Bulletin: Peacemaking, Peace Building and the Israeli-Palestinian Peace Process

Books

Articles

Reviews

Theses

Book Chapter: Diab, al-Sādāt’s Knesset Address, Ṣulḥ, and Diplomacy

Diab, Rasha. “From the Egyptian People’s Assembly to the Israeli Knesset: al-Sādāt’s Knesset Address, Ṣulḥ, and Diplomacy.” In Shades of Ṣulḥ. The Rhetorics of Arab-Islamic Reconciliation (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2016): 112-60.

 

Shades of Sulh

Extract

In late November 1977, Muḥammad Anwar al-Sādāt undertook a risky and highly visible trip across the Egyptian-Israeli border to visit with the Knesset . The epigraph above comes from his Knesset address (hereafter KA) and sums up its overall goal, which sought to enable deliberation commensurate with the gravity of a series of wars and to attain peace. al-Sādāt’s KA interrupted and transformed a prolonged diplomatic stalemate, resuscitated peace talks, and eventually led to the Camp David Treaty. The KA and texts it deliberates with and against are the focal point of this chapter.

This chapter offers a bidimensional reading of ṣulḥ discourse, underlining how al-Sādāt’s diplomatic deliberations resuscitated Egyptian-Israeli peace talks in 1977 by drawing on a long tradition of public, formal ṣulḥ in addition to the three main features of ṣulḥ, namely initiating peace through commitment; mobilizing witnesses; and creating a community, political structure included, of peace pursuers. As such, this chapter provides yet another case where the three main features of ṣulḥ are conspicuous. I contend that these features of ṣulḥ are crucial to understanding al-Sādāt’s 1977 peace initiative and that they are the backbone of the address. However, ṣulḥ continues to be invisible in scholarship on al-Sādāt’s initiative. It is important to note that in this case ṣulḥ expresses itself in relation to other discourses that also seek to create transformative encounters, namely diplomatic discourse, border crossing, war/peace epideictic rhetoric, and policy articulations at moments of crises. In this mix, ṣulḥ can be forgotten unless we deliberately tease out its manifestation in both the symbolic and procedural dimensions of peacemaking.

 

 

New Book: Randall, Sufism and Jewish-Muslim Relations

Randall, Yafiah Katherine. Sufism and Jewish-Muslim Relations. The Derekh Avraham Order in Israel. New York: Routledge, 2016.

 

9781138914032

 

In Israel there are Jews and Muslims who practice Sufism together. The Sufi’ activities that they take part in together create pathways of engagement between two faith traditions in a geographical area beset by conflict.

Sufism and Jewish Muslim Relationsinvestigates this practice of Sufism among Jews and Muslims in Israel and examines their potential to contribute to peace in the area. It is an original approach to the study of reconciliation, situating the activities of groups that are not explicitly acting for peace within the wider context of grass-roots peace initiatives. The author conducted in-depth interviews with those practicing Sufism in Israel, and these are both collected in an appendix and used throughout the work to analyse the approaches of individuals to Sufism and the challenges they face. It finds that participants understand encounters between Muslim and Jewish mystics in the medieval Middle East as a common heritage to Jews and Muslims practising Sufism together today, and it explores how those of different faiths see no dissonance in the adoption of Sufi practices to pursue a path of spiritual progression.

The first examination of the Derekh Avraham Jewish-Sufi Order, this is a valuable resource for students and scholars of Sufi studies, as well as those interested in Jewish-Muslim relations.

 

Table of Contents

    • Part 1: Procedure and Contexts of the Research
    • 1 Introduction
    • 2 Contexts of the Investigation
    • 3 Historical Encounters of Jewish and Islamic Mysticism: precedents of Contemporary Practice in Israel
    • Part 2: Reading the Field Narratives
    • 4 The Derekh Avraham/Tariqat Ibrahimiyya and its Contemporary Re-emergence in Israel
    • 5 Beshara: Lovers of Ibn Arabi
    • 6 Embracing the Sufi Path and the Dissemination of Knowledge
    • 7 Jewish and Muslim Peacemakers
    • Part 3: Conclusion
    • 8 The Other Voice
    • Appendices

 

YAFIAH KATHERINE RANDALL received her PhD at the University of Winchester. She combines academic research into Jewish-Muslim relations focusing on Sufism with grass-roots action for interreligious understanding and conflict transformation.

