Bulletin: Religion in Israel

Books:

Articles:

Reviews:

 

94263

New Article: Wagner, Nietzsche’s Visions and Buber’s Israel

Wagner, Karin. “Hugo Kauder’s Unexpressed Philosophical Concept: Schelling’s Transcendence, Nietzsche’s Visions and Buber’s Israel.” Journal of Modern Jewish Studies (early view; online first).
 
URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14725886.2016.1144283
 
Abstract

Hugo Kauder, born in 1888 near Prague, composer, instrumentalist, theoretician and music-philosopher, came to Vienna in 1905, left Austria after the Novemberpogrom 1938 and reached New York via the Netherlands and England in 1940. In 1938 Tel Aviv was also one of his intended havens (parts of Kauder’s estate are kept at the National Library of Israel, Jerusalem). Engaged in the crisis discourse in Vienna’s postwar period of the early 1920s, Kauder drafted his philosophical ideas under the influence of Friedrich Schelling and Friedrich Nietzsche, also speculating on music-teleology, mysticism and cosmology. Corresponding with the German philosopher Rudolf Pannwitz, with the authors Karl Wolfskehl and Erich von Kahler, Kauder expressed his Jewishness – much more as a mindset than an active Jewish identity. Coming from a system of transcendental and natural philosophy combined with Christian ideas, Kauder moved to a more complex syncretism also reflecting on Jewish topics. Kauder did not organize his ideas into a concept, they are, rather, the theoretical framework of his educational books and are widespread in his essays and letters.

 

 

 

New Article: Shoshana, Ethnicity without Ethnicity

Shoshana, Avihu. “Ethnicity without Ethnicity: ‘I’m beyond that story’ State Arrangements, Re-Education and (New) Ethnicity in Israel.” Social Identities (early view; online first).

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1369183X.2016.1166939

 

Abstract

This article examines the connection between state ethnic classifications and the way they are perceived by individuals in everyday life. Using the case of the Boarding School for the Gifted Disadvantaged in Israel which is open to immigrants, an attempt was made to reach an understanding of how individuals who have experienced deliberate state intervention in the ethnic component of their selfhood, experience this intervention years after the (re)construction. The main findings illuminate how boarding school graduates transformed the governmental intervention into a unique ethnic identity for everyday life: ‘ethnicity without ethnicity’. This identity rejects any overt engagement with the ethnic component of the concept of self. This identity even relies on the subject’s constant reminders to himself that ‘he is beyond the ethnic story’ and that meritocratic identity (devoid of ethnic consciousness) is preferable to ascriptive identity. The findings also show that ethnic identity is not necessarily expressed in everyday practices (language, food consumption, music, festivals) but rather in ongoing cognitive engagement of the agent distanced from the available official ethnic classifications. The discussion section tracks the state-organizational sources of this ethnic identity and its relation to the unmarked ethnicity amongst the upper-middle classes.

 

 

 

New Article: Shelleg, Holocaust Imageries in Late Israeli Art Music

Shelleg, Assaf. “Abandoning Representations: Holocaust Imageries in Late Israeli Art Music.” Dapim (early view; online first).

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/23256249.2016.1131021

 

Abstract

Discussing mechanisms of representation in modern Jewish art music in general and post-Holocaust commemoration music in particular, the article examines the dilution of musical signs in Holocaust-related works penned by Israeli composers Noam Sheriff, Ruben Seroussi, and Tzvi Avni. Written within the span of thirteen years, between 1985 and 1998, these works include Sherrif’s (b. 1935) Mechaye Hametim (He Who Revives the Dead, 1985); Seroussi’s (b. 1959) A Victim from Terezin (1995; based on excerpts from Gonda Redlich’s Terezin diary); Avni’s (b. 1927) Se questo è un oumo (1998; a setting of poems by Primo Levi); and Avni’s From There and Then (1994–1998). The compositions under discussion unfold a continuum of aesthetic approaches ranging from postromantic trajectories that stitch musical signs on nationalist teleological constellations (Sheriff), through conscious non-redemptive formulations (Seroussi), to compositional emphases on the migration and translocation of Jewish musics rather than affixed signs of otherness (Avni). The dilution of Jewish musical markers not only attests to the composers’ abandoning of representational apparatuses, but also necessitates a broader look at the dialectical movement of Jewish musics before, during, and after the Holocaust, lest these sounds become objectified or otherwise overshadowed by nationalist constellations.

 

 

 

ToC: Jewish Social Studies 21,1 (2015)

Jewish Social Studies 21.1 (2015)

Table of Contents

 Front Matter

JSS-Front

Dissertation: Hankins | Black Musics, African Lives, and the National Imagination in Modern Israel

Hankins, Sarah Elizabeth. Black Musics, African Lives, and the National Imagination in Modern Israel. PhD Dissertation, Harvard University, 2015.

