New Article: Beinin, Regrouping in the Absence of a Two-State Solution

Beinin, Joel. “Coexistence, Equality, and Universal Principles in Israel/Palestine: Regrouping in the Absence of a Two-State Solution.” Tikkun 30.2 (2015): 9-15.

 

URL: https://muse.jhu.edu/journals/tikkun/v030/30.2.beinin.html

 

Excerpt

The inordinate focus on a Palestinian state has diverted attention from the fate of the Palestinian people. The conditions of many Palestinians — citizens of Israel, inhabitants of the West Bank, East Jerusalem, and the Gaza Strip, and refugees in Lebanon, Syria, and Iraq — have deteriorated dramatically since 2000. Evictions of Palestinians from the East Jerusalem neighborhoods of Sheikh Jarrah and Silwan by messianic religious-nationalist settlers, the expansion of settlements to surround East Jerusalem and prevent its return to Palestinian rule, home demolitions and disruption of normal economic and academic life throughout the West Bank, the siege (tighter or looser as Israel chooses) imposed on the population of the Gaza Strip, attacks on refugee camps in Lebanon and Syria, insecure and dysfunctional conditions throughout Iraq — all these have taken a toll on Palestinians. The most urgent task is to focus on the present and future conditions of actual Palestinians, not to speculate on the nature of a state or states that have little chance of coming into existence anytime soon.

This means exposing and resisting Israeli efforts to diminish the Palestinian presence through various mechanisms of expulsion. It means dismantling the separation barrier and other infrastructures that separate Palestinian communities, including the massive checkpoints at Qalandiya and Bethlehem in the West Bank that are effectively international frontier posts, and opposing the continuing confiscation of lands for new settlements and the violent campaign of settler fanatics like the “Hilltop Youth” to terrorize Palestinian farmers and shepherds. It means demanding an end to Israeli occupation of all the lands conquered in 1967. It means advocating the full equality, including individual and collective rights, of the Palestinian citizens of Israel. Perhaps most painfully for some, but nonetheless absolutely necessary, it means educating ourselves about and recognizing the full extent of the Palestinian Nakba, whose effects continue today. Resolution of the conflict necessitates that we confront our moral obligations as Jews, as Americans, and as global citizens to acknowledge responsibility, make restitution, and pay compensation.

 

New Article: Bouris, The Vicious Cycle of Building and Destroying: the 2014 War on Gaza

Bouris, Dimitris. “The Vicious Cycle of Building and Destroying: the 2014 War on Gaza.” Mediterranean Politics (early view; online first).

 

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13629395.2015.1007000

 

Abstract

The 2014 summer war on Gaza was the third in the last six years and in many ways the most devastating one. While the triggers to this war were the kidnapping and killing of the three Israeli teenagers angazd the subsequent kidnapping and burning alive of a Palestinian teenager, the real reasons can be traced back to the international community’s failed and myopic policies towards Gaza. Moreover, by adopting the ‘West Bank first’ strategy the international community has failed to blow some fresh air into what is left of the so-called Middle East Peace Process and has acted as the abettor of the recent war.

 
 
 
 
 

Reviews: Jones & Petersen, eds., Israel’s Clandestine Diplomacies

Jones, Clive and Tore T. Petersen, eds. Israel’s Clandestine Diplomacies. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2013.

 

9780199330669

 

Reviews

  • Eran, Oded. “Review.” Israel Journal of Foreign Affairs 8.2 (2014): 103-105.
  • Rodman, David. “Review.” Israel Affairs 20.3 (2014): 442-444.
  • Inbar, Efraim. “Review.” Diplomacy & Statecraft 26.1 (2015): 201-202.

 
 
 
 
 

ToC: Israel Affairs 21.1 (2015)

Israel Affairs, Volume 21, Issue 1, January 2015

 

This new issue contains the following articles:

Articles
Ethnic Income Disparities in Israel
Pnina O. Plaut & Steven E. Plaut
Pages: 1-26
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.984418

‘Mayhew’s outcasts’: anti-Zionism and the Arab lobby in Harold Wilson’s Labour Party
James R. Vaughan
Pages: 27-47
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.984420

Israel Negev Bedouin during the 1948 War: Departure and Return
Havatzelet Yahel & Ruth Kark
Pages: 48-97
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.984421

Good news: the Carmel Newsreels and their place in the emerging Israeli language media
Oren Soffer & Tamar Liebes
Pages: 98-111
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.984422

From ‘Rambo’ to ‘sitting ducks’ and back again: the Israeli soldier in the media
Elisheva Rosman & Zipi Israeli
Pages: 112-130
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.984423

Israel and the Arab Gulf states: from tacit cooperation to reconciliation?
Yoel Guzansky
Pages: 131-147
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.984424

Building partnerships between Israeli and Palestinian youth: an integrative approach
Debbie Nathan, David Trimble & Shai Fuxman
Pages: 148-164
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.984436

Book Reviews
Flexigidity: the secret of Jewish adaptability
David Rodman
Pages: 165-166
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.937913

Russia and Israel in the changing Middle East
David Rodman
Pages: 166-167
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.937914

Social mobilization in the Arab–Israeli war of 1948: on the Israeli home front
David Rodman
Pages: 167-169
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.937915

These are my brothers: a dramatic story of heroism during the Yom Kippur War
David Rodman
Pages: 169-171
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.937916

Jews and the military: a history
David Rodman
Pages: 171-173
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.937917

The Jewish revolt: ad 66–74
David Rodman
Pages: 173-173
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.937918

The city besieged: siege and its manifestations in the ancient Near East
David Rodman
Pages: 173-175
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.937919

The forgotten kingdom: the archaeology and history of northern Israel
David Rodman
Pages: 175-176
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.937920

New Book: Oren, Fishing with the President; The Rise of the Diplomatic Spin (in Hebrew)

אורן, יצחק. לדוג עם הנשיא. עלייתו של הספין הדיפלומטי. תל אביב: רסלינג, 2014.

