New Publication: Russell, Hanneman, & Getz, eds. The Renewal of the Kibbutz

Russell, Raymond, Robert Hanneman, and Shlomo Getz, eds. The Renewal of the Kibbutz. From Reform to Transformation. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 2013.

kibbutz

Description

We think of the kibbutz as a place for communal living and working. Members work, reside, and eat together, and share income “from each according to ability, to each according to need.” But in the late 1980s the kibbutzim decided that they needed to change. Reforms—moderate at first—were put in place. Members could work outside of the organization, but wages went to the collective. Apartments could be expanded, but housing remained kibbutz-owned. In 1995, change accelerated. Kibbutzim began to pay salaries based on the market value of a member’s work. As a result of such changes, the “renewed” kibbutz emerged. By 2010, 75 percent of Israel’s 248 non-religious kibbutzim fit into this new category.

This book explores the waves of reforms since 1990. Looking through the lens of organizational theories that predict how open or closed a group will be to change, the authors find that less successful kibbutzim were most receptive to reform, and reforms then spread through imitation from the economically weaker kibbutzim to the strong.

Author / Editor Bio

RAYMOND RUSSELL is a professor of sociology at the University of California, Riverside. He is the author of Sharing Ownership in the Workplace and Utopia in Zion: The Israeli Experience with Worker Cooperatives.
ROBERT HANNEMAN is a professor of sociology at the University of California, Riverside. He has authored four books, including State Intervention in Medical Care: Consequences for Britain, France, Sweden, and the United States.

SHLOMO GETZ is a research associate at the Institute for Kibbutz Research at the University of Haifa and a senior lecturer at Emek Yezreel College in Israel. He has authored or coauthored numerous publications, including The Kibbutz in an Era of Changes and The Kibbutz: The Risk of Enduring (both written in Hebrew).

Table Of Contents

List of Tables
Acknowledgments

Introduction: Perspectives on Change in the Kibbutzim
1. Development of the Kibbutzim
2. From Crisis to Reform, 1985-2001
3. Consideration and Adoption of Innovations, 1990-2001
4. Transformation of the Kibbutzim, 1995-2011
5. From Transformation to Renewal

Appendix: Data Sources and Statistical Analytics
References
Index

 

 

 

ToC: Journal of Israeli History 32,1 (2013)

 

 

Special Issue: House as Home in Israeli Culture

Articles

Introduction

Orit Rozin
pages 1-5

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  • DOI:10.1080/13531042.2013.768026

 

Separate spheres, intertwined spheres: Home, work, and family among Jewish women business owners in the Yishuv

Talia Pfefferman
pages 7-28

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  • DOI:10.1080/13531042.2013.768028

 

Just ring twice: Law and society under the rent control regime in Israel, 1948–1954

Maya Mark
pages 29-50

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  • DOI:10.1080/13531042.2013.768029

 

The evolution of the inner courtyard in Israel: A reflection of the relationship between the Western modernist hegemony and the Mediterranean environment

Hadas Shadar
pages 51-74

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  • DOI:10.1080/13531042.2013.768031

 

The P6 Group and critical landscape photography in Israel

Jochai Rosen
pages 75-85

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  • DOI:10.1080/13531042.2013.768033

 

Visions of identity: Pictures of rabbis in Haredi (ultra-Orthodox) private homes in Israel

Nissim Leon
pages 87-108

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  • DOI:10.1080/13531042.2013.768035

 

Soft power: The meaning of home for Gush Emunim settlers

Michael Feige
pages 109-126

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  • DOI:10.1080/13531042.2013.768041

 

Heading home: The domestication of Israeli children’s literature in the 1960s as reflected in Am Oved’s Shafan ha-sofer series

Yael Darr
pages 127-139

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  • DOI:10.1080/13531042.2013.768042

House and home: A semantic stroll through metaphors and symbols

Tamar Sovran
pages 141-156

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  • DOI:10.1080/13531042.2013.768044

Cite: Yaron et al., Analysis of Israel’s Policy Towards African Asylum-Seekers

Yaron, Hadas, Nurit Hashimshony-Yaffe and John Campbell. “‘Infiltrators’ or Refugees? An Analysis of Israel’s Policy Towards African Asylum-Seekers.” International Migration (Early View: Online Version of Record published before inclusion in an issue).

