Cite: Flanders, Road Movie: Notes from the Field

Flanders, Elle. “Road Movie: Notes from the Field.” Camera Obscura 27.2 (2012): 165-75.

URL: http://cameraobscura.dukejournals.org/content/27/2_80/165.abstract

Abstract

This piece follows the author’s journey of making a film about the segregated roads in Palestine, and the ways in which queer subjectivity and radical politics inform the work we produce regardless of subject matter. Offering a counter-narrative to the Israeli government’s dissimulation as a democratic and progressive nation in its advancement of queer-rights (commonly referred to as pinkwashing), “Notes from the Field” exposes the realities of occupation and its impact on the lives of Palestinians, including queers and their profound interventions. Through a critique of the impact of neoliberalism on current queer politics, the piece winds its way toward a suturing of queer identity and questions of nation.

Cite: Peled & Navot, Private Incarceration – Towards a Philosophical Critique

Peled, Yoav and Doron Navot. “Private Incarceration – Towards a Philosophical Critique.” Constellations 19.2 (2012): 216-234.

URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-8675.2012.00679.x/abstract

Cite: Davidson and Schejter, Discourses of Israeli DTT Policy

Davidson, Roei and Amit M. Schejter. "’Their Deeds are the Deeds of Zimri; but They Expect a Reward Like Phineas’: Neoliberal and Multicultural Discourses in the Development of Israeli DTT Policy." Communication, Culture & Critique 4,1 (2011): 1-22.

 

URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1753-9137.2010.01089.x/abstract

Abstract

We examine how neoliberal and multicultural discourses were employed in the development of digital terrestrial television (DTT) policy in Israel as a case study of the deployment of media technology in a society that is characterized by deep social cleavages and rapid neoliberalization. We conduct a detailed analysis of official documents published over 6 years, including preparatory work, draft bills, parliamentary committee minutes, parliamentary plenary discussions, and the wording of the law enacted in February 2008. This study highlights how neoliberal multiculturalism operates as rhetoric that champions the cultural and economic rights of minorities, while masking policy stances that negate these rights. We demonstrate how this is linked to the composition of the channels eventually included on the DTT platform.