 

book_806_big

 

URL: http://resling.co.il/book.asp?book_id=806

 

Yitzhak Oren’s book examines and analyzes four dramatic events in the relationships between Israel and the United States towards the end of the 20th century, in which the diplomatic spin dominated the chain of events: the loan guarantees crisis, Israel’s willingness to attend the Madrid Conference, the deportation of Hamas leaders, and the receipt of the loan guarantees, accompanied by a journalist speculation about “fishing with the president.” The book further diagnoses and proposes the characteristics of the diplomatic spin as a new and fascinating theoretical field. The author adds to these case studies his personal perspective, as one who experiences the events from within the Prime Minister’s office.

Dr. Yitzhak Oren teaches political science and public diplomacy at the Academic College of Emek Yezreel and Haifa University. In the past he was a political advisor to Prime Ministers Yitzhak Shamir and Yitzhak Rabin, as well as an envoy for US congress matters at the Israeli Embassy in Washington, D.C. and an Ambassador in Nigeria.

New Article: Wildeman and Tartir, Donor Aid in Occupied Palestine in the aftermath of the Arab Uprisings

Wildeman, Jeremy and Alaa Tartir. “Unwilling to Change, Determined to Fail: Donor Aid in Occupied Palestine in the aftermath of the Arab Uprisings.” Mediterranean Politics 19.3 (2014): 431-49.

 

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13629395.2014.967014

 

Abstract

Since 1993 the international community has invested more than $24 billion in ‘peace and development’ in the occupied Palestinian territory (oPt). That aid was meant originally to support the Oslo Peace Process through economic development. However, neither peace nor development has been realized, and both seem increasingly unlikely. While examining donor operations, priorities and the ‘aid-for-peace’ agenda, this article investigates whether patterns in oPt donor aid have changed following the Arab uprisings of 2011. Building on 28 original interviews with Palestine aid actors, it was found that patterns remain unchanged and that donors remain transfixed on a long failed ‘Investment in Peace’ framework that was designed for economic development by the World Bank back in 1993. By comparing these research findings with the literature on aid to Palestine, this article argues that donors are not ready to alter a framework dominated by policy instrumentalists who emphasize pre-determined normative values over actual results, quietly trading financial inducements to Palestinians to forgo political rights within a ‘peace dividends’ model. Meanwhile, critics of the existing aid framework remain largely ignored and have little influence on aid policy, in spite of two decades of instrumentalist failure to produce peace or economic growth using the existing model.

Conference program: MESA, Washington, DC (22-25 Nov, 2014)

Israel Studies events at the annual conference of MESA, Washington, DC, November 22-25. For full program click here (PDF).

 

AIS–Association for Israel Studies Reception

Saturday, 11/22

Reception, 8:30-10:30pm, McKinley (M)

 

(3681) Settler-Colonialism and the Study of Zionism: Erasure, Transfer and Assimilation

Sunday, November 23, 11am-1pm

Organized by Arnon Degani

Sponsored by Palestinian American Research Center (PARC)

Chair: Gabriel Piterberg, UCLA

 

Discussant: Lorenzo Veracini, Swinburne Inst for Social Research

Susan Slyomovics, UCLA–“The Object of Memory” and Settler Colonialism Studies 16 Years Later

Honaida Ghanim, Palestinian Forum for Israeli Studies–Judaization and De-Indigenization: Settler-Colonialism in East Jerusalem

Areej Sabbagh-Khoury, Mada Al-Carmel–The Zionist Left and Settler-Colonialism in Marj Ibn ‘Amer: Land, Population and Property

Arnon Degani, UCLA–Non-Statist and Bi-Nationalist Zionism as Settler-Colonial Agendas

 

(3756) Rule of Experts?: Revolutions, Doctrines, and Interventions in the Middle East

Sunday, November 23, 2m-4pm

Organized by Osamah Khalil

 

Seth Anziska, Columbia University–Israel, the United States and the 1982 War in Lebanon

 

(3925) World War One and Its Aftermath

Sunday, November 23, 2m-4pm

Chair: Weston F Cook, Jr, UNC Pembroke

 

Roberto Mazza, Western Illinois U–Cemal Pasha, Zionism and the Alleged Expulsion of the Jews from Jaffa in April 1917

 

(3792) Israel Studies in the Arab World

Sunday, November 23, 4:30m-6:30pm

Organized by Johannes Becke

Discussant: Elie Podeh, Hebrew U of Jersusalem

 

Hassan A. Barari, U Jordan–Israelism: Arab Scholarship on Israel, a Critical Assessment

Mostafa Hussein, Brandeis U–Israel Studies in the Arab World Between Two Dictums: ‘Whosoever Learns People’s Language Avoids Their Plot’ and ‘Know Your Enemy’

Johannes Becke, U Oxford–Hebrew in Beirut: Studying Israel in the Last Arab Frontline State

Hebatalla Taha, U Oxford–The Politics of ‘Normalisation’: The Israeli Academic Centre in Cairo

Amr Yossef, American U Cairo–Egyptian Israelists: The View from Israel

 