 

URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/imig.12070/abstract

 

Abstract

This article adopts a genealogical approach in examining Israeli immigration policy by focusing on the situation confronting African asylum seekers who have been forced back into Egypt, detained and deported but who have not had their asylum claims properly assessed. Based on immigration policies formulated at the time of Israeli independence, whose principle objective was to secure a Jewish majority state, we argue that Israel’s treatment of African asylum seekers as ‘infiltrators’/economic migrants stems from an insistence on maintaining immigration as a sovereign issue formally isolated from other policy domains. Such an approach is not only in violation of Israel’s commitment to the Refugee Convention, it directly contributes to policies which are ineffective and unduly harsh.

CFP: Israel between International Relations and Domestic Policies, London, 15-16 Sep 2013

Click here for details and e-mails

 

European Association of Israel Studies (EAIS)

2nd Annual Conference on Israel Studies

Israel between International Relations and Domestic Policies

SOAS, University of London

Sunday, 15 September – Monday 16 September 2013

 

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

This one day conference will build on our successful academic conference in September 2012 at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Munich which was attended by scholars and students of many European countries, from Russia to Portugal.

The aim of the conference is to bring together scholars from a variety of disciplines who are engaged in research in any aspect of Israel studies – Politics, Literature, History, Economics, Language, Culture, Music and Art.

It will continue to build on areas previously investigated in the academic literature and also open up new fields of intellectual enquiry.

The organisers welcome all proposals including suggestions for panels which are pertinent to Israel Studies.

The EAIS will offer a limited number of travel grants  for the London conference for  doctoral students and junior faculty.

Please send an abstract of 200-250 words together with biographical background of about 50-100 words before 13 May 2013 to: Mita Vaghji on *****@soas.ac.uk All proposals are subject to a review process. The conference will be held in English.

All presenters must be fully paid-up members of the EAIS. For membership details, see http://tinyurl.com/673qdhn For details of the EAIS Charter, see http://tinyurl.com/6ggsu7o Further information and registration details will be made available in due course on our website.

Mita Vaghji

SOAS, University of London

Cite: Abu-Laban and Bakan, Canada, the Israel/Palestine Conflict, and the Surveillance of Public Discourse

Abu-Laban, Yasmeen & Abigail B. Bakan. “After 9/11: Canada, the Israel/Palestine Conflict, and the Surveillance of Public Discourse.”  Canadian Journal of Law and Society 27.3 (2012): 319-339.

 

URL: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/canadian_journal_of_law_and_society/v027/27.3.abu-laban.html

 

Abstract

Since September 11, 2001, a growing body of scholarship has traced the intensification of surveillance in countries of the industrialized West. However, less attention has been paid to analyzing the impact of surveillance of discourse, particularly public discourse normally considered a hallmark of liberal democratic freedoms of speech and association. In this article we consider the case of Canadian public discourse and illustrate how surveillance has intensified in relation to freedom of expression regarding the Israel/Palestine conflict. Drawing on accounts from media, government, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs), we highlight notable moments in the Canadian state’s deepening ties with Israel, tracing direct intervention in public discourse concerning the Israel/Palestine conflict. The regulation of public discourse on the part of state and non-state actors in Canada is aimed to influence universities, civil society events, access to meetings and events with international speakers, and even the expressions of NGOs abroad. In addition, the regulation of public discourse has impacted the securitization of borders, immigration, and surveillance in light of an ascribed "terrorist threat." This has resulted in a new and distinct pattern of surveillance—or watching—of words, loyalty, and organizations, according to their presumed political views concerning the Israel/Palestine conflict.

Cite: Marom and Yacobi, Cultural Diversity Policy in Tel Aviv

Marom, Nathan & Haim Yacobi. “‘Culture Capital for All’? Cultural Diversity Policy in Tel Aviv and its Limits.” Mediterranean Politics 18.1 (2013): 60-77.

