Cite: Golan and Orr, Israeli NGOs Defending Palestinian Rights

Golan, Daphna and Zvika Orr. “Translating Human Rights of the ‘Enemy’: The Case of Israeli NGOs Defending Palestinian Rights.” Law & Society Review 46.4 (2012): 781-814.

 

URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1540-5893.2012.00517.x/abstract

 

Abstract

This article explores the practices, discourses and dilemmas of the Israeli human rights NGOs that are working to protect and promote the human rights of Palestinians in the Occupied Territories. This case can shed light on the complex process of “triangular translation” of human rights, which is distinct from other forms of human rights localization studied thus far. In this process, human rights NGOs translate international human rights norms on the one hand, and the suffering of the victims on the other, into the conceptions and legal language commonly employed by the state that violates these rights. We analyze the dialectics of change and reproduction embedded in the efforts of Israeli activists to defend Palestinian human rights while at the same time depoliticizing their work and adopting discriminatory premises and conceptions hegemonic in Israeli society. The recent and alarming legislative proposals in Israel aimed at curtailing the work of human rights NGOs reinforce the need to reconsider the role of human rights NGOs in society, including their depoliticized strategies, their use of legal language and their relations with the diminishing peace movement.

Cite: Hatuka, Transformative Terrains: Counter Hegemonic Tactics of Dissent in Israel

Hatuka, Tali. “Transformative Terrains: Counter Hegemonic Tactics of Dissent in Israel.” Geopolitics – ahead of print.

URL:  http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14650045.2012.659298

Abstract

What makes citizens choose a particular mode of protest? This paper discusses the role of space in recent protests by three Israeli groups, Machsom Watch, Anarchists Against the Wall, and Women in Black, in Israel/Palestine. It looks at the way groups protest state violence (i.e., the occupation of the West Bank and Gaza and the construction of the separation wall) by initiating counter hegemonic strategies and tactics, and by creating new terrains of opposition. More specifically, I elaborate on their model of action and its function within a range of spheres (physical, geographical and virtual), supported by four key principles (difference, decentralisation, multiplicity and informal order). I argue that unlike more conventional protest rituals, often led by the dominant political parties, contemporary dissent takes place in parallel spheres constructing what I call transformative terrain – a social platform that challenges bounded politics by using imagination and space in creating new possibilities.

Cite: The Theatrical Ammunition of the 1967 War

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Yerushalmi, Dorit. "The Theatrical Ammunition of the 1967 War." Journal of Israeli History 28,2 (2009): 195-212.

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This article discusses the effects of the Six Day War on plays performed in the 1967/68 and 1968/69 theater seasons, in an attempt to demonstrate the great variety of the plays produced and their direct and indirect links to the cultural narrative. Israeli theater exploited the cultural ammunition furnished by the war, thereby demonstrating its own relevance and active participation in the battle waged by the state. At the same time, however, it exposed its limitations as a critical medium: whether the shows reacted to the war explicitly or implicitly, most of them avoided the issues of the occupation, bereavement, and loss.

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Keywords: Israeli theater; Six Day War; Casablan; Ha-Gashash ha-Hiver; Hanoch Levin; musicals; satirical cabaret; political theater, דורית ירושלמי

URL: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=all~content=a915192736