New Article: Gavriely-Nuri, The Outbreak of Peace in Israeli Children’s Periodicals, 1977–79

Gavriely-Nuri, Dalia. “The Outbreak of Peace in Israeli Children’s Periodicals, 1977–1979.” Journal of Multicultural Discourses (early view; online first).

 
URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17447143.2016.1153643

 
Abstract

This study focuses on two exceptional moments in the Egyptian–Israeli history of conflict: the visit of President Anwar Sadat to Jerusalem in November 1977 and the signing of the Israeli–Egyptian peace treaty in March 1979. Combining peace studies, cultural studies and discourse analysis, the article analyzes the response of Israeli most popular children’s periodicals to these dramatic peace events in real time, during the months in which they occurred. The article’s contribution to peace research lies in its ability to shed light on how intergenerational discourse conveys peace legacy, a relatively neglected arena in peace research. In doing so, it likewise focuses on the discursive ‘failures’ embedded in the Israeli peace discourse.

 

 

 

New Article: Kabiri, Systemic Cultures in the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

Kabiri, Ariel. “Hobbes, Locke, and Kant: Systemic Cultures in the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict and Prospects for Peace.” In Regional Peacemaking and Conflict Management: A Comparative Approach (ed. Carmela Lutmar and Benjamin Miller; Abingdon and New York: Routledge, 2016): 158ff.

 
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Extract

Unlike in the case of Europe’s pacification, a transition period between enmity and friendship – the systemic culture of rivalry – never occurred, nor was even proposed with respect to Israeli-Palestinian social relations. Its omission can explain why the peace process failed; furthermore, by incorporating it, a real option for lasting peace might be revealed. I propose that a culture of rivalry can and will be imposed if a viable Palestinian state is established and that over time, relations of rivalry would approach internationalization at the level of legitimacy in Israeli and Palestinian societies. Rivalry generates a more moderate social reality than the one among enemies, though less peaceful than the one among friends.

 

 

 

New Article: Benziman, Ingredients of a Successful Track Two Negotiation

Benziman, Yuval. “Ingredients of a Successful Track Two Negotiation.” Negotiation Journal 32.1 (2016): 49-62.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/nejo.12146

 

Abstract

During three days in 2003, an Israeli–Palestinian group met in London to negotiate the draft of the “Geneva Initiative,” which offered a potential final status agreement between Israel and Palestine. In this article, I analyze the video recording of these unofficial negotiations and examine how the framing and conduct of the talks enabled significant progress toward reaching an agreement.

I describe six main framing techniques used by the mediators: calling the meetings an “exercise,” which reduced restraints on the participants and enhanced their flexibility, avoiding deep historical issues to focus solely on future-oriented pragmatic solutions, allowing the participants to discuss any topic they chose while deliberately avoiding crucial narrative issues, convincing the participants that this track two negotiation was crucial for the future of official Israeli–Palestinian relations, accentuating the parties’ understandings and agreements with each other, and building a sense of superordinate group identity among the participants, to encourage cooperation.

 

 

 

New Article: Nasie et al, Young Children in Intractable Conflicts

Nasie, Meytal, Aurel Harrison Diamond, and Daniel Bar-Tal. “Young Children in Intractable Conflicts: The Israeli Case.” Personality and Social Psychology Review (early view; online first).