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13629395.2012.745709

Abstract

This article critically analyses cultural diversity policy in Tel Aviv–Jaffa in relation to non-Jewish labour migrant communities and to Palestinian citizens of Israel residing in Jaffa. It focuses on recent incorporation of cultural diversity into city policy in its ‘City Vision’ and ‘Global City’ initiatives and in three specific areas (festivities, libraries and museum of city history). The article argues that despite the introduction and initial institutionalization of cultural diversity in Tel Aviv, there are unresolved contradictions when city policies encounter the ethnocratic boundaries set by Israel’s policies.

Conference: Partitions. Towards Transnational History of 20th c. Territorial Separatism, Stanford, April 18-19, 2013

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ToC: Israel Affairs 19.1 (2013)

Israel Affairs, Vol. 19, No. 1, 01 Jan 2013 is now available on Taylor & Francis Online.
Special Issue: The Israeli Palestinians Revisited
This new issue contains the following articles:

Preface
Preface
Alexander Bligh & Efraim Karsh
Pages: 1-1
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.748284
Original Articles
Israel’s Arabs: deprived or radicalized?
Efraim Karsh
Pages: 2-20
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.748285
Political trends in the Israeli Arab population and its vote in parliamentary elections
Alexander Bligh
Pages: 21-50
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.748286
Israel’s policy towards its Arab minority, 1947–1950
Yoav Gelber
Pages: 51-81
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.748287
The Israeli Arab extended family and the inner courtyard: a historical portrait
Kobi Peled
Pages: 82-98
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.748288
The Israeli establishment and the Israeli Arabs during the First Intifada
Alexander Bligh
Pages: 99-120
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.748289
Israel’s Arab leadership in the decade attending the October 2000 events
Gadi Hitman
Pages: 121-138
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.748290
Israel and the Northern Branch of the Islamic Movement
Eyal Pascovich
Pages: 139-153
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.748291
Another flew over the digital divide: internet usage in the Arab-Palestinian sector in Israel during municipal election campaigns, 2008
Azi Lev-On
Pages: 154-169
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.748292
Israel’s 2003 Plan for the Unification of Local Authorities
Rami Zeedan
Pages: 170-190
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.748293
Police officers’ acceptance of community policing strategy in Israel and their attitudes towards the Arab minority
Amikam Harpaz & Sergio Herzog
Pages: 191-213
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.748294
Israel’s other Palestinian problem: the Future Vision Documents and the demands of the Palestinian minority in Israel
Dov Waxman
Pages: 214-229
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.748295
Erratum
De-legitimization of Israel in Palestinian Authority Schoolbooks
Arnon Groiss
Pages: 230-230
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.717412
Miscellany
Corrigendum
Pages: 231-231
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.778533

Cite: Abu-Rabia-Queder & Weiner-Levy, Agency of Palestinian Women in Israel

Abu-Rabia-Queder, Sarab and Naomi Weiner-Levy. “Between Local and Foreign Structures: Exploring the Agency of Palestinian Women in Israel.” Social Politics 20.1 (2013): 88-108.

 

URL: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/social_politics/v020/20.1.abu-rabia-queder.html

 

Abstract

Stemming from the literature that examines the importance of structure as a means that produces agency, this article aims to analyze Palestinian women’s agency in Israel as negotiation with particular conflicting structures. While Middle Eastern women’s agency is structured within Arab religious and cultural resources, Palestinian women’s agency in Israel, We claim, is not only structured by Arab cultural and religious resources, but is also structured by Jewish-Israeli spatial-cultural resources. This paper analyses two sources from which Palestinian women in Israel derive agency and examines the interplay between them: (a) Palestinian cultural resources and (b) Israeli-Jewish cultural-spatial resources. By analyzing this agency and coping resources, we seek to conceptualize a more extensive theoretical model that draws on existing Middle Eastern feminist literature concerning Arab women, with attention to the unique realities of Palestinian women’s life in Israel and the varied structuring resources available to them.

Cite: Benhabib, Ethics without Normativity and Politics without Historicity On Judith Butler’s Parting Ways

Benhabib, Seyla. “Ethics without Normativity and Politics without Historicity On Judith Butler’s Parting Ways. Jewishness and the Critique of Zionism.” Constellations 20.1 (2013): 150-63.

