New Article: Shloim et al, UK and Israeli Women’s Accounts of Motherhood and Feeding

Shloim, N., S, Hugh-Jones, M.C.J Rudolf, R.G. Feltbower, O. Loans, and M. M. Hetherington. “‘It’s like giving him a piece of me’: Exploring UK and Israeli Women’s Accounts of Motherhood and Feeding.” Appetite 95 (2015): 58-66.

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2015.06.004

Abstract

Abstract

Objective

The present study explored how Israeli and UK mothers integrate feeding into their conceptualisations of mothering 2–6 months post-partum.

Background

The nature and importance of motherhood is subject to differential contextual, cultural, political and historical influences. We set out to compare experiences of motherhood and feeding between these two countries using a qualitative approach.

Methods

Forty one women (mean age 36.4 ± 2.7 years) from Israel and the UK, mostly married or in a committed relationship were interviewed about their experience of pregnancy, motherhood and feeding. Data were analysed thematically.

Results

The experience of motherhood in the early postnatal period was dominated, for all mothers, by the experience of breastfeeding and clustered around three representations of mothering, namely; 1) a devoted mother who ignores her own needs; 2) a mother who is available for her infant but acknowledges her needs as well; and 3) a struggling mother for whom motherhood is a burden. Such representations existed within both cultural groups and sometimes coexisted within the same mothers. UK women described more struggles within motherhood whereas a tendency towards idealising motherhood was observed for Israeli women.

Conclusion

There are similarities in the ways that UK and Israeli women experienced motherhood and feeding. Where family life is strongly emphasized, mothers reported extremes of idealism and burden and associated an “ideal” mother with a breastfeeding mother. Where motherhood is represented as just one of many roles women take up, they are more likely to represent a “good enough” approach to mothering. Understanding the experience of motherhood and feeding in different cultural settings is important to provide the context for postnatal care specifically where mothers are reluctant to share problems or difficulties encountered.

New Article: Shechory-Bitton et al, Parenting Styles Among Jewish and Arab Muslim Israeli Mothers

Shechory-Bitton, Mally, Sarah Ben David and Eliane Sommerfeld. “Effect of Ethnicity on Parenting Styles and Attitudes Toward Violence Among Jewish and Arab Muslim Israeli Mothers. An Intergenerational Approach.” Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology 46.4 (2015): 508-24.

 

URL: http://jcc.sagepub.com/content/46/4/508

 

Abstract

The cultural heterogeneity of Israeli society creates a unique opportunity to study the effects of ethnicity and intergenerational differences on parenting styles, attitudes, and practices. Three groups of mother–daughter dyads took part in the study: Native-born Jewish (NBJ) Israelis (155 dyads), Jewish Mizrahi (JM) immigrants (immigrants from Muslim countries (133 dyads), and native-born Arab Muslim (NBA) Israelis (86 dyads). Participants were located through a “snowball” process in which participants referred their friends to the researchers or gave the researchers names of potential participants. Interethnic differences were found in the mothers’ generation, with JM mothers falling in between NBJ and NBA mothers. This trend changed when we examined differences between the daughters. Although intergenerational differences were found in all groups, the differences were more prominent among Jewish mother–daughter dyads than among mother–daughter dyads in the Muslim population. Contrary to the research hypothesis, the parenting style of JM women was closer to that of NBJ mothers than to NBA mothers. The findings are discussed with reference to the complexity of Israeli society and to the encounter between the culture of the immigrant women who came from Muslim countries and the Western culture of the host society.

 
 
 

New Article: Shechory-Bitton and Ben-David, Intergenerational Differences in Parenting Styles of Mother–Daughter Dyads among Immigrants and Native-Born Israelis

Shechory-Bitton, Mally and Sarah Ben-David. “Intergenerational Differences in Parenting Styles of Mother–Daughter Dyads among Immigrants and Native-Born Israelis.” Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology 45.9 (2014): 1453-70.

 

URL: http://jcc.sagepub.com/content/45/9/1453

 

Abstract

The study examined and compared intergenerational differences in parenting styles, attitudes toward child-rearing, and corporal punishment (CP) in three groups of mother–daughter dyads in Israel: immigrants from Ethiopia and from the Former Soviet Union (FSU) and native-born Israelis. Results show that ethnicity, mothers’ parenting styles, and mothers’ attitudes toward CP significantly explain 21% to 26% of the variance in daughters’ parenting styles. However, the results also indicate the differential effect on parenting style of exposure to a culture other than the culture of origin. This is also reflected in the fact that the younger generation, especially among immigrants from Ethiopia, is more affected by the encounter with the host society than is the older generation.