 
URL: http://dash.harvard.edu/handle/1/17467531

 
Abstract

“Black Musics, African Lives, and the National Imagination in Modern Israel,” explores the forms and functions of African and Afro-diasporic musics amidst heated public debate around ethnic identity and national membership. Focusing on musical-political activity among Ethiopian Israeli citizens, Sudanese and Eritrean refugees, and West African labor migrants in Tel Aviv, I examine how diverse types of musicking, from nightclub DJing and live performance to church services and protest concerts, voice African and Afro-descendent claims to civic status in a fractured urban environment. Grounded in ethnographic participant observation, the dissertation analyzes musical and political activity through the lens of “interpretive modes” that shape contemporary Israel’s national consciousness, and which influence African and Afro-descendant experiences within Israeli society. These include “Israeliyut,” or the valorization of so-called native Israeli cultural forms and histories; “Africani,” an emerging set of aesthetic and social values that integrates African and Afro-descendent subjectivities into existing frameworks of Israeli identity; and “glocali,” or the effort to reconcile local Israeli experience with aspects of globalization.

Tracing “blackness” as an ideological and aesthetic category through five decades of public discourse and popular culture, I examine the disruptions to this category precipitated by Israel’s 21st century encounter with African populations. I find that the dynamics of debate over African presence influence an array of mass-cultural processes, including post-Zionism, conceptions of ethnic “otherness,” and the splintering of Israel’s left into increasingly narrow interest groups. Contributing to the literature on continuity and change within urban-dwelling African diasporas, this dissertation is the first monograph exploring dramatic transformations of Israel’s highly consolidated national culture through in-depth ethnography with migrant groups.

 

 

New Article: Dorchin, Ethnography of Jewish and Arab Rap in Israel

Dorchin, Uri. “Flowing Beyond Sectarian Ethno-politics: Ethnography of Jewish and Arab Rap in Israel.” Ethnopolitics (early view; online first).

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17449057.2015.1041752

 

Abstract

This article addresses the meaning of political music by drawing on the relationships between Jewish and Arab rappers in Israel. However, this article aims to go beyond the concerns of resistance and hegemony that are central to the power-relations paradigm typical of studies of both Israeli society and rap. Instead, it emphasizes how cross references made by rappers transgress social and political oppositions. Based on data gathered from various venues and interviews with performers in the local scene, the author seeks to explain why political music, even in its most scathing guise, should never be taken for a mere ‘musical politics’.

New Book: Katz, Bringing Zion Home. Israel in American Jewish Culture

Katz, Emily Alice. Bringing Zion Home. Israel in American Jewish Culture, 1948-1967. Albany: SUNY Press, 2015.

 

Katz, Bringing Zion Home

 

Bringing Zion Home examines the role of culture in the establishment of the “special relationship” between the United States and Israel in the immediate postwar decades. Many American Jews first encountered Israel through their roles as tastemakers, consumers, and cultural impresarios—that is, by writing and reading about Israel; dancing Israeli folk dances; promoting and purchasing Israeli goods; and presenting Israeli art and music. It was precisely by means of these cultural practices, argues Emily Alice Katz, that American Jews insisted on Israel’s “natural” place in American culture, a phenomenon that continues to shape America’s relationship with Israel today.

Katz shows that American Jews’ promotion and consumption of Israel in the cultural realm was bound up with multiple agendas, including the quest for Jewish authenticity in a postimmigrant milieu and the desire of upwardly mobile Jews to polish their status in American society. And, crucially, as influential cultural and political elites positioned “culture” as both an engine of American dominance and as a purveyor of peace in the Cold War, many of Israel’s American Jewish impresarios proclaimed publicly that cultural patronage of and exchange with Israel advanced America’s interests in the Middle East and helped spread the “American way” in the postwar world. Bringing Zion Home is the first book to shine a light squarely upon the role and importance of Israel in the arts, popular culture, and material culture of postwar America.

Emily Alice Katz teaches history at the University of California, Irvine.

 

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations
Acknowledgments

1. Introduction: Postwar American Jewry Reconsidered

2. Before Exodus: Writing Israel for an American Audience

3. Hora Hootenannies and Yemenite Hoedowns: Israeli Folk Dance in America

4. A Consuming Passion: Israeli Goods in American Jewish Culture

5. Cultural Emissaries and the Culture Explosion: Introducing Israeli Art and Music

Conclusion
Notes
Bibliography
Index

 

Concert: Yaniv Dinur with the AU Orchestra (Nov 20, 2014)

“A Little Night Music” with Yaniv Dinur and the AU Orchestra

Thursday, November 20 – 8:00 PM AU Museum Galleries

 

yanivdinur

The AU Chamber Orchestra will play selections reflecting Professor Dinur’s personal journey from Israel to America.  Featuring Yaniv Dinur, conductor; Brian Prunka, Oud; and Mary Voutsas, Piano.   The AU Museum Store will be open from 7:30-9:30 PM for your holiday shopping pleasure before the concert and during intermission.  Check out the exhibits in the Museum before the concert, including the Washington Sculptor Group’s 30-year anniversary exhibition featuring Israeli artist Dalya Luttwak.  

