New Article: Lachover, Signs of Change in Media Representation of Women in Israeli Politics

Lachover, Einat. “Signs of Change in Media Representation of Women in Israeli Politics: Leading and Peripheral Women Contenders.” Journalism (early view; online first).

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1464884915610991

Abstract

The study seeks to examine gender portrayal of Israeli women politicians, and specifically that of candidates for Israel’s parliament on televised news and in print in the elections of 2013. The study is based on an interpretive analysis of all news items wherein the women candidates are mentioned during the month preceding the elections. This study joins recent studies that point to a change in how women politicians are portrayed in the media. Leading contenders succeed in influencing their coverage, and commensurately usually enjoy nonstereotypically gendered portrayal. Moreover, they occasionally seek to make use of hegemonic cultural norms to benefit what they perceive as structuring their positive gendered portrayal. In contrast, the coverage of peripheral contenders suffers from traditional patterns of sidelining. It emerges that peripheral contenders who gain relatively high exposure are portrayed as exceptional based either on their extraordinary other-ness or on the newsworthiness of their campaigns.

 

 

 

New Book: Lavie, from HaBurganim to In Treatment (in Hebrew)

Lavie, Noa. From HaBurganim to . Tel Aviv: Resling, 2015 (in Hebrew).

 

Lavie

 

 

Against the flood of a global and local television genre considered “inferior” – “reality” TV – there are growing public, official, and scholarly voices who distinguish between purely commercial television and quality, or even artistic, television. The quality discourse, which originated in the United States, revolves mainly around serialized drama shows, which as a television genre is even a competitor to the cinema in its artistic innovation.

Israeli television is heavily influenced by this global quality discourse. Moreover, during the 1990s Israeli television was revolutionized with the privatization of the television market in Israel and the establishment of commercial TV channels and cable and satellite channels. This revolution enabled, in parallel with the institutionalization of the global quality discourse, the production of original Israeli TV drama series immeasurably higher than during the sole reign of the IBA. Accordingly, this book explores how the serialized television drama became a “quality” television genre which is treated as a work of art in every respect.

This book does not deny the possibility that there is such thing as “high art,” or television productions that bears artistic marks; but Noa Lavie’s sociological spotlight seeks to illumine the struggles and the social and organizational causes that defined, beginning in the 1990s and down to the first decade of the 2000s, drama series such as “The Bourgeois” or “In Treatment”, along with other series, as high-quality and artistic television. This is achieved through an analysis of interviews with prominent creators of television drama in Israel, analysis of TV reviews published in major newspapers, and an account of the institutional-organizational field and the technological, regulatory, and other changes it underwent in the early 1990s.

 

Dr. Noa Lavi is the head of the political communication division and a lecturer in the School of Government and Society at Tel Aviv-Yaffo Academic College.

 

 

 

New Article: Lavie & Dhoest, Quality Television in the Making

Lavie, Noa, and Alexander Dhoest. “‘Quality Television’ in the Making: The Cases of Flanders and Israel.” Poetics (early view; online first).

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.poetic.2015.08.006

 

Abstract

This article discusses the properties of ‘quality television’ as constructed within the field of television production. It does so by analyzing the discourse of television creators and critics in two countries, Israel and Flanders, taking a theoretical approach based in part on Bourdieusian theory. Most academic work about ‘quality television’ concentrates on Anglo-American television drama series. In this paper we offer a different perspective by focusing on two small but prosperous television markets outside of the Anglo-American world. Our findings suggest that the quality discourse in both countries contains autonomous-artistic alongside heteronomous-capitalist ideological elements, apparently under the influence of the Anglo-American discourse of quality. Our findings also suggest that both ideological elements contribute to the cultural legitimation of the television drama series in both countries, though the capitalist discourse plays a more evident role among creators than among critics. Finally, we also discuss the differences between the Flemish and the Israeli discourses of ‘quality television.’

 

 

New Article: Hino, Lessons from Israeli Consumers’ Adoption of Innovative TV Viewing

Hino, Hayiel. “TV Today, Mobile TV Tomorrow? Extrapolating Lessons from Israeli Consumers’ Adoption of Innovative TV Viewing Technology.” International Journal on Media Management (early view; online first).