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1088868315607800

 

Abstract

The article examines the political socialization of young Jewish-Israeli children who live under the Israeli–Palestinian intractable conflict. It proposes arguments and presents empirical evidence to suggest that the way in which political socialization of young children happens in this context contributes to the development of conflict-supporting narratives of ethos of conflict and collective memory by the youngest generation. As a result, the conflict solidifies adherence to these narratives in adulthood, thereby serving as a major obstacle to the processes of peace-making and peace-building. Specifically, as evidence for showing how the political socialization works in Israel, a series of studies conducted in Israeli kindergartens and elementary schools are presented. These studies recount the contents acquired by young children, as well as contents delivered by teachers, related to the Israeli–Palestinian conflict. This indicates the serious consequences of acquiring conflict-supporting narratives at an early age in societies involved in intractable conflict.

 

 

ToC: Mediterranean Politics, Forum on Prospects for Palestinian‒Israeli Relations

Forum Introduction: Prospects for Palestinian‒Israeli Relations: What Lies Ahead

Alaa Tartir & Bruno Oliveira Martins

 

Original Articles

Alaa Tartir

ToC: Journal of Palestine Studies 44.4 (2015)

 
University of California Press
Table of Contents Alert
University of California Press is happy to notify you that the new issue of Journal of Palestine Studies is now available. The online issues of this journal are hosted on JSTOR on behalf of University of California Press.
Journal Cover Journal of Palestine Studies
Vol. 44, No. 4, Summer 2015

Cover
Journal of Palestine Studies Summer 2015, Vol. 44, No. 4

Front Matter
Journal of Palestine Studies Summer 2015, Vol. 44, No. 4

Table of Contents
Journal of Palestine Studies Summer 2015, Vol. 44, No. 4

FROM THE EDITOR
Rashid I. Khalidi
Journal of Palestine Studies Summer 2015, Vol. 44, No. 4: 5-6.

ARTICLE

The Two-State Model and Israeli Constitutionalism: Impact on the Palestinian Citizens of Israel
Mazen Masri
Journal of Palestine Studies Summer 2015, Vol. 44, No. 4: 7-20.

INTERVIEW

Elia Suleiman: The Power of Ridicule
Nehad Khader
Journal of Palestine Studies Summer 2015, Vol. 44, No. 4: 21-31.

ESSAYS

Dream-Work of Dispossession: The Instance of Elia Suleiman
Stathis Gourgouris
Journal of Palestine Studies Summer 2015, Vol. 44, No. 4: 32-47.

The Way Forward: Full Citizenship for Israel’s Palestinian Minority
Avraham Burg
Journal of Palestine Studies Summer 2015, Vol. 44, No. 4: 48-56.

REMEMBRANCE

Eric Rouleau: Journalist Extraordinaire, Champion of the Palestinian Cause
Linda Butler
Journal of Palestine Studies Summer 2015, Vol. 44, No. 4: 57-67.

SPECIAL DOCUMENT FILE

The Iran Nuclear Negotiations: Israel and the U.S. Congress
Journal of Palestine Studies Summer 2015, Vol. 44, No. 4: 68-92.

RECENT BOOKS

Review: From Palestine to Israel: A Photographic Record of Destruction and State Formation, 1947–1950
From Palestine to Israel: A Photographic Record of Destruction and State Formation, 1947–1950 by Ariella Azoulay
Review by: Issam Nassar
Journal of Palestine Studies Summer 2015, Vol. 44, No. 4: 93-95.

Review: Colonial Jerusalem: The Spatial Construction of Identity and Difference in a City of Myth, 1948–2012
Colonial Jerusalem: The Spatial Construction of Identity and Difference in a City of Myth, 1948–2012 by Thomas Philip Abowd
Review by: Michael Dumper
Journal of Palestine Studies Summer 2015, Vol. 44, No. 4: 95-97.

Review: Contested Land, Contested Memory: Israel’s Jews and Arabs and the Ghosts of Catastrophe
Contested Land, Contested Memory: Israel’s Jews and Arabs and the Ghosts of Catastrophe by Jo Roberts
Review by: Awad Halabi
Journal of Palestine Studies Summer 2015, Vol. 44, No. 4: 97-98.