(3886) Social Media, the Digital Archive, and Scholarly Futures

Sunday, November 23, 4:30m-6:30pm

Organized by Ted Swedenburg

Chair/Discussant: Elliott Colla, Georgetown U

 

Rebecca L. Stein, Duke U–The Perpetrator’s Archive: Israel’s Occupation on YouTube

 

 

(4006) Special Session

Abandoned Yet Central: Gaza and the Resolution of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

Sunday, November 23, 4:30m-6:30pm

Organized by Sara Roy

Chair: Sara Roy, Harvard University

 

Chris Gunness, UNRWA, Office of the Commissioner General, Jerusalem

Paul Aaron, Political Analyst and Consultant, Gaza Community Mental Health Program

Bill Corcoran, American Near East Refugee Aid (ANERA)

Ilana Feldman, George Washington University

Brian Barber, University of Tennessee

Susan Akram, Boston University School of Law

 

This session will present an overview of the past summer’s violent clashes between Israeli and Hamas forces and the ensuing destruction in Gaza. Representatives from the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) and the American Near East Refugee Aid (ANERA) will provide an “on-the-ground” analysis of the destruction and human toll of the 50-day war. Scholars will further place the recent violence in the context of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and examine the prerequisites for a sustainable resolution of the conflict.

 

 

 

(3737) Religious Inclusivity and Civilizational Identity: Expanding Iranian Identities Along Religious, Ethnic, and Gender Lines

Monday, November 24, 8:30am-10:30am

Organized by Lior Sternfeld

Chair/Discussant: Mohamad Tavakoli-Targhi, U Toronto

 

Lior Sternfeld, U Texas Austin–Iran is My Homeland, Jerusalem is My Qiblah: Iranian Jews Between Zionist and Iranian Identities

 

(3643) Israel, the United States and a Changing Middle East

Monday, November 24, 11am-1pm

Organized by Robert O. Freedman

Sponsored by Association for Israel Studies

Chair/Discussant: Robert O. Freedman, Johns Hopkins U

 

Eyal Zisser, Tel Aviv U–Israel and the Arab World – Who’s First – Syria, Egypt or Lebanon?

Ilan Peleg, Lafayette Col–Israel, Netanyahu & the Palestinians: Is the Third Term the Charm?!

Rami Ginat, Bar Ilan U–The Israeli-Egyptian-American Strategic Triangle: A Reassessment in Light of the Arab Uprising

Joshua Teitelbaum, Bar-Ilan U–Israel and the Gulf Cooperation Council: New Opportunities for Cooperation?

Uzi Rabi, Tel Aviv U–Iran and Israel: Post 2013 Elections

 

 

(3697) Bridging the Rupture of 1948: The “Decolonization” and Erasure of Mandate Palestine

Monday, November 24, 2:30pm-4:30pm

Organized by Jeffrey D. Reger and Leena Dallasheh

Sponsored by Palestinian American Research Center (PARC)

Chair: Zachary Lockman, New York U

Discussant: Shira Robinson, George Washington U

 

Jeffrey D. Reger, Georgetown U–Uprooting Palestine: Olive Groves, Mass Dispossession, and Peasant Resistance, 1945-1955

Hilary Falb Kalisman, UC Berkeley–Learning Exile: Palestinian Students and Educators Abroad, 1940-1958

Leena Dallasheh, Rice U–Defying the Rupture, Affirming Presence: Palestinians in Nazareth Surviving 1948

Rephael Stern, Princeton U–Israel’s Postcolonial Predicament and Its Contradicting Jurisdictional Claims in 1948

 

 

(3917) Perilous Peacemaking: Israeli-Palestinian Relations Since Oslo

Monday, November 24, 5pm-7pm

Chair: Timothy Schorn, U South Dakota

 

Elie Podeh, Hebrew U Jerusalem–Missed Opportunities in the Arab-Israeli Conflict: The Case of the Arab Peace Initiative (2002-2014)

Maia Carter Hallward, Kennesaw State U–Choosing to Negotiate Under Sub-Optimal Conditions: The 2013 Israeli-Palestinian Negotiations

Gabriele Mombelli, U Florence–The Palestinian National Authority Security Sector: An Operational Overview

Karam Dana, U Washington–Twenty Years after Oslo: What Do Palestinians Think?

Andrew Barwig, Department of State–“New Blood” in Israel’s Knesset: Elite Circulation and Parliamentary Resilience

 

 

 

(3867) Urbanism and the Politics of the Mandate Period, Local versus Imperial Interests

Tuesday, November 25, 11am-1pm

Organized by Harrison Guthorn

Chair: Elizabeth F. Thompson, U Virginia

 

Noah Hysler Rubin, Bezalel Academy of Art and Design–Planning Palestine: British and Zionist Plans for Tiberius and Nathanya

 

(3893) Public Opinion in the Middle East

Tuesday, November 25, 11am-1pm

Organized by Yael Zeira

 

Devorah Manekin, Arizona State U–Carrots and Sticks: Policy Instruments and Public Opinion in the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

 

(3919) Palestinian Resistance: Spaces and Standpoints

Tuesday, November 25, 11am-1pm

Chair: Timothy Schorn, U South Dakota

 

Timothy Seidel, American U–Narrating Nonviolence: Postcolonial Interrogations of Resistance in Palestine

Maya Rosenfeld, Hebrew U Jerusalem–The Movement of Palestinian Political Prisoners and the Struggle Against the Israeli Occupation: A Historical Perspective

Sharri Plonski, SOAS U London–Transcending Bounded Space: The Struggle for Land and Space by the Palestinian Citizens of Israel

Julie Norman, McGill U–Prisoners Dilemma?: Prison-Based Resistance and the Diffusion of Activism in Palestine

Maryam Griffin, UC Santa Barbara–Movement as/and Non-Movement in Palestine

 

(3949) Transnational Cultural Production

Tuesday, November 25, 1:30pm-3:30pm

Chair: Zeynep Seviner, U Washington

 

Isra Ali, Rutgers, State U of New Jersey–Adaptation: Cultural Alliances and Television Production in Israel and the United States

Robert Lang, U Hartford–Ari Folman’s Waltz with Bashir: Whose Trauma?

