New Article: Meiri, Sexual Violence as Represented in Israeli Holocaust-Related Cinema

Meiri, Sandra. “Visual Responses: Women’s Experience of Sexual Violence as Represented in Israeli Holocaust-Related Cinema.” European Journal of Women’s Studies 22.4 (2015): 443-56.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1350506815606439

 

Abstract

This article explores the function of Israeli narrative films’ persistent, albeit marginal, portrayal of women as victims of sexual violence during the Holocaust. While the marginalization of such characters may be attributed to the difficulty of representing sexually-related trauma/post-trauma, their portrayal attests both to the ubiquity of sexually-related crimes in the Holocaust and to its aftermath: namely, the persistence of women’s trauma. The first of the two waves of ‘retro films’ examined here evinces the importance of the visual, cinematic representation of women’s trauma. Its main function is to legitimize its disclosure through cinematic aesthetic/artistic mediation, for sexual violence was a crime committed against helpless victims. The second wave includes films made from the point of view of ‘the second generation’, and explores the topic further by dealing with the transmission of post-traumatic symptoms of women’s trauma to the second generation.

 

 

New Article: Bitan et al, Delusional Themes in Germany and Israel During the Twentieth Century

Bitan, Dana Tzur, Maria Christina Müller, Shlomit Keren, Israel Krieger, and Lars Hornuf. “War Within, War Outside: A Psychoanalytic Account of Delusional Themes in Germany and Israel During the Twentieth Century.” Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association 63.3 (2015): NP1-NP7.

 

URL: https://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003065115594186

 

Excerpt
Psychoanalysis, through its myriad developments, has embraced the individual intrapsychic world as its main protagonist. Even so, from its bedrock, it has not ignored the contextual fields of culture, society, political forces, and historical events. Freud (1912–1913) saw similarities between the formation of civilization and individual psychic development, while laying the groundwork for later ideas such as the collective unconscious, tying together unconscious memories of historical events, personal trajectories, and the unseen discourse of social groups (Jung 1959). Psychoanalysts like Bion and Segal have drawn various analogies between the dynamic processes of the individual and those of the group (Bion 1946; Segal 1995). In line with these postulates, Bain coined the term socio-analysis (1999) to denote the adaptation of psychoanalytic concepts as underlying processes of social and cultural dynamics.

Within these mutual dynamics, some have pointed to the role of madness in the maintenance of social order. Foucault (1961) suggested that Cartesian dualist thinking, in addition to its use in differentiating and defining, created a hierarchy: privileging one category over the the other for purposes of domination, order, and control. Thus, the rational and “sane” society can maintain its positive characteristics, while binding its irrational, less accepted parts to the insane locked away in asylums. To put it differently, society uses projection and the splitting-off of madness as defense mechanisms aimed at maintaining the civilized order. Thus, the psychotic plays a unique role as the bearer of primitive and ominous elements.

 

 

New Article: Moran et al, Why Do Mental Health Consumers Who Receive Rehabilitation Services, Are Not Using Them?

Moran, Galia S., Yael Baruch, Faissal Azaiza, and Max Lachman. “Why Do Mental Health Consumers Who Receive Rehabilitation Services, Are Not Using Them? A Qualitative Investigation of Users’ Perspectives in Israel.” Community Mental Health Journal (early view; online first).

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10597-015-9905-1

 

Abstract

A recovery-oriented approach to mental health involves creating person centered services and enhancing engagement in psychiatric rehabilitation. Israel’s Rehabilitation in the Community of Persons with Mental Disabilities Law is a progressive initiative that shifted the locus of psychiatric care to community care supporting individualized rehabilitation and recovery-oriented processes. Yet over a quarter of applicants do not implement their assigned rehabilitation plans and services. This qualitative study investigated reasons and experiences related to lack of utilization from applicants’ perspectives. Fifteen service users were interviewed face to face in semi-structured interviews analyzed using Grounded theory approach. Seven categories emerged: (1) Lack of knowledge and orientation; (2) Negative perceptions about rehabilitation services (3) Lack of active participation/shared decision-making; (4) Not feeling heard by the committee; (5) Lack of congruence between participants’ goals and committee’s final decisions; (6) Lack of escorting professionals’ competencies; and (7) Family members’ influence. The results are interpreted at the structural and human process levels. Suggestions are provided for augmenting systemic procedures and human interactions processes.