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14241277.2015.1030748

 

Abstract

The present study aims to analyze consumers’ adoption and use of mobile devices as a mobile TV platform that is replacing the traditional TV. Moreover, the study attempts to promote understanding of users’ behavior by employing a new research approach dealing with the acceptance of innovative technology. For this purpose, the study applies a Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology to assess users’ motivation to view TV content through mobile devices. A sample consists of 280 respondents was obtained from across the Israeli mobile devices user groups. The findings of the study suggest that individual’s intention to use mobile devices to view TV content is significantly influenced by perceived enjoyment, social factors, perceived convenience and viewing quality, viewing cost, and content variety. Implications for TV providers are identified together with consideration of the limitations of the study and avenues for further research.

New Article: Samuel-Azran et al, In-Group Terrorists in Israeli and Norwegian Press

Samuel-Azran, Tal, Amit Lavie-Dinur, and Yuval Karniel. “Narratives Used to Portray In-Group Terrorists: A Comparative Analysis of the Israeli and Norwegian Press.” Media, War & Conflict 8.1 (2015): 3-19.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1750635214531106

 

Abstract

Studies of US and UK media reveal that the press adheres to a dichotomous religion-based us/them worldview that portrays Muslims as terrorists but ‘repairs’ the image of Jews and Christians as criminals, creating concerns that the Western media promotes a clash-of-civilizations thinking pattern. To examine whether this pattern is representative of other Western democracies, the authors analyzed Israeli press coverage of Jewish settlers’ attacks against Palestinians (N = 134) and Norwegian press coverage of Anders Breivik’s 2011 attacks (N = 223). Content analysis reveals that the Israeli and Norwegian media labeled all the perpetrators ‘terrorists’, the attacks ‘terror’, and the motivation as ‘ideology’ rather than solely mental. The perpetrators – all subscribing to right-wing ideology – were not vindicated despite being Jewish or Christian. Beyond weakening the clash-of-civilizations notion that terrorism discourse in the West is necessarily religion-related, the findings highlight that the US press was ironically more eager than the Israeli media to ‘repair’ the image of Jewish perpetrators. The authors discuss the implications of our findings and suggest directions for future studies of biases in terrorism discourse.

New Book: Navot, The Constitution of Israel: A Contextual Analysis

Navot, Suzie. The Constitution of Israel: A Contextual Analysis. Oxford: Hart, 2014.

 

9781841138350

 

This book presents the main features of the Israeli constitutional system and a topical discussion of Israel’s basic laws. It focuses on constitutional history and the peculiar decision to frame a constitution ‘by stages’. Following its British heritage and the lack of a formal constitution, Israel’s democracy grew for more than four decades on the principle of parliamentary supremacy. Introducing a constitutional model and the concept of judicial review of laws, the ‘constitutional revolution’ of the 1990s started a new era in Israel’s constitutional history. The book’s main themes include: constitutional principles; the legislature and the electoral system; the executive; the protection of fundamental rights and the crucial role of the Supreme Court in Israel’s constitutional discourse. It further presents Israel’s unique aspects as a Jewish and democratic state, and its ongoing search for the right balance between human rights and national security. Finally, the book offers a critical discussion of the development of Israel’s constitution and local projects aimed at enacting a single and comprehensive text.

Click here for a full Table of Contents (PDF).

New Article: Sznitman and Lewis, Cannabis in Israeli Newspaper Coverage

Sznitman, Sharon R. and Nehama Lewis. “Is Cannabis an Illicit Drug or a Medicine? A Quantitative Framing Analysis of Israeli Newspaper Coverage.” International Journal of Drug Policy 26.5 (2015): 446-52.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.drugpo.2015.01.010

 

Abstract

Background

Various countries and states, including Israel, have recently legalized cannabis for therapeutic purposes (CTP). These changes have received mass media coverage and prompted national and international dialogue about the status of cannabis and whether or not it can be defined as a (legitimate) medicine, illicit and harmful drug, or both. News media framing may influence, and be influenced by, public opinion regarding CTP and support for CTP license provisions for patients. This study examines the framing of CTP in Israeli media coverage and the association between media coverage and trends in the provision of CTP licenses in Israel over time.

Methods

All published news articles relevant to CTP and the framing of cannabis (N = 214) from the three highest circulation newspapers in Israel were content analyzed. Articles were published between January 2007 and June 2013, a period in which CTP licenses granted by the Ministry of Health increased substantially.

Results

In the majority of CTP news articles (69%), cannabis was framed as a medicine, although in almost one third of articles (31%) cannabis was framed as an illicit drug. The relative proportion of news items in which cannabis was framed as an illicit drug fluctuated during the study period, but was unrelated to linear or curvilinear trends in CTP licensing.