New Article: Pressman, American Engagement and the Pathways to Arab–Israeli Peace

Pressman, Jeremy. “American Engagement and the Pathways to Arab–Israeli Peace.” Cooperation and Conflict 49.4 (2014): 536-53.

 

URL: http://cac.sagepub.com/content/49/4/536.abstract

 

Abstract

This close empirical study of decades of US efforts to bring peace between Arab states and Israel helps reflect on Arild Underdal and Oran R. Young’s leadership typologies. Distinguishing between coercive leadership based on the incentives and sanctions that robust capabilities make possible and instrumental leadership focused more on talking, skilled mediation, and policy innovation is useful. However, this US mediation demonstrates that the two are not wholly distinct as previously suggested. The narrative of US efforts from Richard M Nixon to William J Clinton, including 22 cases of US involvement in Arab–Israeli mediation, suggests successful US mediation has been based on four factors. US involvement has led to breakthroughs when the US administration was highly engaged and kept at the problem after an initial diplomatic setback; benefitted from an exogenous event; managed that event to the US advantage; and dealt with strong Arab and Israeli partners.

New Article: Podeh, Israel and the Arab Peace Initiative, 2002–2014

Podeh, Elie. “Israel and the Arab Peace Initiative, 2002–2014: A Plausible Missed Opportunity.” Middle East Journal 68.4 (2014): 584-603.

 

URL: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/the_middle_east_journal/v068/68.4.podeh.html

 

Excerpt

A well-known Israeli maxim — attributed to Israel’s legendary foreign minister Abba Eban — holds that “the Arabs [or Palestinians] never miss an opportunity to miss an opportunity.” The analysis of Israel’s position toward the API demonstrates that the Arabs and the Palestinians have no monopoly on missed opportunities in the century-long conflict. In fact, my research on missed opportunities in the conflict shows that Israel missed quite a few opportunities, of which the API was probably the greatest.

The API is still on the negotiating table. Only recently, Turki Al-Faisal, former director of the Saudi intelligence agency and former ambassador to the UK and US, argued that the initiative “still provides a template for peace.” Indeed, the convergence of the following developments in the Middle East has once again created an opportunity to relaunch the API: First, John Kerry’s failure to broker a bilateral Israeli-Palestinian agreement due to both parties’ intransigent positions; second, the rise and success of jihadist elements in the Middle East, which creates fertile ground for potential cooperation between Israel and the moderate forces in the Arab world; third, the instability in the Arab world caused by the negative ramifications of the Arab Spring; fourth, the war in Gaza between Israel and Hamas, which highlighted that only a regional solution to the conflict would be able to tackle the entire Palestinian problem. In light of these sea changes in the Middle East, the API seems to be the main avenue for a diplomatic breakthrough that would bring some stability to an area besieged by turmoil. Based on its history, the chances that Israel will pick up the gauntlet are slim, but the country now has an opportunity to correct mistakes made over the last 12 years.

New Book: Peters and Newman, eds. The Routledge Handbook on the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

Peters, Joel and David Newman, eds. The Routledge Handbook on the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict. London and New York: Routledge, 2013.

 

URL: http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415778626/

9780415778626

Abstract

The Israeli-Palestinian conflict is one of the most prominent issues in world politics today. Few other issues have dominated the world’s headlines and have attracted such attention from policy makers, the academic community, political analysts, and the world’s media.

The Routledge Handbook on the Israeli- Palestinian Conflict offers a comprehensive and accessible overview of the most contentious and protracted political issue in the Middle East. Bringing together a range of top experts from Israel, Palestine, Europe and North America the Handbook tackles a range of topics including:

  • The historical background to the conflict
  • peace efforts
  • domestic politics
  • critical issues such as displacement, Jerusalem and settler movements
  • the role of outside players such as the Arab states, the US and the EU

This Handbook provides the reader with an understanding of the complexity of the issues that need to be addressed in order to resolve the conflict, and a detailed examination of the varied interests of the actors involved. In-depth analysis of the conflict is supplemented by a chronology of the conflict, key documents and a range of maps.

The contributors are all leading authorities in their field and have published extensively on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict/peace process. Many have played a leading role in various Track II initiatives accompanying the peace process.