RSVP requested:  http://www.american.edu/cas/israelstudies/news.rsvp

Event: The Israeli Chamber Project at JTS, October 22, 2014

In Our Community
“The Israeli Chamber Project is that rarest of creatures: a band of world-class soloists that is not a muster of peacocks, but a hive mind in which egos dissolve and players think, breathe, and play as one.” —Time Out New York

The Israeli Chamber Project with Samuel Rhodes
ABOUT THE CONCERT

The artists of the award-winning Israeli Chamber Project are joined together by a common passion for music-making and the musical traditions of their native Israel. Acclaimed in performances around the world, they juxtapose music from the standard classical repertoire with music born in and influenced by Israeli and Jewish culture. Works of Mozart and Brahms bookend this program, which also features the New York premiere of celebrated Israeli composer Jonathan Keren’s Infracta, commissioned by the ICP, as well as Erwin Schulhoff’s energetic, folk-inspired Duo for Violin and Cello. The ensemble is joined by legendary violist Samuel Rhodes, who served as the Juilliard String Quartet’s violist for 44 seasons until his retirement in 2013.

ABOUT THE PERFORMERS

Israeli Chamber Project 
Founded in 2008, the Israeli Chamber Project (ICP) brings together some of today’s most distinguished musicians for chamber music concerts and educational and outreach programs. A dynamic ensemble that features classic and rarely heard chamber masterworks, as well as newly commissioned music from Israeli composers, ICP performs at major concert venues and lesser-known locations where chamber music concerts are rare. It provides educational programs—including master classes and lessons to underprivileged communities—and increases the audience’s understanding of and involvement with music by providing commentary from the stage. Based both in Israel and New York City, the Israeli Chamber Project was named the winner of the 2011 Israeli Ministry of Culture Outstanding Ensemble Award. Among the ensemble’s members are prizewinners at the Tchaikovsky International Competition, Borletti-Buitoni Trust Award, Avery Fisher Career Grant, and Gaspar Cassado Cello Competition.

Tibi Cziger (artistic director, clarinet)
Called an “exciting soloist” by the New York Times, Israeli clarinetist Tibi Cziger has performed in Israel, Korea, Europe, and the United States. He is the artistic director and cofounder of ICP, and has performed in numerous concerts, television and radio broadcasts, and festivals such as Marlboro, Musique en Brionnais, and the Jerusalem International Chamber Music Festival.

Michal Korman (cello)
A Gaspar Cassado and George Enescu International Cello Competitions prize winner, cellist Michal Korman has performed as a soloist with the Israel Philharmonic under Zubin Mehta, Tokyo Philharmonic, Orquesta Sinfónica Nacional of Peru, and Juilliard Chamber Orchestra, and appeared in solo and chamber music recitals at Carnegie and Alice Tully Halls, as well as Israel’s major venues. Ms. Korman is a cofounding member of ICP, with which she tours annually.

Assaff Weisman (executive director, piano)
Pianist Assaff Weisman’s performances have taken him to some of the major venues of Europe, the Middle East, and the Americas. These include Prague’s Rudolfinum, Beethovenhalle Bonn, the Hague’s Dr. Anton Philips Hall, and New York City’s Lincoln Center. A first-prize winner in the 2006 Iowa International Piano Competition, he has appeared as soloist with the Sioux City Symphony, American Chamber Orchestra, and Connecticut Valley Chamber Orchestra.

Carmit Zori (violin)
Israeli violinist Carmit Zori came to the United States at 15 to study with Ivan Galamian, Jaime Laredo, and Arnold Steinhardt at Philadelphia’s Curtis Institute of Music. Today, she is the recipient of the Levintritt Foundation and Pro Musicis International awards, and the top prize in the Walter W. Naumburg International Violin Competition.

with special guest artist

Samuel Rhodes (viola)
Samuel Rhodes was the violist of the celebrated Juilliard String Quartet for 44 seasons, and has been a member of The Juilliard School’s viola faculty for 46 years; he is currently department chair. Mr. Rhodes has participated in the Marlboro Festival since 1960, and is a faculty member of the Tanglewood Music Center.

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JTS Presents: The Israeli Chamber Project with Samuel Rhodes, an Evening of Chamber Music from The Juilliard School is the culmination of The Juilliard School’s fifth daylong residency of educational and inspirational performances and master classes at JTS, and the first of the 2014–2015 academic year. Through examination of Jewish culture and community within the arts, the residency—including this evening performance which is open to the public—incorporates music of composers of Jewish heritage, as well as compositions that highlight Jewish themes and traditions.