Conclusion

The relatively large proportion of news items framing cannabis as a medicine is consistent with growing support for the expansion of the Israel’s CTP program.

 

Highlights

  • We examine the framing of cannabis for therapeutic purposes (CTP) in newspapers.
  • We use quantitative content analysis.
  • News articles generally describe cannabis as a medicine and not an illicit drug.
  • Trends in media framing are unrelated to trends in CTP licenses.

 

 

New Article: Hagay and Meyers, National Narrative in Coverage of Israeli National Soccer Team Matches

Hagay, Haim and Oren Meyers. “Everybody’s Team? The National Narrative in the Hebrew Press Covering Israeli National Soccer Team Matches.” Media, Culture, and Society 37.4 (2015): 530-46.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/

 

Abstract

Sports media offer a unique discourse site because the nationalistic nature of reporting is often radicalized and in most cases ‘the national flag is waved with eternal enthusiasm’. Therefore, this study examined changes in the coverage of the Israeli national soccer team between 1949 and 2006 through an exploration of the identity of the journalistic narratives’ storytellers and protagonists. Our findings illuminate a complex picture: whereas during the Israel’s formative era sports reporters pursued a patriotic narrative that praised the players for their fighting spirit and contribution to national prestige, in recent decades the sports sections echo a new variety of local, professional, and gender voices that challenge the supposedly natural hegemony of national identity. These changes can be explained by factors rooted in the fields of journalism, sports, and the politics of identity.

Lecture: Nossek, Military Censorship as a Protector of the Freedom of the Press

NYUTCIS

5/4/15 – 5:30pm
14A Washington Mews, 1st Floor

Dr. Hillel Nossek

The Israeli Paradox:

Military Censorship as a Protector of the Freedom of the Press

 

Although the state of Israel is a democracy, military censorship has been in use since its establishment in 1948 and is still imposed. This lecture will analyze the theoretical and practical grounds for military censorship in Israel based on an agreement between relevant parties: the government, the army, the media, and the public. Analysis of Israeli military censorship reveals that military censorship is not necessarily the enemy of the media and the public’s right to know. On the contrary and paradoxically, we show that in Israel’s case, military censorship not only performs its task of preventing the publication of information that threatens the national security, at times it sustains the country’s freedom of the press, freedom of information, and the public’s right to know.  Several case studies, including recent ones, will be analyzed to sustain the basic arguments presented in the lecture.

Nossek

Hillel Nossek is Dean of the School of Media Studies and a professor of communications at The College of Management, Academic Studies (Israel). He is also the Head of the Mediated Communication, Public Opinion and Society Section of the the International Association for Media and Communication Research (IAMCR). He has published books and articles in various fields of research such as political violence, terrorism and media, news, social and cultural implications of Israel’s new media map with emphasis on reading in the age of multi-channel communications. Prof. Nossek is currently serving as a Visiting Scholar with the Taub Center for Israel Studies at NYU.

RSVP by E-mail.

New Article: Lavie-Dinur et al, Media’s Coverage of Israeli Female Political Criminals

Lavie-Dinur, Amit, Yuval Karniel, and Tal Azran. “‘Bad Girls’: The Use of Gendered Media Frames in the Israeli Media’s Coverage of Israeli Female Political Criminals.” Journal of Gender Studies 24.3 (2015): 326-46.

 

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09589236.2013.841572

 

Abstract

The study examined news media coverage of Israeli female political criminals to determine how the media construct and portray women who commit ideological crimes against the state, ultimately to discern what these framing choices suggest about women involved in political crimes. Studies show that the media tend to rely on stereotypical gender frames to portray female criminals and their motivations to the public. These frames depict women perpetrators as motivated to commit political crime for personal reasons as opposed to political reasons, which are often cited for male criminal behavior. The study examined the Israeli news media’s use of stereotypical gender news frames when reporting on three Israeli women who committed ideological crimes against the state. The study compared the coverage of these cases among three Israeli newspapers representing different political affinities. As a country with a long history of political conflict, Israel offers a unique opportunity to examine gender bias in the media’s coverage of female actors in the public sphere. The study’s theoretical contribution lies in its analysis of Israeli female political criminals who, by definition of their crime, acted within the political sphere. The study confirms previous research on the subject – mainly that the media rely on gender frames and explanations of personal motive in its portrayals of female criminals.

