in Times of War: Perspectives of Jewish Israeli Mothers

Hirsch, Tal Litvak, Orna Braun-Lewensohn, and Alon Lazar. “Does Home Attachment Contribute to Strengthen Sense of Coherence in Times of War? Perspectives of Jewish Israeli Mothers.” Women & Health 55.4 (2015): 467-83.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03630242.2015.1022688

 

Abtract

The perceptions of home, the significance attached to the home, and the reasons for the decision to continue living at home despite past and potentially future threats were investigated among Jewish Israeli mothers whose homes were exposed to long-term rocket attacks. Findings showed that the mothers expressed a firm attachment to their homes and to their physical and social surroundings and indicated that home attachment, in terms of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors connected to home, contributed to the strengthening of their sense of coherence due to the comprehension, management, and the meaning that they accorded the situation. These components of sense of coherence served as assets and coping resources that helped the women handle their stressful situations.

New Article: Stolovy et al, Quality of Life Among Israeli Women Who Practice Channeling Compared to Women with Similar Traumatic History

Stolovy, Tali, Rachel Lev-Wiesel, and Eliezer Witztum. “Dissociation: Adjustment or Distress? Dissociative Phenomena, Absorption and Quality of Life Among Israeli Women Who Practice Channeling Compared to Women with Similar Traumatic History.” Journal of Religion and Health 54.3 (2015): 1040-51.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10943-014-9885-4

 

Abstract

This study aimed to explore the relationship between traumatic history, dissociative phenomena, absorption and quality of life among a population of channelers, in comparison with a population of non-channelers with similar traumatic history. The study sample included 150 women. The measures included Traumatic Experiences Scale, Dissociative Experience Scale, Absorption Scale, Brief Symptom Inventory and Quality of Life (QOL) Assessment. Channelers presented significantly higher levels of dissociation, absorption and psychological health compared to the other group. Dissociation and absorption were trauma-related only among the comparison group. Hence, dissociation has different qualities among different people, and spiritual practice contributes to QOL.

New Article: Stolovy et al, Experience of Israeli Women Who Practice Channeling

Stolovy, Tali, Rachel Lev-Wiesel, and Zvi Eisikovits. “Dissociation and the Experience of Channeling: Narratives of Israeli Women Who Practice Channeling.” International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis 63.3 (2015): 346-64.

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00207144.2015.1031555

Abstract
“Channeling” is a phenomenon in which people describe themselves as receiving messages from another personality or dimension of reality. Channeling is often regarded as dissociation, which is a disruption in the usually integrated functions of consciousness, memory, identity, or perception. This study explored the interface between channeling and dissociation through a phenomenological analysis. Qualitative data were obtained through interviews with 20 Israeli women who practice channeling. The analysis revealed 3 themes: dissociation, absorption, and control. The channelers’ descriptions correspond with what is coined as “dissociative states” and enable an emic view of the etic definition of dissociation.

New Article: Abu-Raiya et al, Religious Coping and Social Support for Israeli Muslim Parents of Children with Cancer

Abu-Raiya, Hisham, Liat Hamama, and Fatima Fokra. “Contribution of Religious Coping and Social Support to the Subjective Well-Being of Israeli Muslim Parents of Children with Cancer: A Preliminary Study.” Health & Social Work (early view; online first).

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/hsw/hlv031

 

Abstract

No single study has examined the subjective well-being (SWB) among Israeli Muslim parents of children treated for cancer. To fill this gap in the literature, this preliminary study espouses a positive psychology orientation and examines the contribution of social support and religious coping to the SWB among this population. The study’s sample consisted of 70 Israeli Muslim parents of children who were receiving active treatment for their cancer. Participants were asked to provide demographic information on themselves and their ill child and to complete measures of SWB (that is, positive affect, negative affect, satisfaction with life), social support, and religious coping (that is, positive religious coping, punishing God reappraisal). The authors found that higher scores on social support were correlated with higher scores on satisfaction with life and lower scores on negative affect. Higher scores on positive religious coping were correlated with higher scores on satisfaction with life. Punishing God reappraisal did not correlate with any of the SWB indices. Social support emerged as a partial mediator between positive religious coping and satisfaction with life. Social support and some methods of religious coping seem to enhance the SWB of Israeli Muslim parents of children treated for cancer.