 

URL: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/bpl/cons/2013/00000020/00000001/art00013

Fellowships: Foundation for Defense of Democracies Summer program (June 15-26, 2013)

After 9/11, numerous colleges and universities added terrorism and homeland security courses to their curricula. Many professors and graduate students who taught these courses complained of having insufficient access to the top practitioners or the latest research in the field. In response, FDD created the Academic Fellowship program for university professors entitled “Defending Democracy, Defeating Terrorism.”

The program features an intensive, 10-day course on terrorism and the threat it poses to democratic societies. Using Israel as a case study, professors are given access to top researchers and officials who provide cutting-edge information about the terrorist threats to democracies worldwide. The goal of the program is to offer information to teaching professionals about the latest trends in terrorists’ ideologies, motives, and operations, and how democracies can fight them.

The course of study occurs both in the classroom at Tel Aviv University and in the field with lectures by academics, diplomats, military and intelligence officials, and politicians from Israel, Jordan, India and the United States. It also features visits to military bases, border zones and other security installations to learn the practical side of deterring terrorist attacks.

This year’s program runs June 15 – 26, 2013 (travel inclusive). All expenses are paid by FDD. 
Deadline for applications is April 5, 2013
.

Eligible professors must:

  • Have a full-time affiliation with a U.S. or Canadian university;
  • Serve in a teaching capacity, preferably in the fields of international affairs, history, law, political science or criminal justice;
  • Have an ongoing involvement in student activities.

Accepted professors must be willing to:

  • Fully participate in the 10-day program in Israel; and
  • Assist in the recruitment of future candidates for the Academic Fellowship Program.

Interested individuals may send inquiries to dana@defenddemocracy.org.

– See more at: http://www.defenddemocracy.org/project/campus-programs/#sthash.vhaY7mPS.dpuf

Reviews: Raz, The Bride and the Dowry

Reviews of Raz, Avi. The Bride and the Dowry. Israel, Jordan, and the Palestinians in the Aftermath of the June 1967 War. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2012.

 

 

 

Cite: Khoury et al, Identity Formation among Palestinian Arab College Students

L. Khoury, S. Da’Na, & I. Abu-Saad. “The Dynamics of Negation: Identity Formation among Palestinian Arab College Students inside the Green Line.” Social Identities (published first online).

 

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13504630.2012.753343

 

Abstract

How does granting certificates of ‘business clean of Arab workers’ to owners of shops, stores, and Jewish businesses who prove they are not employing Arab workers shape identity? Identity development involves making sense of, and coming to terms with, the social world one inhabits, recognizing choices and making decisions within contexts, and finding a sense of unity within one’s self while claiming a place in the world. Since there is no objective, ahistoric, universal trans-cultural identity, views of identity must be historically and culturally situated. This paper explores identity issues among members of the Palestinian Arab minority in Israel. While there is a body of literature exploring this subject, we will offer a different perspective by contextualizing the political and economic contexts that form an essential foundation for understanding identity formation among this minority group. We argue that, as a genre of settler colonialism, ‘pure settlement colonies’ involve the conquering not only of land, but of labor as well, excluding the natives from the economy. Such an exclusion from the economy is significant for its cultural, social, and ideological consequences, and therefore is especially significant in identity formation discussed in the paper. We briefly review existing approaches to the study of identity among Palestinian Arabs in Israel, and illustrate our theoretical contextual framework. Finally, we present and discuss findings from a new study of identity among Palestinian Arab college students in Israel through the lens of this framework.

Jobs: Professor of Israel Studies at Northeastern University

Northeastern University invites nominations and applications for a specialist in Israel Studies to be appointed at the rank of professor, associate professor, or assistant professor beginning Fall 2013. The successful candidate will be an outstanding researcher and teacher whose work makes a central disciplinary contribution in the social sciences or history, as well as to Israel and Middle East Studies. The field of specialization is open, and the College of Social Sciences and Humanities is particularly interested in enhancing strengths in international relations, political economy, or international security. The appointment will be in one or more of the College for Social Sciences and Humanities’ departments or schools and may reach into its International Affairs Program.