“These residencies and concerts by The Juilliard School are a significant step forward in our effort to make the creative arts a vital presence in the life and culture of The Jewish Theological Seminary. The JTS Arts Initiative, launched by Chancellor Arnold M. Eisen with the energetic and able support of our distinguished Arts Advisory Board, is already causing a stir with exciting new ventures such as this one with Juilliard—and there is much more to come.” —Dr. Alan Cooper, Elaine Ravich Professor of Jewish Studies and Provost, JTS

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The Juilliard School established this country’s standard for performing arts education in music (1905), adding dance (1951) and, as a founding member of Lincoln Center in 1968, drama. Currently more than 800 young artists from 44 states (plus Washington DC) and 46 foreign countries attend Juilliard.

The Jewish Theological Seminary serves North American Jewry by educating intellectual and spiritual leaders for Conservative Judaism and the vital religious center, training rabbis, cantors, scholars, educators, communal professionals, and lay activists who are inspired by our vision of Torah and dedicated to assisting in its realization.

Newsletter: Berkeley Institute for Jewish Law and Israel Studies, Fall 2014

Click here to see original.

FALL HIGHLIGHTS

TUESDAY, OCT. 21

The Future of the
Peace Process 
 
Abraham Sofaer
,

Hoover Institution; Former Legal Advisor, State Dept.

Janine Zacharia,
Stanford University; Former Jerusalem Bureau Chief,
Washington Post

5 pm | Bancroft Hotel

THURSDAY, NOV. 6
ROBBINS LECTURE IN JEWISH LAW
Maimonides on Mourning:
Jewish Law and Emotion

Moshe Halbertal,
Hebrew University/NYU

5 pm | Bancroft Hotel


PUBLIC EVENTS CALENDAR
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 10
Canada and the Holocaust:
The Untold Story
Irving Abella
University of Ottawa

12 noon | Goldberg Room, Berkeley Law

Click here to RSVP

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 10
Gourmet Ghettos:
Modern Food Rituals 

Exhibit Opening Event
5 pm | The Magnes

THURSDAY, NOV. 13

Piyyut: Hebrew Poetry
and World Music
Prof. Robert Alter & Yair Harel, Schusterman Visiting Israeli Artist
Co-hosted by The Magnes
7 pm | The Magnes,

_____________________

  

 

 

 

 

 

FALL 2014
Berkeley Institute Newsletter

KB Photo
Prof. Ken Bamberger

A Word from the Faculty Director:
The Berkeley Institute is experiencing a growth spurt. Its role as a hub for student and faculty engagement has expanded exponentially, as has the national presence of its Program on Israel Studies and its Program on Jewish Law, Thought, and Identity. Our talented staff has doubled, with the addition of Andrei Dubinsky, Program Administrator, and Leah Wagner-Edelstein, Director of Institutional Advancement. As the fall term begins, I’d like to share a taste of the past year’s accomplishments, as well as some of what’s planned for this year – ten visiting faculty and scholars, seven new courses, programs on the future of the peace process and Israeli music and culture, the Annual Robbins Lecture in Jewish Law, and two speaker series for students. And that’s just the beginning. I look forward to seeing you throughout the year.

Four Professors – Yudof, Davidoff Solomon, Lawton, and Zilberman – Join the Institute’s Faculty
The Institute welcomes four new members to its Faculty Advisory Committee: Mark Yudof, Steven Davidoff Solomon, Leora Lawton, and David Zilberman. Two hail from law: Mark Yudof, former UC President, is a leading scholar of education law, while Davidoff Solomon studies international issues of law and finance.  Lawton, a demographer, heads the Berkeley Population Center and has extensive experience in Israel. Zilberman is a leading environmental economist working on water resources in the Middle East. Their addition to our faculty contributes greatly to the Institute’s programmatic scope, its resources for student advising, and its academic breadth.

Welcoming Ten Visiting Faculty and Scholars

In addition to new faculty affiliates, the Institute has brought ten visiting faculty and scholars to spend the 2014-2015 year at Berkeley. Four Israeli visiting faculty will teach courses in History, Sociology, Environmental Policy, and Legal Studies. Six additional scholars –

American and Israeli – will conduct research and contribute to the Institute’s ongoing programs.

Bidding Farewell to our 2013-2014 Visiting Professors:
As we welcome our new visiting faculty, we also say goodbye and thank you to our 2013-2014 visitors, Lisa and Douglas Goldman Visiting Israeli Professor Sharon Aronson-Lehavi and The Rosalinde and Arthur Gilbert Visiting Professor Amnon Lehavi. Their courses greatly enriched Jewish and Israel Studies offerings on campus – engaging with topics in contemporary Israeli art and culture and Israeli law and society – and touched the lives of the many students they taught and advised and faculty with whom they collaborated. We are grateful for their many contributions in and outside the classroom during their year at Cal.