 

Table of Contents

Part 1: Competing Nationalisms

1. The Origins of Zionism Colin Schindler

2. The Palestinian National Movement: from self-rule to statehood Ahmad Samih Khalidi

Part 2:Narratives and Key Moments

3. Competing Israeli and Palestinan Narratives Paul Scham

4. The 1948 War: The Battle over History Kirsten E. Schulze

5. The First and Second Palestinian Intifadas Rami Nasrallah

6. The Camp David Summit: a Tale of Two Narratives Joel Peters

 

Part 3: Seeking Peace

7.The Israeli-Palestinian Peace Process: 1967-1993 Laura Zittrain Eisenberg

8. Peace Plans: 1993-2012 Galia Golan

Part 4: Issues

9.Palestinian Refugees Rex Brynen

10. Jerusalem Michael Dumper

11. Territory and Borders David Newman

12. Water Julie Trottier

13. Terrorism Magnus Norell

14. Religion Yehezkel Landau

15. Economics Arie Arnon

16. Unilaterlaism and Separation Gerald M. Steinberg

17. Gaza Joel Peters

Part 5: Domestic Actors

18.The Palestine Liberation Organization Nigel Parsons

19. The Palestinian Authority Nigel Parsons

20. Hamas Khaled Hroub

21. Palestinian Civil Society Michael Schulz

22. Gush Emunim and the Israeli Settler Movement David Newman

23. The Israeli Peace Movements Naomi Chazan

Part 6: International Engagement

24. Palestinian Citizens of Israel Amal Jamal

25. The United States: 1948- 1993 Steven L. Spiegel

26. The United States: 1993-2010 Steven L. Spiegel

27. Russia Robert O. Freedman

28. Europe Rosemary Hollis

29. The Arab World P. R. Kumaraswamy

30. The Jewish Diaspora and the Pro-Israel Lobby Dov Waxman

Chronology Steve Lutes

New Article: Ben-Meir, Israeli-Palestinian Negotiations: The US Framework for Peace Must Be Enforced

Ben-Meir, Alon. “The Israeli-Palestinian Negotiations: The US Framework for Peace Must Be Enforced.” Mediterranean Quarterly 25.3 (2014): 40-51.

 

 

URL: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/mediterranean_quarterly/v025/25.3.ben-meir.html

 

Abstract

There are many who doubt that the current Israeli-Palestinian negotiations will lead to a solution, in spite of US secretary of state John Kerry’s efforts and the presumed commitment to peace of Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Palestinian president Mahmoud Abbas. What has characterized the intractability of the conflict in the past, including the future of Jerusalem, the Palestinian refugees, Israel’s national security concerns, and, in particular, the psychological dimension behind these conflicting issues, still remain in play. That intractability has been further aggravated by a faulty framework for the 2014 negotiations, the absence of leadership, the continued public recrimination of each side toward the other, mutual distrust, and the lack of commitment to reach an agreement that of necessity requires mutually painful concessions. This essay proposes a number of mechanisms and corrective measures that could appreciably enhance the prospect of reaching a peace agreement. Undergirding these proposals is the need for the United States to put its foot down and warn both the Israelis and Palestinians that, unless they negotiate in earnest based on Kerry’s proposed framework, there will be serious consequences resulting from a reassessment of its bilateral relations with both parties.

 

New Article: Aharoni, The Gender–Culture Double Bind in Israeli–Palestinian Peace Negotiations

Aharoni, Sarai B. “The Gender–Culture Double Bind in Israeli–Palestinian Peace Negotiations: A Narrative Approach.” Security Dialogue 45.4 (2014): 373-90.

 

URL: http://sdi.sagepub.com/content/45/4/373.abstract

 

Abstract

This article investigates structural conditions for women’s inclusion/exclusion in peace negotiations by focusing on the linkage between acts of gender stereotyping and cultural framing. Through a narrative analysis of semi-structured interviews with Israeli negotiators and administrators who participated in official negotiations during the Oslo peace process, I link two recent claims about how gender may affect negotiators’ understandings of strategic exchange: the gendered devaluation effect and the gender–culture double bind hypothesis. Building upon postcolonial feminist critique, I argue that narratives about women and cultural difference (a) demonstrate and engage with Israeli essentialist and Orientalist discourses about Arab culture and masculinity; (b) manifest how ideas about strategic dialogue and negotiations are gendered; and (c) convey how policymakers and negotiators may use cultural claims to rationalize women’s exclusion from diplomatic and strategic dialogue. Furthermore, the study implies that dominant framings of Israeli–Palestinian negotiations as a binary East–West encounter need to be replaced by a more nuanced conceptualization of cultural identity that captures contextual aspects of difference, including the existence of military power and masculine dominance.

New Article: Mnookin, Eiran, and Gilad, Negotiation Lessons from Israel’s ‘Unilateral’ Gaza Withdrawal

Mnookin, Robert H., Ehud Eiran, and Shula Gilad. “Is Unilateralism Always Bad? Negotiation Lessons from Israel’s ‘Unilateral’ Gaza Withdrawal.” Negotiation Journal 30.2 (2014): 131-156.‏

URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/nejo.12051/abstract

 

Abstract

Using the 2005 unilateral Israeli withdrawal from Gaza as a case study, this article exposes an apparent paradox: circumstances may exist in which an outcome that serves the interests of parties to a conflict cannot be achieved through bilateral negotiation but can be achieved by unilateral action. Although the withdrawal was seen at the time as serving the interests of both the Israeli government and the Palestinians, we argue that the same result could not have been achieved through bilateral negotiations. “Behind-the-table” internal conflicts on each side would have made it impossible for the leaders to agree on the scope of these negotiations.

Prime Minister Ariel Sharon’s success in implementing his Gaza withdrawal was attributable in significant measure to his ability to maintain ambiguity about his long-run plans for the West Bank. Only by focusing attention on Gaza was he able to build the necessary coalition to implement the controversial move. The Palestinian leaders, on the other hand, could never have agreed to come to the table to negotiate about Gaza alone — they would have insisted that the scope of any negotiations address a broad range of final status issues.