Qualifications: A doctoral degree by the start date is required.

Additional Information: Applicants should submit a letter of interest, including a statement on teaching, a CV, a statement of current and future research plans, a writing sample of no more than fifty pages, and contact information for three referees or a dossier service. To apply visit the College of Social Sciences and Humanities website at: http://www.northeastern.edu/cssh/ and click on the Faculty Positions button. Please address inquiries about the position to Mitchell Orenstein, Chair of the Israel Studies Search Committee, m.orenstein@neu.edu.

Review of applications will begin February 22, 2013, but the search will remain open until the position is filled.

https://www.h-net.org/jobs/job_display.php?id=46285

Cite: Okun and Kagya, Fertility Change among Post-1989 Immigrants to Israel from the Former Soviet Union

 

Okun, Barbara S. Shlomit Kagya. “Fertility Change among Post-1989 Immigrants to Israel from the Former Soviet Union.” International Migration Review 46.4 (2012): 792–827.

 

URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/imre.12001/abstract

 

 

Abstract

Research on the evolution of immigrant fertility patterns has focused on the expected reduction in fertility among immigrants from high fertility, less developed countries who arrive in relatively low-fertility developed societies. The current research considers a different context in which immigrants from the low-fertility Former Soviet Union arrive in a relatively high-fertility setting in Israel. This research context allows us to test various theories of immigrant fertility, which cannot normally be distinguished empirically. Results from Cox multivariate regressions of parity-specific progression do not support assimilation theory, which would predict an increase in fertility following migration, in this context. We interpret the very low fertility rates of the FSU immigrants in Israel, relative to all relevant comparison groups, in terms of the economic uncertainty and hardship experienced during a difficult transition period by immigrants who have high aspirations for social mobility in their destination society.

CFP: Israel in Time and Space, Graduate Student Conference, May 12 2013, Yeshiva U

Israel in Time and Space

An Interdisciplinary Graduate Student Conference in Israel Studies

Sunday, May 12, 2013

Yeshiva University, New York City

The Yeshiva University Center for Israel Studies and the Bernard Revel Graduate School of Jewish Studies invite graduate students to join us for a day of learning, community building and professional growth.  The conference will explore Israel from a variety of disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives.   We imagine a broad range of papers, spanning from antiquity through the contemporary era that examine Israel as a place, as a people (or, peoples) and as an idea. Potential topics include but are not limited to: Israel and the diasporas, visual and literary representations of Israel, minorities in Israel, Israel in collective memory, and Israel in comparative perspectives.  Ideas for complete panels are also most welcome.

Yeshiva University faculty from such areas as literature, visual studies, sociology, and Jewish studies will participate in the discussions of this student conference.  The keynote speaker will be announced shortly.

Small amounts of travel support may be available to participants beyond our region, and  we are prepared to arrange home hospitality for participants traveling to the conference.  Please send abstracts to Israel.studies@yu.edu by January 20, 2013, with notification by February 20.  All are welcome!

For further information about the YU Center for israel Studies, visit yu.edu/cis

Cite: Federbush and Muys, Israel and Water: Global Economic Growth and Diplomatic Relations

Federbush, Marjorie S. and Jerome C. Muys. “Israel and Water-(What’s Next for the) ‘Turn around Nation’: How Israel’s Leadership in Advanced Water Technologies Can Enhance Global Economic Growth and Diplomatic Relations.” American Foreign Policy Interests 34.6 (2012): 309-21.

 

URL: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/routledg/uafp/2012/00000034/00000006/art00004

 

Abstract

In less than a decade, Israel has turned around from a perennially water-stressed society, facing serious challenges from climate change, drought, and depletion of water resources, to a technologically savvy innovator of advanced water technologies and management techniques. Having developed the systems, strategies, and technologies to successfully address its own water shortages, Israel now has moved aggressively to engage with other countries as they struggle with their own water deficits. Not only are developing economies seeking access to Israel’s technological know-how in the areas of water technology and management, but policy makers and the business community in developed countries have also taken note. In short, Israel has become a model of economic growth under adverse circumstances. In the process, Israel is increasingly welcomed as a member of the community of nations because of its efforts to promote technology transfer and offer humanitarian assistance to countries facing similar problems. By reaching out to the international community on water-related issues, Israel is creating mechanisms for both global economic growth and diplomatic gains.