New Article: Israel-Cohen et al, Gratitude and PTSD Symptoms among Israeli Youth Exposed to Missile Attacks

Israel-Cohen, Yael, Florina Uzefovsky, Gabriela Kashy-Rosenbaum, and Oren Kaplan. “Gratitude and PTSD Symptoms among Israeli Youth Exposed to Missile Attacks: Examining the Mediation of Positive and Negative Affect and Life Satisfaction.” Journal of Positive Psychology 10.2 (2015): 99-106.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17439760.2014.927910

 

Abstract

Based on a sample of Israeli adolescents living in a city which was under missile attack 2½ months prior to this study, we examined the possible affective and cognitive mechanisms through which gratitude may serve as a protective factor against PTSD symptoms. Specifically, we focused on how this process might be mediated by positive affect, negative affect, and life satisfaction. These are widely understood as the emotional and cognitive components of subjective well-being and have each been significantly associated with gratitude and with pathology in the literature. Using pathway analysis, our findings revealed that life satisfaction and negative affect, but not positive affect, mediated the relationship between gratitude and PTSD symptoms. Our study suggests that gratitude may serve as a protective factor primarily through cognitive appraisal processes tied to greater appreciation of life in a way that distinguishes it from other positive emotions.

 

New Article: Mansbach-Kleinfeld et al, Child Sexual Abuse as Reported by Israeli Adolescents

Mansbach-Kleinfeld, Ivonne, Anneke Ifrah, Alan Apter, and Ilana Farbstein. “Child Sexual Abuse as Reported by Israeli Adolescents: Social and Health Related Correlates.” Child Abuse & Neglect 40 (2015): 68-80.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chiabu.2014.11.014

 

Abstract

The objectives of the study were to assess the prevalence of child sexual abuse (CSA) in a nation-wide representative sample of 14–17 year old Israeli adolescents, and to examine the associations between CSA, socio-demographic correlates and various measures of physical and mental health. The study population consisted of 906 mother–adolescent dyads, belonging to a community based, representative sample of Israeli 14–17 year olds, interviewed in 2004–5. Response rate was 68%. Subjects provided demographic data, and information about CSA, physical symptoms, body image, well-being and use of mental health services. DAWBA was used to obtain information regarding mental disorders and suicidality. SDQ was used to obtain data on bullying. Statistical analyses were conducted using an SPSS-17 complex sample analysis module and multivariate analyses were conducted to assess the associations between CSA and risk factors and social and health related correlates. Findings show that CSA was reported by 3.3% of adolescents. Higher risk of exposure to CSA was found among girls, among adolescents living in a one-parent household and among adolescents with a chronic disability. In multivariate models adjusting for gender, learning disabilities and depression, CSA was associated with suicidal attempts, stomach ache, dizziness, sleep problems, well being at home and bullying behaviors. No association was found with suicidal ideation or other physical symptoms. Our findings confirm that the associations between CSA and different outcomes vary depending on the socio-psychological context, and underline the importance of addressing the complexity of variables associated with CSA.

New Article: Ayalon et al, Informal Mental Health Help-Seeking Attitudes according to Israeli Arab Women

Ayalon, Liat, Khaled Karkabi, Igor Bleichman, Silvia Fleischmann, and Margalit Goldfracht. “Between Modern and Traditional Values: Informal Mental Health Help-Seeking Attitudes according to Israeli Arab Women, Primary Care Patients and Their Providers.” International Journal of Social Psychiatry 61.4 (2015): 386-93.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0020764014549082

 

Abstract

Background: Israeli Arab women under-utilize mental health services.

Objectives: The present study evaluated the use of alternative services for dealing with depression and anxiety among Israeli Arab women and primary care providers.

Material: Four focus groups with primary care patients and two focus groups with primary care providers were conducted. Constant comparisons were employed in order to identify major themes related to informal help-seeking behaviors.

Discussion: Three informal help-seeking behaviors were identified: (a) social support, divided into extended family and neighbors versus nuclear family and close friends; (b) religiosity, divided into inner, direct practices and beliefs versus externally mediated ones; and (c) self-help techniques, such as engagement in activities and distancing oneself from the situation. Both social support and religiosity were viewed with ambivalence by primary care patients and providers.

