Bulletin: Higher Education and Student Life

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New Article: Bisharat & Bowirrat, Challenges Faced by Arab Women Interested in Becoming Physicians

Bisharat, Bishara, and Abdalla Bowirrat. “Challenges Faced by Arab Women Who Are Interested in Becoming Physicians.” Israel Journal of Health Policy Research 4:30 (2015): 3 pp.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13584-015-0029-4

 

Abstract

Understanding the underlying reasons for the under-representation of Arab women within the health care system in Israel is crucial for creating future strategies for intervention, in order to minimize the gaps in the health care system and thus improve the medical services and health status.

Our commentary tries to shed light on the underrepresentation and the marginalization of the Arab women in society in general and in the medical field in specific.

 

 

New Article: Schoenbaum et al, Policy Issues Related to Educating the Future Israeli Medical Workforce

Schoenbaum, Stephen C., Peter Crome, Raymond H. Curry, Elliot S. Gershon, Shimon M. Glick, David R. Katz, Ora Paltiel, and Jo Shapiro. “Policy Issues Related to Educating the Future Israeli Medical Workforce: An International Perspective.” Israel Journal of Health Policy Research (early view; online first).

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/110.1186/s13584-015-0030-y

 

Abstract

A 2014 external review of medical schools in Israel identified several issues of importance to the nation’s health. This paper focuses on three inter-related policy-relevant topics: planning the physician and healthcare workforce to meet the needs of Israel’s population in the 21st century; enhancing the coordination and efficiency of medical education across the continuum of education and training; and the financing of medical education. All three involve both education and health care delivery.

The physician workforce is aging and will need to be replenished. Several physician specialties have been in short supply, and some are being addressed through incentive programs. Israel’s needs for primary care clinicians are increasing due to growth and aging of the population and to the increasing prevalence of chronic conditions at all ages. Attention to the structure and content of both undergraduate and graduate medical education and to aligning incentives will be required to address current and projected workforce shortage areas. Effective workforce planning depends upon data that can inform the development of appropriate policies and on recognition of the time lag between developing such policies and seeing the results of their implementation.

The preclinical and clinical phases of Israeli undergraduate medical education (medical school), the mandatory rotating internship (stáge), and graduate medical education (residency) are conducted as separate “silos” and not well coordinated. The content of basic science education should be relevant to clinical medicine and research. It should stimulate inquiry, scholarship, and lifelong learning. Clinical exposures should begin early and be as hands-on as possible. Medical students and residents should acquire specific competencies. With an increasing shift of medical care from hospitals to ambulatory settings, development of ambulatory teachers and learning environments is increasingly important. Objectives such as these will require development of new policies.

Undergraduate medical education (UME) in Israel is financed primarily through universities, and they receive funds through VATAT, an education-related entity. The integration of basic science and clinical education, development of earlier, more hands-on clinical experiences, and increased ambulatory and community-based medical education will demand new funding and operating partnerships between the universities and the health care delivery system. Additional financing policies will be needed to ensure the appropriate infrastructure and support for both educators and learners.

If Israel develops collaborations between various government agencies such as the Ministries of Education, Health, and Finance, the universities, hospitals, and the sick funds (HMOs), it should be able to address successfully the challenges of the 21st century for the health professions and meet its population’s needs.

 

 

New Article: Bronfman et al, Assigning Israeli Medical Graduates to Internships

Bronfman, Slava, Avinatan Hassidim, Arnon Afek, AssafRomm,Rony Shreberk, Ayal Hassidim, and Anda Massler. “Assigning Israeli Medical Graduates to Internships.” Israel Journal of Health Policy Research 4.1 (2015)

 
URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/2045-4015-4-6 [PDF]

 

Abstract
Background: Physicians in Israel are required to do an internship in an accredited hospital upon completion of the medical studies,and prior to receiving the medical license. For most students, the assignment is determined by a lottery, which takes into consideration the preferences of these students.
Objectives: We propose a novel way to perform this lottery, in which (on average)a larger number of students gets one of their top choices. We report about implementing this method in the 2014 Internship Lottery in Israel.
Methods: The new method is based on calculating a tentative lottery, in which each student has some probability of getting to each hospital. Then a computer program “trades” between the students, where trade is performed only if it is beneficial to both sides. This trade creates surplus, which translates to more students getting one of their top choices.
Results: The average student improved his place by 0.91 seats.
Conclusions: The new method can improve the welfare of medical graduates, by giving them more probability to get to one of their top choices. It can be applied in internship markets in other countries as well.

 

 

New Article: Popper-Giveon & Keshet, Choice of a Medical Career Among the Arab Minority in Israel

Popper-Giveon, Ariela, and Yael Keshet. “‘It’s Every Family’s Dream’: Choice of a Medical Career Among the Arab Minority in Israel.” Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health (early view; online first).

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10903-015-0252-7

 

Abstract
Application to medical studies and the choice of medicine as a career are influenced by many factors, some internal (academic ability, intellectual curiosity, interests) and some external (parental pressure, peer pressure, teacher and school expectations). Ethnicity plays a role in motivational orientation and belonging to an ethnic minority group may influence both internal and external motives and priorities in choosing medicine as a career. In this article, we present a qualitative study of the motives that impel Arab physicians in Israel to choose a medical career. As a theoretical framework, we apply self-determination theory (SDT) (Ryan and Deci in Am Psychol 55:68–78, 2000), consisting of three principal categories situated along a continuum: Amotivation, extrinsic motivation and intrinsic motivation. We show that extrinsic motivation is dominant among Arab physicians in Israel, demonstrating specifically the unique political context and cultural characteristics of Arab society in Israel. These findings, and the attention to the unique motivations of people from different ethnic minority groups who choose medical career, may increase the number of physicians from minority groups, a step known to decrease health gaps in multi-cultural contexts.