Expanding the Student Focus: Student Fellows, Programs, and Support
Ambassador Dennis Ross meeting with
Berkeley students

The Berkeley Institute has over the past year magnified its resources and programming for students. Highlights include student programs with Ambassador Dennis Ross and Israeli writer Ari Shavit, and the facilitation of a successful student-initiated course, “Paradigms of Jewish Identity.” The Institute is expanding these programs this year and offering two lecture series for students. “Different Angles on the Middle East Conflict” will host discussions with campus and community experts. “Religion, Law, and State in Israel” will bring distinguished scholars and public intellectuals to Berkeley for student-focused talks. These programs will supplement the seven Israel and Jewish Studies courses supported this year by the Institute.

Undergraduate Fellows
Tiana (left) and Mallory (right)

Spring 2014 semester also saw the launch of the Institute’s Undergraduate Fellows program. Our Fellows serve as ambassadors of the Institute to the rest of the student body, promoting student engagement with the Institute’s existing courses, programs, and activities, and working with others in the student body to develop student-focused programming.
Examples of Fellows’ involvement include:

Students conduct staged theater reading
  • Staffing and promoting the Institute’s programs
  • Coordinating student events including a panel discussion on Israeli Start-Ups, the multicultural celebration “From India to Israel,” and a staged theater reading for Yom Hashoah
  • Planning an Israeli film series for Fall 2014

2013-2014 in Review: A Year of Landmark Programming:

The Institute achieved new programming heights in 2013-2014, attracting collaborations from across the Cal campus.

Professor Michael Walzer at Berkeley

Fall 2013: In the fall, the Institute hosted Fania Oz-Salzberger, Professor of History at the University of Haifa, who spoke about her new book, Jews and Words, written with her father, novelist Amoz Oz. Later in the semester, leading American political thinker Michael Walzer gave the Fifth Annual Robbins Collection Lecture: “What We Can Learn from the Jewish Political Tradition?” Fall public programming concluded with Ambassador Dennis Ross speaking before a packed audience about the prospects for peace in the Middle East, before meeting a group of Berkeley students for an in-depth dinner discussion.

Dean Joan Bieder and Ari Shavit in conversation

Spring 2014: Spring semester highlights included a series, co-hosted by the Graduate School of Journalism, on “Covering Israel.” Associate Journalism Dean Joan Bieder moderated discussions with three contemporary journalists: award-winning author and Ha’aretz columnist Ari Shavit; Ha’aretz Editor-in-Chief Aluf Benn; and Janine Zacharia, former Jerusalem Bureau Chief for the Washington Post.

In March, the Institute hosted an international conference titled “Israeli and Palestinian Waterways: History, Politics, and Technology of Water and Environment in the Middle East,” drawing seven institutional partners from across campus and beyond. Spring programs concluded during the week of Yom HaShoah with a staged reading of the play by Robert Skloot If the Whole Body Dies: Raphael Lemkin and the Treaty against Genocide.

Many of the Institute’s public programs, including the lectures by Ambassador Ross and Michael Walzer, the Journalism series, and the international conference, were recorded and are available for viewing online.

Thank you to our supporters!

Contact Information

Faculty Director

Kenneth A. Bamberger
Professor of Law
Executive Director
Rebecca Golbert
Director of Institutional Advancement
Leah Wagner-Edelstein, MA
Program Administrator
Andrei Dubinsky

For more information check our website at http://www.law.berkeley.edu/JLILES.htm

Follow us on FacebookFollow us on facebook
or contact Andrei Dubinsky at adubinsky@law.berkeley.edu

UC Berkeley School of Law | 2850 Telegraph Ave., Suite 500 | Berkeley | CA | 94705

ToC: Israel Studies 19.2 (2014)

[ToC from Project Muse; content also available at JStor: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2979/israelstudies.19.issue-2]

Israel Studies

Volume 19, Number 2, Summer 2014

Table of Contents

Special Issue: Zionism in the 21st Century

Editors: Ilan Troen and Donna Robinson Divine

 

Introduction: (Special issue, Israel Studies, 19.2)

pp. v-xi

Ilan Troen, Donna Robinson Divine

Articles: Zionist Theory

Cultural Zionism Today

pp. 1-14

Allan Arkush

Bi-Nationalist Visions for the Construction and Dissolution of the State of Israel

pp. 15-34

Rachel Fish

Culture: Literature and Music

Nostalgic Soundscapes: The Future of Israel’s Sonic Past

pp. 35-50

Edwin Seroussi

Cultural Orientations and Dilemmas

Remember? Forget? What to Remember? What to Forget?

