New Article: Vyas et al, Differences in Travel Behavior Across Population Sectors in Jerusalem

Vyas, Gaurav, Christina Bernardo, Peter Vovsha, Danny Givon, Yehoshua Birotker, Eitan Bluer, and Amir Mossek. “Differences in Travel Behavior Across Population Sectors in Jerusalem, Israel.” Transportation Research Record 2495(2016).

 

URL: http://trrjournalonline.trb.org/doi/abs/10.3141/2495-07

 

Abstract

The population of Jerusalem, Israel, can be divided into three distinct ethnic sectors: secular Jewish, ultra-Orthodox Jewish, and Arab. Not only do these population sectors tend to inhabit and work in different areas of the city, but they each have unique household structures, activity patterns, mobility tendencies, and, ultimately, travel behavior. These substantial variations in behavior, largely driven by differences in culture and lifestyle that are not captured by other personal characteristics, are essential to representing travel behavior in the Jerusalem travel model. In this paper, sector differences were traced through the activity-based travel demand model framework by using the 2010 Jerusalem Household Travel Survey. Significant variations in behavior were seen both in direct relation to the population sector and in interactions with other socioeconomic and demographic characteristics such as income and gender. This is the first known travel demand model in practice to incorporate ethnic differences so extensively in its application.

 

 

 

Cite: Smith, Hotel Design in British Mandate Palestine

Smith, Daniella Ohad. "Hotel Design in British Mandate Palestine: Modernism and the Zionist Vision ." Journal of Israeli History 29,1 (2010): 99-123.

Abstract

From the early 1920s through the 1930s, an important yet forgotten avant-garde architectural phenomenon developed in the Zionist community of British Mandate Palestine. In cities and resort regions across the country, several dozen modernist hotels were built for a new type of visitor: the Zionist tourist. Often the most architecturally significant structures in their locales and designed by leading local architects educated in some of Europe’s most progressive schools, these hotels were conceived along ideological lines and represented a synthesis of social requirements, cutting-edge aesthetics, and utopian national ideals. They responded to a complex mixture of sentiments, including European standards of modern comfort and the longing to remake Palestine, the historical homeland of the Jewish people, for a newly liberated, progressive nation. This article focuses on Jerusalem’s most ambitious modernist hotel, the Eden Hotel, to evaluate how the architecture of tourism became a political and aesthetic tool in the promotion of Zionist Palestine.

URL: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=all~content=a919915811

Keywords: Zionist national style; Palestine tourism; Eden Hotel; King David Hotel; Palace Hotel; Alexander Baerwald; Julius Berger; Josef Frank; Gustave-Adolphe Hufschmid; Alexander Koch; Leopold Krakauer; Abraham Lifschitz; Julius Posener; Yohanan Ratner; Emil Vogt; Werner Joseph Wittkower, British Mandate, Israel: Tourism from, Israel: Architecture, Hotel Industry

Cite: Rozin, Israel and the Right to Travel Abroad

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Rozin, Orit. "Israel and the Right to Travel Abroad, 1948–1961." Israel Studies 15,1 (2010): 147-176.

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Abstract

Today, no one questions that criminals, minors, or those seeking to shirk their civic duties may be restricted or even barred from leaving their respective countries. However, during the 1950s, several democratic countries, including Israel, restricted foreign travel by their citizens on other grounds. This article examines the right of departure policies of Israel in comparison with three models—Soviet, British, and American—which served Israeli policy makers as criteria in this regard. The policy promulgated by a country sheds light on its character, its society, and its perception of citizenship. The article not only describes the right to travel abroad as exercised in Israel, but also opens a window onto the conceptual world of those who set such policy.

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URL: http://inscribe.iupress.org/doi/abs/10.2979/ISR.2010.15.1.147

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Keywords: Freedom of Movement, Israel: Law, Israel: Tourism from, Emigration from Israel, History, Ideology, Israel: Economy

Reviews: Jackie Feldman, Above the Death Pits, beneath the Flag

Feldman, Jackie. Above the Death Pits, beneath the Flag: Youth Voyages to Poland and the Performance of Israeli National Identity. New York and Oxford: Berghahn Books, 2008.

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Reviews: Neima Barzel. Journal of Israeli History 28,2 (2009): 237-239.