In this article, we identify some of the lessons that the Gaza example teaches regarding the utility and limits of unilateralism as well as the benefits and potential costs of employing ambiguity as a strategy to help accomplish a controversial move. Finally, we also explore the aftermath of the withdrawal and its many missed opportunities for improving the outcome. We suggest that, even when acting unilaterally, leaders should carefully consider the probable impact of their actions on the internal conflicts of their adversaries.

See also responses by Gilead Sher (pp. 157-163); and James K. Sebenius (pp. 165-168)

ToC: Israel Affairs, 19.4 (2013)

Israel Affairs: Volume 19, Issue 4, 2013

Articles

Anatomy of decline: Anglo-Soviet competition in the Middle East, 1956–67

Moshe Gat
pages 603-622

DOI:10.1080/13537121.2013.829610
The impact of the cold war on the Thatcher government’s Middle East policy

Azriel Bermant
pages 623-639

DOI:10.1080/13537121.2013.829607

Ending the Second Lebanon War: the interface between the political and military echelons in Israel

Shmuel Tzabag
pages 640-659

DOI:10.1080/13537121.2013.829614
The ‘Annapolis Process’: a chronology of failure

Amira Schiff
pages 660-678

DOI:10.1080/13537121.2013.829612

War and peace in Judaism and Islam

Moshe Cohen
pages 679-692

DOI:10.1080/13537121.2013.829608

A reassessment of the 1967 Arab oil embargo

Joseph Mann
pages 693-703

DOI:10.1080/13537121.2013.829611

Paradigmatic changes in perceptions of disciplinary and multidisciplinary teaching in Israeli higher education system: fad or challenge?

Nitza Davidovitch
pages 704-712

DOI:10.1080/13537121.2013.829609

Election year economics and political budget cycle in Israel – myth or reality

Tal Shahor
pages 713-730

DOI:10.1080/13537121.2013.829613

Review Essay

The politics of the Israeli Pantheon

Nissim Leon
pages 731-734

DOI:10.1080/13537121.2013.829615

Book Reviews

60 years: Israel navy

David Rodman
pages 735-736

DOI:10.1080/13537121.2013.829616

Legacy: a genetic history of the Jewish people

David Rodman
page 736

DOI:10.1080/13537121.2013.829618

Mossad; Spies against Armageddon: inside Israel’s secret wars

David Rodman
pages 737-738

DOI:10.1080/13537121.2013.829619

Moshe Dayan: Israel’s controversial hero

David Rodman
pages 738-739

DOI:10.1080/13537121.2013.829620

Abdullah al-Tall, Arab Legion officer: Arab nationalism and opposition to the Hashemite regime

David Rodman
pages 739-740

DOI:10.1080/13537121.2013.829621

Israel: the will to prevail

David Rodman
pages 740-741

DOI:10.1080/13537121.2013.829622

The promise of Israel: why its seemingly greatest weakness is actually its greatest strength

David Rodman
pages 741-742

DOI:10.1080/13537121.2013.829623

Judah in the Neo-Babylonian period: the archaeology of desolation

David Rodman
pages 742-743

DOI:10.1080/13537121.2013.829624

Struggling over Israel’s soul: an IDF general speaks of his controversial moral decisions

David Rodman
pages 743-744

DOI:10.1080/13537121.2013.829625

Asset test: how the United States benefits from its alliance with Israel

David Rodman
pages 744-746

DOI:10.1080/13537121.2013.829617

Editorial Board

Editorial Board

New Publication: Matar and Harb, Narrating Conflict in the Middle East

Dina Matar (author), Zahera Harb (author), eds. Narrating Conflict in the Middle East: Discourse, Image and Communications Practices in Lebanon and Palestine. London: Tauris, 2013.

Narrating the conflict - cover

The term conflict has often been used broadly and uncritically to talk
about diverse situations ranging from street protests to war, though the
many factors that give rise to any conflict and its continuation over a
period of time vary greatly. The starting point of this innovative book
is that it is unsatisfactory either to consider conflict within a
singular concept or alternatively to consider each conflict as entirely
distinct and unique; Narrating Conflict in the Middle East explores
another path to addressing long-term conflict. The contributors set out
to examine the ways in which such conflicts in Palestine and Lebanon
have been and are narrated, imagined and remembered in diverse spaces,
including that of the media. They examine discourses and representations
of the conflicts as well as practices of memory and performance in
narratives of suffering and conflict, all of which suggest an embodied
investment in narrating or communicating conflict. In so doing, they
engage with local, global, and regional realities in Lebanon and in
Palestine and they respond dynamically to these realities.

Table of Contents

Introduction

Approaches to Narrating Conflict in Palestine and Lebanon: Practices, Discourses and Memories Dina Matar and Zahera Harb

      Practices

Just a Few Small Changes: The Limits of Televisual Palestinian Representation of Conflicts within the Transnational ‘Censorscape’ Matt Sienkiewicz

Mediating Internal Conflict in Lebanon and its Ethical Boundaries Zahera Harb

Negotiating Representation, Re-making War: Transnationalism, Counter-hegemony and Contemporary Art from Post-Taif Beirut Hanan Toukan

Narratives in Conflict: Emile Habibi’s al-Waqa’i al-Ghariba and Elia Suleiman’s Divine Intervention Refqa Abu-Remaileh

      Discourses

Islam in the Narrative of Fatah and Hamas Atef Alshaer

Al Manar: Cultural Discourse and Representation of Resistance Rounwah Adly Riyadh Bseiso

