New Book: Green, Organ Transplantation (in Hebrew)

Green, Yossi. Organ Transplantation. Legislation, Ruling and Practice. Tel Aviv: Resing, 2015 (in Hebrew).

 

organtransplant

 

 

After three decades of discussions and disputes in the Knesset and the general public, two laws passed in 2008: the organ transplantation law (2008), and the respiratory brain death law (2008). Both of these laws are supposed to regulate the procedures for organ transplantation, to overcome the ongoing shortage of organs for transplantation and at the same time prevent the development of negative phenomena which are contrary to the values ​​of the State of Israel.

This book focuses on the legal aspect of organ transplant procedure in Israel. It serves as an annotated and clear summary of the legal approach, relevant not only to jurists and lawyers, but also to an audience of “consumers” – i.e. organ donors and their families and patients awaiting transplant surgery and their families. The author analyzes the law and its provisions by each section to allow anyone interested to become familiar with the intricacies of its implications. In addition, each section is supplemented with cumulative legal knowledge, as well as remarks and reservations concerning the feasibility of the law in the future. Moreover, alongside a practical analysis, the author presents a broad picture of the substantive issues, allowing the reader to examine all the considerations taken into account before the legislator formulated the final version of the law.

The subjects discussed in the book include: the prohibition on organ trade, the feasibility of altruistic organ donation, the status of the National Transplant Center and its functions, the power of the assessment committees responsible for the permit of organ donation, the procedures for taking organs from the living and the dead, including the legal validity of that Adi cards and the “in my heart” cards. The priority procedure for patients awaiting a transplant is also examined from a critical standpoint.

New Article: Boas et al, The Impact of the Israeli Transplantation Law on the Profile of Kidney Donors

Boas, H., E. Mor, R. Michowitz, B. Rozen-Zvi, and R. Rahamimov. “The Impact of the Israeli Transplantation Law on the Socio-Demographic Profile of Living Kidney Donors.” American Journal of Transplantation 15.4 (2015): 1076-80.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ajt.13090

 

Abstract

The Israeli transplantation law of 2008 stipulated that organ trading is a criminal offense, and banned the reimbursement of such transplants by insurance companies, thus decreasing dramatically transplant tourism from Israel. We evaluated the law’s impact on the number and the socio-demographic features of 575 consecutive living donors, transplanted in the largest Israeli transplantation center, spanning 5 years prior to 5 years after the law’s implementation. Living kidney donations increased from 3.5 ± 1.5 donations per month in the pre-law period to 6.1 ± 2.4 per month post-law (p < 0.001). This was mainly due to a rise in intra-familial donations from 2.1 ± 1.1 per month to 4.6 ± 2.1 per month (p < 0.001). In unrelated donors we found a significant change in their socio-demographic characteristics: mean age increased from 35.4 ± 7.4 to 39.9 ± 10.2 (p = 0.001), an increase in the proportion of donors with college level or higher education (31.0% to 63.1%; p < 0.001) and donors with white collar occupations (33.3% to 48.3%, p = 0.023). In conclusion, the Israeli legislation that prohibited transplant tourism and organ trading in accordance with Istanbul Declaration, was associated with an increase in local transplantation activity, mainly from related living kidney donors, and a change in the profile of unrelated donors into an older, higher educated, white collar population.