Review: Conscientious Objectors in Israel: Citizenship, Sacrifice, Trials of Fealty
Conscientious Objectors in Israel: Citizenship, Sacrifice, Trials of Fealty by Erica Weiss
Review by: Mark Levine
Journal of Palestine Studies Summer 2015, Vol. 44, No. 4: 99-101.

Review: Producing Spoilers: Peacemaking and the Production of Enmity in a Secular Age
Producing Spoilers: Peacemaking and the Production of Enmity in a Secular Age by Joyce Dalsheim
Review by: Anna Bernard
Journal of Palestine Studies Summer 2015, Vol. 44, No. 4: 101-103.

Review: Violence and Understanding in Gaza: The British Broadsheets’ Coverage of the War
Violence and Understanding in Gaza: The British Broadsheets’ Coverage of the War by Dávid Kaposi
Review by: Ben White
Journal of Palestine Studies Summer 2015, Vol. 44, No. 4: 103-105.

Review: Intellectual Resistance and the Struggle for Palestine
Intellectual Resistance and the Struggle for Palestine by Matthew Abraham
Review by: Bruce Robbins
Journal of Palestine Studies Summer 2015, Vol. 44, No. 4: 105-106.

Review: Steve Sabella: Photography, 1997–2014
Steve Sabella: Photography, 1997–2014 by Hubertus von Amelunxen; Hubertus von Amelunxen; Kamal Boullata
Review by: Dorothea Schoene
Journal of Palestine Studies Summer 2015, Vol. 44, No. 4: 106-108.

SELECTIONS FROM THE PRESS
Journal of Palestine Studies Summer 2015, Vol. 44, No. 4: 109-136.

PHOTOS FROM THE QUARTER
Journal of Palestine Studies Summer 2015, Vol. 44, No. 4: 137-144.

PALESTINE UNBOUND
Journal of Palestine Studies Summer 2015, Vol. 44, No. 4: 145-152.

UPDATE ON CONFLICT AND DIPLOMACY
Paul Karolyi
Journal of Palestine Studies Summer 2015, Vol. 44, No. 4: 153-193.

CONGRESSIONAL MONITOR
Paul Karolyi
Journal of Palestine Studies Summer 2015, Vol. 44, No. 4: 194-243.

DOCUMENTS AND SOURCE MATERIAL
Journal of Palestine Studies Summer 2015, Vol. 44, No. 4: 244-268.

 

New Article: Ben-Artzi et al, Conflict Management and Conflict Resolution as Distinct Negotiation Processes

Ben-Artzi, Ruth, Moty Cristal, and Shirli Kopelman. “Conceptualizing Conflict Management and Conflict Resolution as Distinct Negotiation Processes in the Context of the Enduring Israeli–Palestinian Conflict.” Negotiation and Conflict Management Research 8.1 (2015): 56-63.

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ncmr.12046

Abstract

Negotiations in the Israeli–Palestinian conflict are historically traced and compared through an analysis of conflict resolution (CR) and conflict management (CM), defined as distinct negotiation processes. The assumption that CM is a stepping-stone to CR is challenged: Linking the two processes has not only entrenched but exacerbated this enduring conflict. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

 

Seminar: Azrieli Institute Student-Faculty Seminar (March 18, 2015)

Azrieli-March

 

Azrieli Institute of Israel Studies

Student-Faculty Seminars

Wednesday March 18, 2015

10:30AM-12:30PM

A History of Conflict Between Israel and Palestine: Can the U.N. Ever Facilitate a Two-State Solution?

Kristy Rogers, Masters Candidate, Department of Sociology and Anthropology

 

Why Peacemaking Begins with States and Ends with Societies: Evidence from Arab-Israeli Peace Treaties

Professor Norrin Ripsman, Department of Political Science

 

‘Rebellion Was Strong Amongst Them’: Irish Jews and National Politics, 1900-1922

Mike Rast, PhD Candidate, Department of History

 

Yehuda Kaufman (Even Shmuel): The Portrait of an Israeli Scholar, Intellectual, and Activist, 1927-1976

Professor Ira Robinson, Department of Religion

 

Click here for a PDF file of the flyer.