pp. 51-69

Tuvia Friling

The Kibbutz in Immigration Narratives of Bourgeois Iraqi and Polish Jews Who Immigrated to Israel in the 1950s

pp. 70-93

Aziza Khazzoom

Politics and Law

Zionism and the Politics of Authenticity

pp. 94-110

Donna Robinson Divine

Law in Light of Zionism: A Comparative View

pp. 111-132

Suzanne Last Stone

Economics and Land

Some Perspectives on the Israeli Economy: Stocktaking and Looking Ahead

pp. 133-161

Jacob Metzer

Competing Concepts of Land in Eretz Israel

pp. 162-186

Ilan Troen, Shay Rabineau

Israel’s Relationship with Its Neighbors and the Palestinian Arab Citizens

The Arab Minority in Israel: Reconsidering the “1948 Paradigm”

pp. 187-217

Elie Rekhess

Israel’s Place in a Changing Regional Order (1948–2013)

pp. 218-238

Asher Susser

Religion and Society

Messianism and Politics: The Ideological Transformation of Religious Zionism

pp. 239-263

Eliezer Don-Yehiya

The Ambivalent Haredi Jew

pp. 264-293

Yoel Finkelman

Contributors

pp. 294-296

New Article: Hankins, Multidimensional Israeliness and Tel Aviv’s Tachanah Merkazit

Hankins, Sarah. “Multidimensional Israeliness and Tel Aviv’s Tachanah Merkazit: Hearing Culture in a Polyphonic Transit Hub.” City & Society 25.3 (2013): 282-303.

 

URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ciso.12023/abstract

 

Abstract

Israel’s heated public debate over the socio-political implications of increasing demographic diversity plays out with special prominence in Tel Aviv, home to large minority citizen populations and a destination for foreign workers and refugees from Asia and Africa. The city’s New Central Bus Station, or tachanah merkazit, is a transit hub and commercial complex in which multiple ethnic groups enact aesthetic and cultural dimensions of Israeli urban and national identity in flux. This paper presents a sensory ethnography of the tachanah: sonic and musical expressions of “local” and “global” Israeliness are analyzed against a backdrop of near-constant motion and transit. The somatic and ideological dimensions of movement enable Jewish Israelis, minority citizens and foreigners to assimilate sounds of culture within the tachanah at deeply-felt, personal levels. The tachanah’s sonic activity is inherently political, having the potential to impact collective identity and civic reality in Tel Aviv and across Israel

Cite: McDonald, Imaginaries of Exile and Emergence in Israeli Jewish and Palestinian Hip Hop

McDonald, David A. “Imaginaries of Exile and Emergence in Israeli Jewish and Palestinian Hip Hop.” TDR: The Drama Review 57.3 (2013): 69-87.

 

URL:  http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/the_drama_review/v057/57.3.mcdonald.htm

 

Extract

Anat Halachmi’s acclaimed 2003 documentary, Channels of Rage, begins with a furious argument between two prominent Israeli hip hop groups: DAM, a Palestinian-Israeli crew from Lyd comprised of Tamer Nafar, Suheil Nafar, and Mahmoud Jrere; and TACT, a collection of Jewish-Israeli rappers led by Subliminal (Kobi Shimoni) and Shadow (Yoav Eliasi). Meeting in a dark alley in Tel Aviv, the groups nearly come to blows over recent comments made by the two leaders, Tamer Nafar and Shimoni. Once collaborative and nurturing, the relationship between the two young rappers quickly dissolved as each began to embody contrasting political ideologies within the ongoing al-Aqsa intifada. Coming to terms with the violence on the streets of Tel Aviv and Jenin, both artists retreated from their once supportive relationship, based in a mutual love of hip hop, into the rigid, uncompromising nationalisms of Israel and Palestine.

 

Reviews: Kanaaneh and Nusair, eds. Displaced at Home

Kanaaneh, Rhoda Ann and Isis Nusair, eds. Displaced at Home. Ethnicity and Gender among Palestinians in Israel. Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 2010.

cover

Reviews

  • Sa’ar, Amalia. “Review.” Review of Middle East Studies 45.1 (2011): 113-115.
  • Bachal, Lauren, et al. “Review.” Contemporary Sociology 40.5 (2011): 639-40.
  • Gluck, Sherna Berger. “New Directions in Palestinian Oral History.” Oral History Review 39.1 (2012): 100-111.
  • Vivier, Elmé. “Review.” Journal of International Women’s Studies 13.3 (2012): 203-207.
  • Arar, Khalid. “Review.” British Journal of Middle Eastern Studies 40.2 (2013): 227-30.

.

Cite: Schwarz, Arab Sounds in Contested Space: Life Quality, Cultural Hierarchies and National Silencing

Schwarz, Ori. “Arab Sounds in a Contested Space: Life Quality, Cultural Hierarchies and National Silencing.” Ethnic and Racial Studies (published online before print publication).

 

URL: www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01419870.2013.786109

 

Abstract

Sounds and sonic norms and regimes characterize both spaces/territories and individual bodies. This article explores the meanings of and reactions to Arab sounds in Israel – political struggles over muezzins, stereotypical representations of Israeli Palestinians as loud, and so on – in order to offer general insights into the role of the sonic (both actual sounds and their discursive representations) in the new ‘cultural’ racism, in the everyday ethnicized experience of one’s body, and in shaping relations between ethnic and national groups.

