ToC: Israel Studies Review 30.2 (2015)

Israel Studies Review 30.2 (2015)

Editors’ Note

Editors’ Note
pp. v-vi(2)

 

Articles

Does Israel Have a Navel? Anthony Smith and Zionism
pp. 28-49(22)
Author: Berent, Moshe

 

Book Reviews

Book Reviews
pp. 130-155(26)

New Article: Molad, Zionism: An Unfinished Revolution?

Molad, Yoni. “Zionism: An Unfinished Revolution?” Arena 44 (2015): 178-190.

 

URL: http://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=512951196182719;res=IELAPA

 

Abstract

In a recent and fascinating study published in Israel, the history and achievements of Israeli – or Hebrew – modernist art, music, architecture and literature have been documented and discussed under the title ‘How Do You Say Modernism in Hebrew?’ Clearly, the authors and editors of the collection felt that, despite the rich modernist artistic heritage of modern Hebrew culture, the status of modernism in Israeli culture is still underappreciated or misunderstood and its rehabilitation is an important intellectual task. However, the editors did not explicitly raise any political consideration in their book. This essay seeks to address this question and argues that the modernist history of the Zionist movement needs to be re-examined in order to rehabilitate the universalist aspects of the project of Jewish nationalism that lie dormant in its intellectual heritage. This paper is not intended as a definitive statement and does not offer a detailed empirical or historical analysis but rather raises some theoretical and more generally philosophical questions based on what I take to be the ideological heritage of Zionist thought. I am aware that some of the following reflections may fall on deaf ears or even provoke hostile reactions due to the sensitivity of the topic, so I will try to be as clear as possible.

 

 

New Book: Ram; The Return of Martin Buber (in Hebrew)

רם, אורי. שובו של מרטין בובר. המחשבה הלאומית והחברתית בישראל מבובר עד הבובריאנים החדשים. תל אביב: רסלינג, 2015.

buber

Martin Buber (1878-1965) was the first chair of the first Department of Sociology at the first university in Israel – but who remembers this today? This book discusses the history of ideas of national and social thought, and of sociology in Israel, through the question of Buber’s changing status: what was his initial place in sociology? Why did he disappear from the sociological canon? And why has interest in his works resurged in recent years?

This significant book by Uri Ram presents a new look at Buber’s philosophy and offers a critical reading of it. While Buber was a prominent figure of the pre-state peace movements (“Brit Shalom” and “Ihud”), he was also a German thinker of his time, who utterly rejected modernism and fully embraced the conservative-right visions of traditional Gemeinschaft Community, the nationalist Volk culture, and the Congregation of the Faithful.

The Department of Sociology was founded in the academic year of 1947/8 and Buber was appointed as its chair. His sociology was somewhat consistent with the spirit of the pre-state Jewish community, but not the spirit of statehood that followed independence. In 1950, the leadership of Sociology shifted to Buber’s student Eisenstadt, who designed the discipline in the coming decades in the spirit of American modernization. Buber’s figure became marginal for many years. However, since the 1990s, Buber’s status has enjoyed a revival, against the backdrop of the crisis of secular nationalism, alongside the rise of postmodern and postcolonial approaches in intellectual discourse. New sociological studies was inspired by Buber is defined in this book as “neo-Buberian”, and the book raises questions as to whether this trend promotes a civil and democratic culture or rather empowers the national-religious culture in contemporary Israel.

 

New Article: Harris, The Flourishing of Hebrew Modernism

Harris, Rachel S. “Cosmopolitan, Diasporic and Transnational: The Flourishing of Hebrew Modernism.” Modernism / Modernity 21.1 (2014): 361-68.

 

URL: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/modernism-modernity/v021/21.1.harris.html

 

Abstract

Review article of:

  • Literary Passports: The Making of Modernist Hebrew Fiction in Europe. Shachar M. Pinsker. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2010. Pp. xiv + . $60.00 (cloth).
  • Diasporic Modernisms: Hebrew & Yiddish Literature in the Twentieth Century. Allison Schachter. New York: Oxford University Press, 2012. Pp. x + . $35.00 (cloth).
  • Reconfiguring Surrealism in Modern Hebrew Literature: Menashe Levin, Yitzhak Oren and Yitzhak Orpaz. Giulia Miller. London: Vallentine Mitchell Publishers, 2013. Pp. $84.95 (cloth).

Excerpt

All three scholars demonstrate that Hebrew modernist fiction, no matter where it was being written, shared some common literary and cultural ideals. The writers “advocated the departure from a socially and historically grounded mimesis towards a portrayal of the ‘hidden’ realities of human existence, to engage with universal (and modernist) concerns such as sexuality, religiosity, existential angst and related themes.” Experimentation in Hebrew literature was not simply tied up with Zionism and the creation of a national homeland, but also reflected a broader and more complex history that valued the power of language to articulate a modern, cosmopolitan Jewish experience. By contextualizing Hebrew modernist writing within European, American and Native American cultural history, and tracing the development of modernism in Israel, wherein it was vastly neglected, all three works raise new questions about the role of place, thought and language in the life of the movement.

ToC: Jewish Social Studies 18,3 (2012): Special issue; History and Responsibility: Hebrew Literature Facing 1948

Volume 18, Number 3, Spring/Summer 2012

History and Responsibility: Hebrew Literature Facing 1948, edited by Amir Eshel, Hannan Hever, and Vered Karti Shemtov

Table of Contents

Articles

 Introduction        pp. 1-9

        Amir Eshel, Hannan Hever, Vered Karti Shemtov

 

Abba Kovner: The Ritual Function of His Battle Missives    

pp. 99-119

        Michal Arbell

 

Unraveling the Wars of 1948    

pp. 120-135

        Uri Cohen
 
 

pp. 136-152

        Sidra DeKoven Ezrahi
 

 

 Sovereignty and Melancholia: Israeli Poetry after 1948    

pp. 164-179

        Michael Gluzman

                      Contributors    

pp. 225-227

 

                      In Forthcoming Issues    

p. 228