The Battle over Victimhood: Roles and Implications of Narratives of Suffering in the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict Kirkland Newman Smulders

The ‘I Love…’ Phenomenon in Lebanon: The Transmutations of Discourse, its Impact on Civil Society, the Media and Democratization Carole Helou

      Memories and Narration

Making Sense of War News among Adolescents in Lebanon: The Politics of Solidarity and Partisanship Helena Nassif

Narrating the Nakba: Palestinian Filmmakers Revisit 1948 Nadia Yaqub

Bearing Witness to Al Nakba in a Time of Denial Teodora Todorova

 

USE discount code for special offer on paperback: BOUNDARIES

Cite: Lustick, Israel Needs a New Map

Lustick, Ian. “Israel Needs a New Map.” Middle East Policy 20.2 (2013): 25-37.

 

URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/mepo.12017/abstract

 

Abstract

The predicament Israelis face can be summarized with a simple allegory.
Imagine a family car trip. I live in Philadelphia — let’s imagine a trip
in Pennsylvania. The family piles into the car, and heads out onto the
road. They’ve got a map of Pennsylvania. The map shows where to go and
where not to go for swimming, camping, hiking and so on. Here’s the
Delaware River gap, here are the Pocono mountains. Relying on that same
map, they cross the Susquehanna River. It is going north to south, just
the way it’s supposed to. All is well, all is understandable. But
imagine that the family continues driving and they end up in Montana or
Texas, but all they’ve got is that map of Pennsylvania. They keep
relying on it. But that map is not going to help them find their way,
it’s going to produce nothing but confusion, false certainty,
irritation, anger and frustration. The Rio Grande will be mistaken as
the Ohio, the Poconos will be enormously larger than they’re supposed to
be. Without a new map or at least the realization that the old map
cannot possibly provide guidance, the trip can only end in
disillusionment and disaster, to say nothing of bitter disputes within
the car over who misinterpreted the map and who is responsible for the
wrong turns.

Reviews: Hammack, Narrative and the Politics of Identity

Hammack, Phillip L. Narrative and the Politics of Identity. The Cultural Psychology of Israeli and Palestinian Youth. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2011.

Cover for Narrative and the Politics of Identity

Reviews

  • Chappell, Larry W. “Review.” Journal of Political Science Education 8.2 (2012): 226-7.
  • Friedman, Adina. “Review.” Peace Review 25.2 (2013): 318-21.

ToC: Journal of Palestine Studies 42.2 (2013)

URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/jps.2013.42.issue-2

  1. Cover

    DOI: 10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.cover

    Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.cover

  2. Front Matter

    DOI: 10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.fm

    Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.fm

  3. Table of Contents

    DOI: 10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.toc

    Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.toc

  4. From the Editor (p. 5) 

    Rashid I. Khalidi

    DOI: 10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.5

    Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.5

  5. Article
    1. The Zionist Disinformation Campaign in Syria and Lebanon during the Palestinian Revolt, 1936–1939 (pp. 6-25) 

      Mahmoud Muhareb

      DOI: 10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.6

      Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.6

  6. Essay
    1. The Other Shift: Settler Colonialism, Israel, and the Occupation (pp. 26-42) 

      Lorenzo Veracini

      DOI: 10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.26

      Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.26

  7. Profile
    1. Tony Blair’s Tangled Web: The Quartet Representative and the Peace Process (pp. 43-60) 

      Jonathan Cook

      DOI: 10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.43

      Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.43

  8. Interview
    1. Between Hamas and the PA: An Interview with Islamic Jihad’s Khalid al-Batsh (pp. 61-70) 

      Mouin Rabbani

      DOI: 10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.61

      Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.61

  9. IPS Roundtable
    1. The Palestine Question Amid Regional Transformations (pp. 71-92) 

      DOI: 10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.71

      Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.71

  10. Recent Books
    1. Memoirs of a Soldier
      1. Year of the Locust: A Soldier’s Diary and the Erasure of Palestine’s Ottoman Past (pp. 93-94) 

        Year of the Locust: A Soldier’s Diary and the Erasure of Palestine’s Ottoman Past by Salim Tamari

        Review by: Rochelle Davis

        DOI: 10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.93

        Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.93

    2. Teaching Palestine
      1. The Politics of Teaching Palestine to Americans: Addressing Pedagogical Strategies (pp. 94-95) 

        The Politics of Teaching Palestine to Americans: Addressing Pedagogical Strategies by Marcy Jane Knopf-Newman

        Review by: Matthew Abraham

        DOI: 10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.94

        Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.94

    3. Global Activism
      1. Boycott, Divestment, Sanctions: The Global Struggle for Palestinian Rights (pp. 95-97) 

        Boycott, Divestment, Sanctions: The Global Struggle for Palestinian Rights by Omar Barghouti

        Review by: Noura Erakat

        DOI: 10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.95

        Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.95

    4. Memoir as Pedagogy
      1. The General’s Son: Journey of an Israeli in Palestine (pp. 97-98) 

        The General’s Son: Journey of an Israeli in Palestine by Miko Peled

        Review by: Anna Bernard

        DOI: 10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.97

        Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.97

    5. Theorizing Palestinian Decolonization
      1. The Palestine Nakba: Decolonising History, Narrating the Subaltern, Reclaiming Memory (pp. 98-100) 

        The Palestine Nakba: Decolonising History, Narrating the Subaltern, Reclaiming Memory by Nur Masalha