Conference program: MESA, Washington, DC (22-25 Nov, 2014)

Israel Studies events at the annual conference of MESA, Washington, DC, November 22-25. For full program click here (PDF).

 

AIS–Association for Israel Studies Reception

Saturday, 11/22

Reception, 8:30-10:30pm, McKinley (M)

 

(3681) Settler-Colonialism and the Study of Zionism: Erasure, Transfer and Assimilation

Sunday, November 23, 11am-1pm

Organized by Arnon Degani

Sponsored by Palestinian American Research Center (PARC)

Chair: Gabriel Piterberg, UCLA

 

Discussant: Lorenzo Veracini, Swinburne Inst for Social Research

Susan Slyomovics, UCLA–“The Object of Memory” and Settler Colonialism Studies 16 Years Later

Honaida Ghanim, Palestinian Forum for Israeli Studies–Judaization and De-Indigenization: Settler-Colonialism in East Jerusalem

Areej Sabbagh-Khoury, Mada Al-Carmel–The Zionist Left and Settler-Colonialism in Marj Ibn ‘Amer: Land, Population and Property

Arnon Degani, UCLA–Non-Statist and Bi-Nationalist Zionism as Settler-Colonial Agendas

 

(3756) Rule of Experts?: Revolutions, Doctrines, and Interventions in the Middle East

Sunday, November 23, 2m-4pm

Organized by Osamah Khalil

 

Seth Anziska, Columbia University–Israel, the United States and the 1982 War in Lebanon

 

(3925) World War One and Its Aftermath

Sunday, November 23, 2m-4pm

Chair: Weston F Cook, Jr, UNC Pembroke

 

Roberto Mazza, Western Illinois U–Cemal Pasha, Zionism and the Alleged Expulsion of the Jews from Jaffa in April 1917

 

(3792) Israel Studies in the Arab World

Sunday, November 23, 4:30m-6:30pm

Organized by Johannes Becke

Discussant: Elie Podeh, Hebrew U of Jersusalem

 

Hassan A. Barari, U Jordan–Israelism: Arab Scholarship on Israel, a Critical Assessment

Mostafa Hussein, Brandeis U–Israel Studies in the Arab World Between Two Dictums: ‘Whosoever Learns People’s Language Avoids Their Plot’ and ‘Know Your Enemy’

Johannes Becke, U Oxford–Hebrew in Beirut: Studying Israel in the Last Arab Frontline State

Hebatalla Taha, U Oxford–The Politics of ‘Normalisation’: The Israeli Academic Centre in Cairo

Amr Yossef, American U Cairo–Egyptian Israelists: The View from Israel

 

(3886) Social Media, the Digital Archive, and Scholarly Futures

Sunday, November 23, 4:30m-6:30pm

Organized by Ted Swedenburg

Chair/Discussant: Elliott Colla, Georgetown U

 

Rebecca L. Stein, Duke U–The Perpetrator’s Archive: Israel’s Occupation on YouTube

 

 

(4006) Special Session

Abandoned Yet Central: Gaza and the Resolution of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

Sunday, November 23, 4:30m-6:30pm

Organized by Sara Roy

Chair: Sara Roy, Harvard University

 

Chris Gunness, UNRWA, Office of the Commissioner General, Jerusalem

Paul Aaron, Political Analyst and Consultant, Gaza Community Mental Health Program

Bill Corcoran, American Near East Refugee Aid (ANERA)

Ilana Feldman, George Washington University

Brian Barber, University of Tennessee

Susan Akram, Boston University School of Law

 

This session will present an overview of the past summer’s violent clashes between Israeli and Hamas forces and the ensuing destruction in Gaza. Representatives from the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) and the American Near East Refugee Aid (ANERA) will provide an “on-the-ground” analysis of the destruction and human toll of the 50-day war. Scholars will further place the recent violence in the context of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and examine the prerequisites for a sustainable resolution of the conflict.