Conclusion: The findings suggest that the Arab population in Israel might be lacking informal sources of support at times of mental health needs.

New Article: Gil et al, Risk Factors for DSM 5 PTSD Symptoms in Israeli Civilians

Gil, Sharon, Michael Weinberg, Keren Or-Chen, and Hila Harel. “Risk Factors for DSM 5 PTSD Symptoms in Israeli Civilians during the Gaza War.” Brain and Behavior 5.4 (2015).

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/brb3.316

 

Abstract

Background

In light of the current modifications presented in the diagnostic criteria of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the DSM 5, this study aimed at revalidating well-known PTSD risk factors, including gender, peritraumatic dissociation, social support, level of threat, and trait tendency for forgiveness.

Method

Five hundred and one Israeli civilians were assessed during real-time exposure to missile and rocket fire at the eruption of the Gaza war. Assessments took place approximately one to 2 weeks after the beginning of this military operation, relying on web administration of the study, which allowed simultaneous data collection from respondents in the three regions in Israel that were under attack.

Results

A structural equation model design revealed that higher levels of forgiveness toward situations were associated with fewer PTSD symptoms, whereas peritraumatic dissociation and high levels of objective and subjective threat were positively associated with PTSD symptoms. Additionally, females were at higher risk for PTSD symptoms than males.

Conclusions

The findings of this study provide further evidence for the importance of directing preventive attention to those vulnerable to the development of elevated levels of PTSD symptoms. Theoretical and clinical implications of the findings are discussed.

New Book: Safir et al., Future Directions in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Safir, Marilyn P., Helene S. Wallach, and Albert Rizzo, eds. Future Directions in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: Prevention, Diagnosis, and Treatment. New York: Springer, 2015.

 

springer_

 

Ours is an era of increasing tension, both global and local. And not surprisingly, PTSD is recognized not only in combat veterans and active military personnel, but also disaster and assault survivors across the demographic spectrum. As current events from mass shootings to the debate over trigger warnings keep the issue in the public eye, the disorder remains a steady concern among researchers and practitioners.

Future Directions in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder presents findings and ideas with the potential to influence both our conceptualization of the condition and the techniques used to address it. A multidisciplinary panel of experts offers new analyses of risk and resilience factors, individual and group approaches to prevention, the evolving process of diagnosis, and effective treatment and delivery. Chapters on treatment allow readers to compare widely-used prolonged exposure and VR methods with innovative applications of cognitive processing therapy and interpersonal therapy. And an especially compelling contribution surveys empirically-based programs relating to what for many is the emblematic trauma of our time, the events of September 11, 2001. Included in the coverage:

  • Predictors of vulnerability to PTSD: neurobiological and genetic risk factors.
  • Early intervention: is prevention better than cure?
  • The functional neuroanatomy of PTSD.
  • The development of evidence-based treatment for PTSD.
  • Enhancing exposure therapy using D-Cycloserine (DCS).
  • PLUS: a case example as seen through five therapeutic perspectives.

While millions experience trauma, relatively few develop chronic PTSD. Future Directions in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder is a practical and proactive reference for the health and clinical psychologists, sociologists, psychiatrists, and primary care physicians dedicated to further decreasing those numbers.

 

Table of contents

  • Vulnerability to PTSD: Psychosocial and Demographic Risk and Resilience Factors

    Bar-Shai, Marina (et al.)

    Pages 3-30

  • Neurobiological Risk Factors and Predictors of Vulnerability and Resilience to PTSD

    Bar-Shai, Marina (et al.)

    Pages 31-63

  • The Early Adolescent or “Juvenile Stress” Translational Animal Model of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    Richter-Levin, Gal (et al.)

    Pages 65-77

  • An Attachment Perspective on Traumatic and Posttraumatic Reactions

    Mikulincer, Mario (et al.)

    Pages 79-96 

  • Delayed-Onset PTSD in Israeli Combat Veterans: Correlates, Clinical Picture, and Controversy

    Horesh, Danny (et al.)

    Cutting Edge Research on Prevention of PTSD

    Kearns, Megan C. (et al.)

    Pages 133-153

  • Systems of Care for Traumatized Children: The Example of a School-Based Intervention Model

    Brom, Danny (et al.)