New Article: Mengistu and Avraham, Ethiopian Immigrants in the Israeli National Press

Mengistu, Germaw and Eli Avraham. “‘Others Among Their Own People’: The Social Construction of Ethiopian Immigrants in the Israeli National Press.” Communication, Culture & Critique (early view, online first).

URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/cccr.12095/abstract

Abstract

The article examines the ways in which the national press includes or excludes the Ethiopian immigrants in the Jewish-Israeli collective, and the changes applicable to these inclusion and exclusion practices. The study uses qualitative and quantitative content analysis, with reference to postcolonial theory. The findings of the research show that Israeli journalism tended, on one hand, to include the immigrants within the ancient Jewish collective, while at the same time, treating them as being culturally ignorant. This research provides a complex definition of the boundaries of the others, while also shedding light on an important subject, namely the representation of Ethiopian immigrants in Israeli media, which has been neglected by social science researchers.

 

New Article: Schejter & Tirosh, Media Reform and Social Justice in Israel

Schejter, Amit and Noam Tirosh. “‘What Is Wrong Cannot Be Made Right’? Why Has Media Reform Been Sidelined in the Debate Over ‘Social Justice’ in Israel?” Critical Studies in Media Communication 32.1 (2015): 16-32.

 

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15295036.2014.998514

 

Abstract

When hundreds of thousands of Israelis took to the streets in the summer of 2011, protesting the high cost of living and demanding “social justice,” the ills of the media system including its concentration, the growing digital divide, and the implosion of public broadcasting were not made part of the social movement’s agenda. This study employs a justice-based theory for media, analyzing three types of “products” of the social movement: the unionization of media workers, the establishment of alternative media, and the reports recommending regulatory/institutional reform. We attempt to understand why media reform, an essential element without which social justice cannot be fully achieved, has been sidelined in the debate over the ways to achieve “social justice” in Israel.

New Book: Ribke, A Genre Approach to Celebrity Politics

Ribke, Nahuel. Righteous A Genre Approach to Celebrity Politics. Global Patterns of Passage from Media to Politics. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015.

 
9781137409386
 

The study of celebrities has been the focus of several works from two main fields: Cultural Studies and Political Communication. But up until now, such works have produced only fragmented views of links between celebrity culture, the entertainment industries, and the political systems, which this book attempts to transcend. Analyzing the movement of celebrities to politics, this book contributes to a thorough understanding of the links between media industries and the political system, providing tools for grasping the varied ways in which media capital is converted into electoral power. To achieve this goal, Nahuel Ribke has assembled a wide range of data from the United States, Brazil and Israel, providing a complex comparative view of the migration of celebrities to politics, which incorporates a historical and cultural analysis, an examination of the respective political institutions, as well as an understanding of the impact local cultural industries had on the development of celebrity politics.

 

Table of Contents

1. Celebrity Politics: A Theoretical and Historical Perspective
PART I: TELEVISION CELEBRITIES AND ISRAELI POLITICS
2. Female Models in Israeli Politics: From the Runway to TV, and from the Small Screen to the Knesset
3. Like Father Like Son: Converting Media Capital into Political Power (Or, How an Israeli TV Presenter Became Finance Minister)
PART II: MAKING MUSIC MATTER: THE ELECTORAL POLITICS OF POP CELEBRITY IN LATIN AMERICA
4. Tropicalizing Politics: Gilberto Gil’s perplexing Miscegenation of Music and Politics
5. The Harvard Lawyer against The Bad Boy from Bronx: Explaining the Political Performance Gaps Between Rubén Blades and Willie Colón
PART III: CINEMA CELEBRITIES IN AMERICAN POLITICS
6. The American Pattern of Celebrity Politics: From ‘Military’ Role Model to Civilian Hero?
7. Entertainment Industries and ‘Liberal’ Celebrities: The Failure of Converting Attention into Political Power
PART IV: CELETOID POLITICS: VICTIMS, HEROES AND ORDINARY PEOPLE AS A VALUABLE ELECTORAL ASSET
8. Juan Carlos Blumberg and the Populism of Fear Politics in Argentina: Converting Mediatic Crimes into Political Capital
9. Reality Shows and Celebrity Politics: An Accelerated Platform for Rookie Politicians?
Conclusions
Bibliography
Index

 

NAHUEL RIBKE obtained his PhD from Tel Aviv University in 2010. His doctoral thesis examines the emergence and expansion of the Globo Television Network during the military regime in Brazil (1965-1985) through the analysis of historical, political, economic, cultural and technological aspects of television work. His research interests cover Institutional and Cultural Processes through Latin American Mass Media, Celebrity Politics and Mass Media History.