 

 

 

(3737) Religious Inclusivity and Civilizational Identity: Expanding Iranian Identities Along Religious, Ethnic, and Gender Lines

Monday, November 24, 8:30am-10:30am

Organized by Lior Sternfeld

Chair/Discussant: Mohamad Tavakoli-Targhi, U Toronto

 

Lior Sternfeld, U Texas Austin–Iran is My Homeland, Jerusalem is My Qiblah: Iranian Jews Between Zionist and Iranian Identities

 

(3643) Israel, the United States and a Changing Middle East

Monday, November 24, 11am-1pm

Organized by Robert O. Freedman

Sponsored by Association for Israel Studies

Chair/Discussant: Robert O. Freedman, Johns Hopkins U

 

Eyal Zisser, Tel Aviv U–Israel and the Arab World – Who’s First – Syria, Egypt or Lebanon?

Ilan Peleg, Lafayette Col–Israel, Netanyahu & the Palestinians: Is the Third Term the Charm?!

Rami Ginat, Bar Ilan U–The Israeli-Egyptian-American Strategic Triangle: A Reassessment in Light of the Arab Uprising

Joshua Teitelbaum, Bar-Ilan U–Israel and the Gulf Cooperation Council: New Opportunities for Cooperation?

Uzi Rabi, Tel Aviv U–Iran and Israel: Post 2013 Elections

 

 

(3697) Bridging the Rupture of 1948: The “Decolonization” and Erasure of Mandate Palestine

Monday, November 24, 2:30pm-4:30pm

Organized by Jeffrey D. Reger and Leena Dallasheh

Sponsored by Palestinian American Research Center (PARC)

Chair: Zachary Lockman, New York U

Discussant: Shira Robinson, George Washington U

 

Jeffrey D. Reger, Georgetown U–Uprooting Palestine: Olive Groves, Mass Dispossession, and Peasant Resistance, 1945-1955

Hilary Falb Kalisman, UC Berkeley–Learning Exile: Palestinian Students and Educators Abroad, 1940-1958

Leena Dallasheh, Rice U–Defying the Rupture, Affirming Presence: Palestinians in Nazareth Surviving 1948

Rephael Stern, Princeton U–Israel’s Postcolonial Predicament and Its Contradicting Jurisdictional Claims in 1948

 

 

(3917) Perilous Peacemaking: Israeli-Palestinian Relations Since Oslo

Monday, November 24, 5pm-7pm

Chair: Timothy Schorn, U South Dakota

 

Elie Podeh, Hebrew U Jerusalem–Missed Opportunities in the Arab-Israeli Conflict: The Case of the Arab Peace Initiative (2002-2014)

Maia Carter Hallward, Kennesaw State U–Choosing to Negotiate Under Sub-Optimal Conditions: The 2013 Israeli-Palestinian Negotiations

Gabriele Mombelli, U Florence–The Palestinian National Authority Security Sector: An Operational Overview

Karam Dana, U Washington–Twenty Years after Oslo: What Do Palestinians Think?

Andrew Barwig, Department of State–“New Blood” in Israel’s Knesset: Elite Circulation and Parliamentary Resilience

 

 

 

(3867) Urbanism and the Politics of the Mandate Period, Local versus Imperial Interests

Tuesday, November 25, 11am-1pm

Organized by Harrison Guthorn

Chair: Elizabeth F. Thompson, U Virginia

 

Noah Hysler Rubin, Bezalel Academy of Art and Design–Planning Palestine: British and Zionist Plans for Tiberius and Nathanya

 

(3893) Public Opinion in the Middle East

Tuesday, November 25, 11am-1pm

Organized by Yael Zeira

 

Devorah Manekin, Arizona State U–Carrots and Sticks: Policy Instruments and Public Opinion in the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

 

(3919) Palestinian Resistance: Spaces and Standpoints

Tuesday, November 25, 11am-1pm

Chair: Timothy Schorn, U South Dakota

 