Cite: Razi, Treating Children in the Psycho-Hygiene Clinic in Mandate Tel Aviv

Razi, Tammy. “Immigration and its Discontents: Treating Children in the Psycho-Hygiene Clinic in Mandate Tel Aviv.” Journal of Modern Jewish Studies 11.3 (2012): 339-356.

 

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14725886.2012.722765

 

Abstract

During the 1930s and 1940s hundreds of children were diagnosed in Tel Aviv’s Psycho-Hygiene Clinic for Children as suffering mainly from organic retardation or neurosis. Those diagnosed as retarded or “educationally impaired” were sent either to special education institutions or to vocational schools and, in severe cases, to closed institutions. The children diagnosed as neurotic were usually treated individually at the clinic or in private clinics by mental health specialists and remained with their families. In most cases those diagnosed as retarded were children of Mizrahi origin whilst the children diagnosed as suffering from neurosis were of Ashkenazi origin. This paper argues that the diagnosis of so many children as problematic, as well as the relationship between their diagnosis and their ethnic origin, embodies two basic trends in yishuv society, especially prominent during the British Mandate: the labelling of the Mizrahim in general, and Mizrahi children in particular, as culturally and mentally inferior; and a high degree of intervention on the part of mental health specialists. The involvement of psychiatrists, psychoanalysts and specialists in fields such as mental hygiene and Psycho-Hygiene created a pathologization of social and economic problems, and by doing so obscured the harsh realities of immigration.

Cite: Ben-Dror, Armistice Talks between Israel and Jordan

Ben-Dror, Elad. “The Armistice Talks between Israel and Jordan, 1949: The View from Rhodes.” Middle Eastern Studies 48.6 (2012): 879-902.

 

URL: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/routledg/mes/2012/00000048/00000006/art00003

 

Abstract

The article examines the armistice talks between Israel and Jordan (March-April 1949) from the perspective of the UN mediator, Ralph Bunche, who coordinated them. The period described was stormy and complex: at its start, Israel took control of the southern Negev. Later, the two countries conducted formal talks in Rhodes, under Bunche’s watchful eye, in parallel to informal negotiations, without UN involvement, in Jordan. The article, based to a large extent on Bunche’s unpublished diary, explains why Bunche, who maintained rigorous control of all of the other armistice talks, behaved differently in this case, giving his post factum seal of approval to the Israeli takeover of the southern Negev and allowing Israel to pressure Abdullah to hand over the Triangle. The thesis is that Bunche, who could have put an end to the talks by resigning, or drawn the US into the crisis (as he did in the other rounds of negotiations), recognized the complexity of the relations between Israel and Abdullah and chose to act in a way that would prevent a new eruption of hostilities. In effect he was protecting Abdullah, who would have been likely to lose the West Bank to Israel in another round of fighting.

Cite: Cohen, Negotiation of Second-Generation Citizenship in the Israeli Diaspora

Cohen, Nir. “State, Migrants, and the Negotiation of Second-Generation Citizenship in the Israeli Diaspora.” Diaspora 16.1-2 (2012): 133-158.

URL: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/diaspora_a_journal_of_transnational_studies/v016/16.1-2.cohen.html

Abstract

Using second-generation Israeli migrants in the United States as a case study, this article explores one unusual site in which the politics of diasporic citizenship unfolds. It examines the North American chapter of the Israeli Scouts (Tzofim Tzabar) as an arena of negotiation between representatives of the sending state apparatus and migrants over the meaning (and practices) of citizenship outside national territory. This quotidian space is important to migrants’ contestation with the state concerning their claims for a form of membership that is neither territorial nor contingent upon the fulfillment of traditional civic duties (e.g., military service). Challenging the state-supported model of republicanism, in which presence in territory and the fulfillment of a predetermined set of civic duties are preconditions for citizenship, Israeli migrants advocate instead an arrangement based on a strong cultural identity and a revised set of diaspora-based material practices of support.