        Review by: Steven Salaita

        DOI: 10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.98

        Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.98

    6. Gender and Citizenship
      1. Women in Israel: Race, Gender and Citizenship (pp. 100-101) 

        Women in Israel: Race, Gender and Citizenship by Nahla Abdo

        Review by: Leena Dallasheh

        DOI: 10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.100

        Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.100

    7. Zionism and Its Aftermath
      1. Might Over Right: How the Zionists Took Over Palestine (pp. 101-102) 

        Might Over Right: How the Zionists Took Over Palestine by Adel Safty

        Review by: Michael Fischbach

        DOI: 10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.101

        Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.101

    8. An Impassioned Account
      1. The Punishment of Gaza (p. 103) 

        The Punishment of Gaza by Gideon Levy

        Review by: Edward Sayre

        DOI: 10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.103

        Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.103

  11. Arab Views (pp. 104-105) 

    DOI: 10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.104

    Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.104

  12. Selections from the Press( pp. 106-120) 

    DOI: 10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.106

    Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.106

  13. Photos from the Quarter (pp. 121-127) 

    DOI: 10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.121

    Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.121

  14. Quarterly Update on Conflict and Diplomacy: 16 August–15 November 2012 (pp. 128-142) 

    Review by: Ben White

    DOI: 10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.128

    Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.128

  15. Settlement Monitor (pp. 143-158) 

    Review by: Geoffrey Aronson

    DOI: 10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.143

    Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.143

  16. Documents and Source Material (pp. 159-187) 

    DOI: 10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.159

    Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.159

  17. Bibliography of Periodical Literature (pp. 188-199) 

    Review by: Norbert Scholz

    DOI: 10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.188

    Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/jps.2013.42.2.188

ToC: Israel Studies 18,2 (2013): Shared Narratives—A Palestinian-Israeli Dialogue

http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2979/israelstudies.18.issue-2

 

Guest Editors: Paul Scham, Benjamin Pogrund, and As’ad Ghanem

  1. Note from the Editors of Israel Studies(p. v) 

    Ilan Troen and Natan Aridan

    DOI: 10.2979/israelstudies.18.2.v

    Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2979/israelstudies.18.2.v

  2. Preface(pp. vii-viii) 

    Daniel C. Kurtzer

    DOI: 10.2979/israelstudies.18.2.vii

    Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2979/israelstudies.18.2.vii

  3. Introduction to Shared Narratives—A Palestinian-Israeli Dialogue(pp. 1-10) 

    Paul Scham, Benjamin Pogrund and As’ad Ghanem

    DOI: 10.2979/israelstudies.18.2.1

    Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2979/israelstudies.18.2.1 

 

A Comparison between Zionism and Palestinian Nationalism

  1. Palestinian Nationalism: An Overview(pp. 11-29) 

    As’ad Ghanem

    DOI: 10.2979/israelstudies.18.2.11

    Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2979/israelstudies.18.2.11

  2. The Zionist/Jewish and Palestinian/Arab National Movements: The Question of Legitimacy—A Comparative Observation(pp. 30-40) 

    Moshe Maoz

    DOI: 10.2979/israelstudies.18.2.30

    Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2979/israelstudies.18.2.30

Approaches over Time to the ‘Other Narrative’

  1. To Understand Oneself: Does it Mean to Understand the Other?—Reflections(pp. 41-52) 

    Yosef Gorny

    DOI: 10.2979/israelstudies.18.2.41

    Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2979/israelstudies.18.2.41

  2. Israelis and Palestinians: Contested Narratives(pp. 53-69) 

    Mohammed S. Dajani Daoudi and Zeina M. Barakat

    DOI: 10.2979/israelstudies.18.2.53

    Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2979/israelstudies.18.2.53

Comparison of Palestinians after the Nakba and Jews after the Holocaust

  1. We Israelis Remember, But How? The Memory of the Holocaust and the Israeli Experience(pp. 70-85) 

    Dalia Ofer

    DOI: 10.2979/israelstudies.18.2.70

    Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2979/israelstudies.18.2.70

  2. The Palestinian Nakba and its Continuous Repercussions(pp. 86-99) 

    Adel Manna’

    DOI: 10.2979/israelstudies.18.2.86

    Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2979/israelstudies.18.2.86

Concepts of Land

  1. Israeli Views of the Land of Israel/Palestine(pp. 100-114) 

    S. Ilan Troen

    DOI: 10.2979/israelstudies.18.2.100

    Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2979/israelstudies.18.2.100

The Growth of Religious Nationalism and the Conflict over the Holy Places

  1. Narratives of Jerusalem and its Sacred Compound(pp. 115-132) 

    Yitzhak Reiter

    DOI: 10.2979/israelstudies.18.2.115

    Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2979/israelstudies.18.2.115

Zionism and Palestinian Nationalism; Possibilities of Recognition and Reconciliation

  1. Zionism and Palestinian Nationalism: Possibilities of Recognition(pp. 133-147) 

    Tamar S. Hermann

    DOI: 10.2979/israelstudies.18.2.133

    Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2979/israelstudies.18.2.133

  2. Recognition of the Other and His Past(pp. 148-155) 

    Said Zeedani

    DOI: 10.2979/israelstudies.18.2.148

    Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2979/israelstudies.18.2.148

  1. Notes on Contributors(pp. 156-158) 

    DOI: 10.2979/israelstudies.18.2.156

    Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2979/israelstudies.18.2.156

  2. Guidelines for Contributors(pp. 159-161) 

    DOI: 10.2979/israelstudies.18.2.159

    Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2979/israelstudies.18.2.159