Timothy Seidel, American U–Narrating Nonviolence: Postcolonial Interrogations of Resistance in Palestine

Maya Rosenfeld, Hebrew U Jerusalem–The Movement of Palestinian Political Prisoners and the Struggle Against the Israeli Occupation: A Historical Perspective

Sharri Plonski, SOAS U London–Transcending Bounded Space: The Struggle for Land and Space by the Palestinian Citizens of Israel

Julie Norman, McGill U–Prisoners Dilemma?: Prison-Based Resistance and the Diffusion of Activism in Palestine

Maryam Griffin, UC Santa Barbara–Movement as/and Non-Movement in Palestine

 

(3949) Transnational Cultural Production

Tuesday, November 25, 1:30pm-3:30pm

Chair: Zeynep Seviner, U Washington

 

Isra Ali, Rutgers, State U of New Jersey–Adaptation: Cultural Alliances and Television Production in Israel and the United States

Robert Lang, U Hartford–Ari Folman’s Waltz with Bashir: Whose Trauma?

Lecture: Hirschfeld, Israeli-Palestinian Peace Process, NYU Taub Center, Sep 15

The Taub Center for Israel Studies at NYU invites you to a lecture:

September 15, 2014

5:00pm

53 Washington Square South

Lessons Learned from the Israeli-Palestinian Peace-Finding Process

Professor Yair Hirschfeld, University of Haifa

      

Dr. Yair Hirschfeld will provide an insider account as to why Secretary Kerry’s Peace Initiative for the Middle East failed and discuss why a less ambitious effort would have prevented the foreseeable break-down of negotiations. Hirschfeld will argue that the definition of peace, as such, is decisive for a successful outcome. It has to be understood that “peace is not a piece of paper, or a given moment, but an ongoing process, when former enemies learn gradually to trust each other.”

Based on this basic understanding Hirschfeld will describe the causes that permitted the successful conclusion of the Oslo Accords, and the dramatic inside story, that caused later failures and set-backs. Hirschfeld will analyze the importance and problems of US mediation, of other inputs of the international community, as well as the impact of the regional powers, and particularly the ongoing struggle between radical militant Islamic state- and non-state actors, with the pragmatic pro-Western Arab states and Israel.              

RSVP via E-mail:  rsvp.taubcenter@nyu.edu

 Co-Sponsored By:

 The Hagop Kevorkian Center for Near Eastern Studies

http://hebrewjudaic.as.nyu.edu/object/taub.speakers https://www.facebook.com/TaubCenterNYU

 

New Article: Wolf, Peacemaking and Political Survival in Sadat’s Egypt

Wolf, Albert B. “Peacemaking and Political Survival in Sadat’s Egypt.” Middle East Policy 21.2 (2014): 127-39.

 

URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/mepo.12076/abstract

 

 

Excerpt

By May 1980, the peace process served as the opposition’s focal point for action against the regime. The Lawyers’ Syndicate joined the opposition and helped groups coordinate with one another. By summer 1981, these forces joined the other syndicates in the country to oppose the treaty with Israel. The opposition cited the Knesset’s passage of a law making Jerusalem the indivisible capital of Israel and the Begin government’s attacks on the PLO in Lebanon as evidence that Sadat had abandoned the Palestinians and was helping to promote Israeli aggression.

The regime’s continued support for normalizing relations with Israel contributed to the outbreak of the protests known as the Autumn of Fury. By September 1981, nearly 1,500 of Sadat’s critics, including the Coptic pope, the supreme guide of the Muslim Brotherhood, and the brother of the man who would murder Sadat, were arrested. Khalid al-Islambouli and three fellow Islamic fundamentalists assassinated Sadat on October 6, 1981, during a military parade commemorating the October War of 1973. Al-Islambouli later said that he was primarily motivated by the signing of the Camp David accords and the Egypt-Israel treaty of 1979.