 

 

 

New Article: Sela-Shayovitz, The Role of Israeli Media in the Social Construction of Gang Rape

Sela-Shayovitz, Revital. “‘They Are All Good Boys’: The Role of the Israeli Media in the Social Construction of Gang Rape.” Feminist Media Studies (early view, online first).

 

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14680777.2014.993675

 

Abstract

This paper analyzes the construction of incidents of gang rape in Israeli newspapers between the years 2000 and 2010. The study examines the differences between the news media framing of gang rape and individual rape. Results indicate that the coverage of gang rape significantly differs from that of individual rape. Newspaper coverage over-emphasizes instances of gang rape in relation to individual occurrences of rape by means of sensational headlines and “yellow” journalism. Moreover, the construction of gang rape reflects a convergence of gender, race, and class oppression through the blaming and marginalizing of victims, criminalizing rapists from socially marginal groups, and absolving offenders most closely associated with the upper middle class. These findings suggest that the Israeli media play a key role in perpetuating patriarchal hegemony and social inequality.

 

 

 

 

ToC: Israel Affairs 20,4 (2014) – Political Economy in Israel

Israel Affairs, Volume 20, Issue 4, October 2014 is now available online on Taylor & Francis Online.

Special Issue: Political Economy in Israel

Introduction

Introduction: the many faces of Israel’s political economy Gideon Doron & Ofer Arian Pages: 445-451 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.955651

Part I The Superstructure

The development of social policy research in Israel John Gal & Roni Holler Pages: 452-469 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.955652

Between the quality of the environment and the quality of the performances in Israeli local government Gideon Doron & Fany Yuval Pages: 470-483 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.955653

The political economy of human rights: the struggle over the establishment of a human rights commission in Israel Nurit Hashimshony-Yaffe & Assaf Meydani Pages: 484-502 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.955654

Part II Structure as details perspective

Political economy and work values: the case of Jews and Arabs in Israel Moshe Sharabi Pages: 503-516 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.955655

The impact of electoral reforms on voting preferences: the Israeli 1996 and 1999 cases Hani Zubida & David Nachmias Pages: 517-529 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.955656

Is an ‘economic peace’ possible? Israel and globalization since the 1970s Tal Sadeh Pages: 530-565 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.955657

The evolution of public colleges in Israel Aliza Shenhar Pages: 566-576 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.955658

The Visible Hand: economic censorship in Israeli media Miri Gal-Ezer Pages: 577-612 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.955659

What do facts have to do with the summer 2011 protests? – Structuring reality Ofer Arian Pages: 613-631 DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.955661

Editorial Board

Editorial Board Pages: ebi-ebi DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.961696

 

 

ToC: Israel Studies 19.3 (2014)

Israel Studies 19.3 (2014): Table of Contents

New Book: Elbaz, Loyalty to the Source (in Hebrew)

Elbaz, Sagi. Loyalty to the Source: Media, Ideology and Political Culture in Israel. Tel Aviv: Resling, 2014 (in Hebrew).

585-1132b

URL: http://www.resling.co.il/book.asp?series_id=3&book_id=756

אלבז, שגיא. נאמנות למקור. תקשורת, אידיאולוגיה ותרבות פוליטית בישראל. תל אביב: רסלינג, 2014.

על רקע חילופי האליטות וחוסר היציבות במערכת הפוליטית, ולאור השינויים המבניים במפה התקשורתית, ניתן היה לצפות שכלי התקשורת ישקפו את התמורות הסוציו-פוליטיות בישראל. ציפייה זו מתבססת על הנחה מוקדמת, ערכית ביסודה, שעל תקשורת המונים בחברה דמוקרטית מוטלת האחריות לקיים שוק חופשי של רעיונות ולייצג מנעד רחב של דעות במרחב הציבורי. ואולם ספרו של שגיא אלבז מגלה שקיימים פערים גדולים בין סוגיות הליבה בשיח התקשורתי לבין התכנים השוטפים. לטענת אלבז, התקשורת משקפת את התמורות הפוליטיות, הביטחוניות והכלכליות בחברה הישראלית, במיוחד על רקע שינויים במאפייני האליטה הפוליטית והחברתית, אבל יחסה לנושאי ליבה לאומיים אינו משתנה באופן יסודי.