    Pages 155-169

  • Is Prevention Better than Cure? How Early Interventions Can Prevent PTSD

    Freedman, Sara A. (et al.)

    Pages 171-186

  • Evolution of PTSD Diagnosis in the

    Echterling, Lennis G. (et al.)

    Pages 189-212

  • Functional Neuroanatomy of PTSD: Developmental Cytoarchitectonic Trends, Memory Systems, and Control Processes

    Gilboa, Asaf

    Pages 213-241

  • Prolonged Exposure Treatment

    Nacasch, Nitsa (et al.)

    Pages 245-251

  • Cognitive Processing Therapy: Beyond the Basics

    Chard, Kathleen M. (et al.)

    Pages 253-262

  • Interpersonal Psychotherapy for PTSD

    Rafaeli, Alexandra Klein (et al.)

    Pages 263-272

  • Inclusion of Virtual Reality: A Rationale for the Use of VR in the Treatment of PTSD

    García-Palacios, Azucena (et al.)

    Pages 275-287


  • Initial Development and Dissemination of Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy for Combat-Related PTSD

    Reger, Greg M. (et al.)

    Pages 289-302

  • Update and Expansion of the Virtual Iraq/Afghanistan PTSD Exposure Therapy System

    Rizzo, Albert (et al.)

    Pages 303-328

  • Mental Health Problems and Treatment Utilization of Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans Enrolled in Department of Veterans Affairs Health Care

    Seal, Karen H. (et al.)

    Pages 329-345

  • Enhancing Exposure Therapy for PTSD Using

    Burton, Mark S. (et al.)

    Pages 347-365

  • Implementation of Evidence-Based Assessment, Treatment, and Research Programs Following the World Trade Center Disaster on September 11, 2001

    Olden, Megan (et al.)

    Pages 367-387

  • Case Presentation of a Chronic Combat PTSD Veteran

    Nacasch, Nitsa (et al.)

    Pages 391-409

  • Matching Treatment to Patients Suffering from PTSD: What We Know and Especially What We Don’t Know

    Wallach, Helene S.

    Pages 411-415

  • Erratum to: Case Presentation of a Chronic Combat PTSD Veteran

 

New Article: Iancu et al, Social Anxiety Symptoms and Perfectionism among Israeli Jews and Arabs

Iancu, I., E. Bodner, S. Joubran, I. Ben Zion, and E. Ram. “Why Not the Best? Social Anxiety Symptoms and Perfectionism among Israeli Jews and Arabs: A Comparative Study.” Comprehensive Psychiatry  59 (2015): 33-44.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.comppsych.2014.11.010

 

Abstract

Background

Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) has been repeatedly shown to be very prevalent in the Western society and is characterized by low self-esteem, pessimism, procrastination and also perfectionism. Very few studies on SAD have been done in the Middle East or in Arab countries, and no study tackled the relationship between social anxiety symptoms and perfectionism in non-Western samples.

Methods

We examined social anxiety symptoms and perfectionism in a group of 132 Israeli Jewish (IJ) and Israeli Arab (IA) students. Subjects completed the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS), the Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale (MPS), the Negative Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire (ATQ-N), the Positive Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire (ATQ-P) and a socio-demographic questionnaire.

Results

The rate of SAD in our sample according to a LSAS score of 60 or more was 17.2% (IJ = 13.8%, IA = 19%, ns). The correlation between perfectionism and the LSAS was high in both groups, and in particular in the IJ group. The IA group had higher scores of social avoidance, of ATQ-P and of two of the MPS subscales: parental expectations and parental criticism. Concern over mistakes and negative automatic thoughts positively predicted social fear in the IJ group, whereas in the IA group being female, religious and less educated positively predicted social fear. Negative automatic thoughts and age positively predicted social avoidance in the IJ group. In general, the IJ and IA subjects showed higher social anxiety, higher ATQ-N scores and lower parental expectations as compared with non-clinical US samples.

Conclusions

Social anxiety symptoms and perfectionism are prevalent in Arab and Jewish students in Israel and seem to be closely related. Further studies among non-western minority groups may detect cultural influences on social anxiety and might add to the growing body of knowledge on this intriguing condition.