New Publication: Harris and Omer-Sherman, eds., Narratives of Dissent

Harris, Rachel S. and Ranen Omer-Sherman. Narratives of Dissent. War in Contemporary Israeli Arts and Culture. Detroit : Wayne State University Press, 2012.

 

dissent

 

 

URL: http://wsupress.wayne.edu/books/detail/narratives-dissent

The year 1978 marked Israel’s entry into Lebanon, which led to the long-term military occupation of non-sovereign territory and the long, costly war in Lebanon. In the years that followed, many Israelis found themselves alienated from the idea that their country used force only when there was no alternative, and Israeli society eventually underwent a dramatic change in attitude toward militarization and the infallibility of the IDF (Israel Defense Forces). In Narratives of Dissent: War in Contemporary Israeli Arts and Culture editors Rachel S. Harris and Ranen Omer-Sherman collect nineteen essays that examine the impact of this cultural shift on Israeli visual art, music, literature, poetry, film, theatre, public broadcasting, and commemoration practices after 1978.

Divided into three thematic sections-Private and Public Spaces of Commemoration and Mourning, Poetry and Prose, and Cinema and Stage-this collection presents an exciting diversity of experiences, cultural interests, and disciplinary perspectives. From the earliest wartime writings of S. Yizhar to the global phenomenon of films such as Beaufort, Waltz with Bashir, and Lebanon, the Israeli artist’s imaginative and critical engagement with war and occupation has been informed by the catalysts of mourning, pain, and loss, often accompanied by a biting sense of irony. This book highlights many of the aesthetic narratives that have wielded the most profound impact on Israeli culture in the present day.

These works address both incremental and radical changes in individual and collective consciousness that have spread through Israeli culture in response to the persistent affliction of war. No other such volume exists in Hebrew or English. Students and teachers of Israeli studies will appreciate Narratives of Dissent.

 

 

Table of Contents (from Library of Congress)

Introduction: zionism and the culture of dissent / Ranen Omer-Sherman — Private and public spaces of commemoration and mourning — "Music of peace" at a time of war : Middle Eastern music amid the second intifada / Galeet Dardashti — Privatizing commemoration : the helicopter disaster monument and the absent state / Michael Feige — "Cyclic interruptions" : popular music on Israeli radio in times of emergency / Danny Kaplan — Consuming nostalgia : greetings cards and soldier-citizens / Noa Roei — The photographic memory of Asad Azi / Tal Ben Zvi — "We shall remember them all" : the culture of online mourning and commemoration of fallen soldiers in Israel / Liav Sade-Beck — Poetry and prose — Bereavement and breakdown : war and failed motherhood in Raya Harnik’s work / Esther Raizen — From IDF to .pdf : war poetry in the Israeli digital age / Adriana X. Jacobs — "Unveiling injustice" : Dahlia Ravikovitch’s poetry of witness / Ilana Szobel — War at home : literary engagements with the Israeli political crisis in two novels by Gabriela Avigur-Rotem / Shiri Goren — Forcing the end : apocalyptic Israeli fiction, 1971-2009 / Adam Rovner — Oh, my land, my birthplace : Lebanon war and intifada in Israeli fiction and poetry / Glenda Abramson — Vexing resistance, complicating occupation : a contrapuntal reading of Sahar Khalifeh’s wild thorns and David Grossman’s The smile of the lamb / Philip Metres — Gender, war, and zionist mythogynies : feminist trends in Israeli scholarship / Esther Fuchs — Cinema and stage — Representations of war in Israeli drama and theater / Dan Urian — From national heroes to postnational witnesses : a reconstruction of Israeli soldiers’ cinematic narratives as witnesses of history / Yael Munk — A woman’s war : The Gulf War and popular women’s culture in Israel / Rachel S. Harris — Beaufort the book, beaufort the film : Israeli militarism under attack / Yaron Peleg — Shifting manhood: masculinity and the Lebanon war in Beaufort and waltz with Bashir / Philip Hollander — List of contributors — Index.

Conference Program: Zionism in the 21st Century, February 17-18 2013, Brandeis University

“Zionism in the Twenty-First Century”

Brandeis University, February 2013

Israel Studies and Jewish Studies in America

 

February 17-18 (President’s Day Weekend)

Brandeis University, Waltham, MA

 

Announcing an upcoming conference, "Zionism in the Twenty-First Century:

Contemporary Perspectives from and about Israel"

 

An academic conference on Sunday, February 17 and Monday, February 18, 2013

at Brandeis University in Waltham, Massachusetts.

The conference is sponsored by the Schusterman Center for Israel Studies.