[…]

This piece provides a first cut into the political consequences for non-democratic leaders pursuing cooperation with enduring rivals: they risk their political survival. Autocracies often use foreign antagonisms as a means to legitimate their rule. When longstanding conflicts are resolved, domestic challengers are provided with a focal point for organizing against the regime and presenting themselves as a patriotic alternative to the incumbent. Ensuing protests threaten to unseat the nominal leadership by unleashing a secondary bandwagon of opposition movements, or by promoting a coup or revolution. In Egypt, peacemaking with Israel led to the Autumn of Fury and the assassination of Anwar Sadat.

This piece indicates a few additional avenues for future research. To what extent are the paper’s results generalizable beyond the Middle East and the Arab-Israeli dispute? Do the domestic pressures examined here give dictators a bargaining advantage with their rivals (as arguments on hands-tying suggest), or do they make dictators seem unreliable and untrustworthy, especially when bargaining over objects that affect the future balance of power. A third direction to investigate is whether these domestic pressures increase the credibility of secret diplomacy. Dictators who are likely to be punished for pursuing cooperation send a costly signal of their benign intent when they “go private” or pursue secret diplomacy with an enemy. When they talk to an adversary behind closed doors, dictators are putting their domestic political survival in the enemy’s hands. If he chooses to make the content of the negotiations public, it could destroy the dictator’s hold on power.

Dissertation: Wallach, Authority, Leadership, and Peacemaking: The Role of the Diasporas

Wallach, Tracy. Authority, Leadership, and Peacemaking: The Role of the Diasporas. A Pilot Study of a Group Relations Conference. Lesley University, 2010.

URL: http://udini.proquest.com/view/authority-leadership-and-goid:862714114/

Abstract

Research suggests that conflicts are much more likely to re-ignite in societies which have large Diaspora communities in the United States. This study examines the role of American Jewish, Arab, and other Middle Eastern Diaspora communities in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, and addresses the generally neglected role of trauma and emotions in perpetuating conflict. The project employed group relations conference methodology to conduct the inquiry. A group relations lens allows one to look at the Israeli-Palestinian conflict at multiple levels: on the psychological level (looking at issues of trauma, identity, collective narrative, emotions and unconscious processes); on the social level (looking at inter-group relations); and on the political level (examining the role of leadership, authority and power dynamics). A pilot conference, Authority, Leadership, and Peacemaking: The Role of the Diasporas was convened April 16-18, 2010. Surveys and interviews were administered before and after the conference in order to examine the impact of the conference on participants. The conference evaluation addressed the following questions: what did participants in the conference learn about the conflict? How did conference participants perceive their individual roles and the collective roles of their respective Diasporas in perpetuating the conflict there? What part might these conferences play in helping participants, as members of their respective Diaspora communities to contribute to the peace process? What processes/variables are at work during the conferences and afterwards that contribute to participant learning and action? The dissertation describes the particular innovations and adaptations made to the group relations conference model; the ways in which the pre-conference and conference dynamics mirrored the dynamics of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict; research design and preliminary findings up to three months post conference. Recommendations for future conferences on the topic are made and implications of the findings for group relations are discussed.

Subject: Middle Eastern Studies; Peace Studies

 

Classification: 0555: Middle Eastern Studies; 0563: Peace Studies

 

Identifier / keyword: Social sciences, Diaspora, Collective narratives, Diaspora(s), Group relations, Inter-group conflict, Israeli-Palestinian Conflict, Peacemaking

Number of pages: 300

Publication year: 2010

Degree date: 2010

School code: 1042

Source: DAI-A 72/06, Dec 2011

Place of publication: Ann Arbor

Country of publication: United States

ISBN: 9781124568669

Advisor: Dallalfar, Arlene

Committee member: Roffman, Eleanor, McRae, Mary

University/institution: Lesley University

Department: School of Education

University location: United States — Massachusetts

Degree: Ph.D.

Source type: Dissertations & Theses

Language: English

Document type: Dissertation/Thesis

Dissertation/thesis number: 3449521

ProQuest document ID: 862714114