המחבר מפתח מודל אשר מניח ששלוש קבוצות כוח – אליטות פוליטיות, צבאיות וכלכליות – הממוקמות במוקדי הכוח המרכזיים של החברה הישראלית משתמשות בכלי התקשורת כדי לגייס הסכמה ציבורית רחבה לסדר הקיים וכדי להצדיק את שלטונן. בין השאר הן מגבשות ליבה ערכית-קונצנזואלית שעיקריה הם: לאומיות יהודית, תרבות ביטחונית וליברליזם כלכלי. כל אחת מסוגיות הליבה האלה מיוצרת, משוכפלת ומופצת להמונים בתיווך אמצעי התקשורת – אותם מנגנוני הסכמה אידיאולוגיים הכפופים לאליטות. לצד ניתוח תוכן עשיר, הספר מכיל ראיונות עומק עם פוליטיקאים ועיתונאים בכירים אשר שופכים אור על דפוסי העבודה של המדיה ועל מידת המעורבות של האליטות בעיצוב סוגיות הליבה בתקשורת הישראלית.

הספר נאמנות למקור מתבסס על עבודת הדוקטור של המחבר, אשר זיכתה אותו בפרס הדוקטורט המצטיין במדע המדינה לשנת 2013, מטעם האגודה הישראלית למדע המדינה.

ד”ר שגיא אלבז הוא חוקר, עורך ומומחה לתקשורת פוליטית. ספרו הראשון, “דעת מיעוט בעיתונות העברית – ייצוג האוכלוסייה הערבית במרחב ציבורי משתנה” (הוצאת דיונון, 2013), זכה לשבחי הביקורת.

New Book: Cohen, God, Jews, and the Media

Cohen, Yoel. God, Jews and the Media. Religion and Israel’s Media, Routledge Jewish studies series. London and New York: Routledge, 2012.

cover

Reviews

  • Abrams, Nathan. “Review.” Journal of Religion, Media, and Digital Culture 2.1 (2013): 4 pp.
  • Shapiro, Haim. “Review.” Scholars for Peace in the Middle East, August 12, 2013.
  • Madmoni-Gerber, Shoshana. “Review.” International Journal of Middle East Studies 45.3 (2013): 626-8.
  • Scotton, Jim. “Review.” Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly 90.3 (2013): 610-611.
  • Rosenthal, Michelle. “Review.” (in Hebrew).

Cite: Shukrun-Nagar, Coverage of the Israeli Haredi Community as a Case in Point

Shukrun-Nagar, Pnina. “The Construction of Paradoxes in News Discourse: The Coverage of the Israeli Haredi Community as a Case in Point.” Discourse Studies 15.4 (2013): 463-80.

 

URL: http://dis.sagepub.com/content/15/4/463.abstract

 

Abstract

This article focuses on the construction of two types of non-logical paradoxes in news discourse: 1) inconsistencies of positions and acts; 2) conflicts between reality and expectations or common sense. I will argue that these paradoxes are constructed by various discursive devices and will demonstrate the key role played by conventional and conversational implicatures in this regard. The discussion will focus on 23 items covering disputes between ultra-Orthodox (Haredim) and secular Jews, broadcast on mainstream Israeli television news in 2009. I will show that the journalists consistently attribute paradoxicality to Haredim, and that this corresponds with the common public bitterness towards them because they enjoy financial support from the government, while sharing little of the economic and security burden. Moreover, I will argue that the paradoxical representations of Haredim rely on the secular ‘we’ group view and serve to base its common sense and norms.

Cite: Lachover and Bossin, , Femininity and Feminism in the Life of Hannah Semer

Lachover, Einat and Donna Bossin. “Professionalism, Femininity and Feminism in the Life of Hannah Semer (1924–2003), First Lady of Israeli Journalism.” Nashim 24 (2013): 120-38.

 

URL: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/nashim/v024/24.lachover.html

 

Abstract

Hannah Semer broke through the glass ceiling and glass walls of her profession in a way no other Israeli female journalist had done before. This paper seeks to examine Semer’s dual identities as a woman and a journalist and to analyze the nature of these two identities as evidenced in her work, by considering the following questions: What obstacles did Semer face as a woman in her profession and, more specifically, in positions assumed to be within exclusively male domains? How did she cope with these obstacles? Did she experience significant tension between the cultural definitions of femininity and of professionalism? And if she did, how did this sense of discord find expression in her work, and how did she resolve the tension and disharmony inherent in being a woman journalist? These questions are relevant to the discussion of relations between women and journalism both in Israel and worldwide.