 

 For more information please contact scis@brandeis.edu or call 781736-2154

 

Conference Chairs:

S. Ilan Troen, Stoll Family Chair in Israel Studies and Director, Schusterman Center, Brandeis University

Donna Robinson Divine, Morningstar Family Professor in Jewish Studies and

Professor of Government, Smith College

 

Conference Overview:

The conference will explore what Zionism has meant and might continue

to mean for the development of Israel’s highly sophisticated

and multicultural society.  Academics have done a great deal to understand

Zionist ideas and policies in their early historical context. We have paid

less attention, however, to how Zionism has continued to influence Israel

through more recent years of military dangers, economic upheaval, and

social and cultural transformations. Less still have we explored the

potential role of Zionism in the future of Israel. The leading scholars in

the field will discuss their views regarding the continuing relevance and

role of Zionism.

 

Conference Speakers:

 

*Keynote Address: Anita Shapira* *– *(Tel-Aviv University, Ruben Merenfeld

Professor of the Study of Zionism and head of the Weizmann Institute for

the Study of Zionism)

 

*Zionist Theory*

 

*Allan Arkush- *(SUNY, Binghamton) “Cultural Zionism Today and Tomorrow”

 

*Rachel Fish- *(Brandeis University) “Visions for the Construction of the

State of Israel”

 

*Chair and Commentator: Eugene Sheppard *(Brandeis University)

 

*Culture: Literature and Music*

 

*Alan Mintz*- (Jewish Theological Seminary) “Jewish Literature in Israel

and Israeli Literature in America: Some Reflections”

 

*Edwin Seroussi*- (Hebrew University) “Zionist Soundscapes: The Sonic Past

of the Israeli Nation and Its Future”

 

Chair and Commentator:* Rachel Rojanski *(Brown University)

 

*Cultural Orientations and Dilemmas*

 

*Tuvia Friling*- (Ben-Gurion University) “The Evolution of Holocaust Memory”

 

*Aziza Khazoom*- (Indiana University and Hebrew University) “Internal

Ethnic Relations and Orientation of Israeli Culture”

 

Chair and Commentator:* Maoz Azaryahu *(Tel Aviv University)

 

*Politics and Law*

 

*Donna Robinson Divine*- (Smith College) “Zionism and the New Politics of

Authenticity in Israel”

 

*Suzanne Last Stone*- (Yeshiva University and Shalem Center) “Legal

Discourse – Law and Human Rights”

 

Chair and Commentator:* Pnina Lahav *(Boston University)

 

*Economics and Land*

 

*Kobi (Jacob) Metzer-* (Hebrew University) “Economy and Society in Israel:

Past Experience, Current Issues, and Future Prospects”

 

*Ilan Troen*- (Brandeis University) “Competing Concepts of Land in Eretz

Israel”

 

Chair and Commentator:* Alan Dowty *(Notre Dame University)

 

*Israel’s Relationship with its Neighbors and the Palestinian Arab Citizens*

 

*Elie Rekhess-* (Northwestern University)“Jews and Arabs in Israel:

Reconsidering the 1948 Paradigm”

 

*Asher Susser*- (Tel Aviv University) “Israel’s Place in the Middle East”

 

Chair and Commentator:* Shai Feldman *(Brandeis University)

 

*Religion and Society*

 

*Eliezer Don-Yehiya*- (Bar-Ilan University) “The Political Transformation

of Religious Zionism”

 

*Yoel Finkelman*- (Bar-Ilan University) “The Ambivalent Ultra-Orthodox Jew”

 

Chair and Commentator:* Yehudah Mirsky *(Brandeis University)

 

ToC: Israel Studies 17,3 (2012)

URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2979/israelstudies.17.issue-3

Cite: St John, Vibe Tribes, Sampledelic Outlaws and Israeli Psytrance

St John, Graham. “Freak Media: Vibe Tribes, Sampledelic Outlaws and Israeli Psytrance.” Continuum 26.3 (2012): 437-447.

 

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10304312.2012.665839

 

Abstract

As an electronic dance music movement, for over 20 years, psytrance (psychedelic trance) has been a context by which sonic, visual, pharmacological and virtual media have facilitated the expression of interwoven narratives, experimental modes of performance, and the experience of intense sociality in scenes the world-over. A key theme adopted within this movement is the ‘tribe’, the discourse around which is multivalent, though here I focus on the transgressive dimensions of psytrance to which one is attached as a member of a tribe apart. The article provides detailed examination of the outlaw figure and sensibility in psytrance, illustrating how cultural producers – e.g. DJ-producers, label owners, scene writers, event management – facilitate the party vibe, and a distinct ‘psychedelic. or ‘freak’ identity via this trope. Among the chief icons of performance, prestige and tribalism sampled within psytrance music and culture, the outlaw is adapted from popular cultural sources (especially cinema) and redeployed as a means of dissolving and performing difference. The exploration of the outlaw conceit in what I call nano-media amplified by the producers of psytrance music illustrates how a psychedelic fiction is generated. Specific, although not exclusive, attention is given to Israeli producers, which offers comment on psytrance in Israel where this music is considered popular.