New Book: McKee, Dwelling in Conflict

McKee, Emily Dwelling in Conflict. Negev Landscapes and the Boundaries of Belonging. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2016.

 
Dwelling in Conflict

Land disputes in Israel are most commonly described as stand-offs between distinct groups of Arabs and Jews. In Israel’s southern region, the Negev, Jewish and Bedouin Arab citizens and governmental bodies contest access to land for farming, homes, and industry and struggle over the status of unrecognized Bedouin villages. “Natural,” immutable divisions, both in space and between people, are too frequently assumed within these struggles.

 

Dwelling in Conflict offers the first study of land conflict and environment based on extensive fieldwork within both Arab and Jewish settings. It explores planned towns for Jews and for Bedouin Arabs, unrecognized villages, and single-family farmsteads, as well as Knesset hearings, media coverage, and activist projects. Emily McKee sensitively portrays the impact that dividing lines—both physical and social—have on residents. She investigates the political charge of people’s everyday interactions with their environments and the ways in which basic understandings of people and “their” landscapes drive political developments. While recognizing deep divisions, McKee also takes seriously the social projects that residents engage in to soften and challenge socio-environmental boundaries. Ultimately, Dwelling in Conflict highlights opportunities for boundary crossings, revealing both contemporary segregation and the possible mutability of these dividing lines in the future.

 

Table of Contents

  • Introduction
  • 1. Narrating Present Pasts
  • 2. Seeking Recognition
  • Bridge: Distant Neighbors
  • 3. Coping with Lost Land
  • 4. Reforming Community
  • 5. Challenging Boundaries
  • Conclusion

 

EMILY McKEE is Assistant Professor in the Anthropology Department and the Institute for the Study of Environment, Sustainability, and Energy at Northern Illinois University.

 

 

 

Performance: Miriam Engel-Angela Dance Company, Israeli Identity Inside Israel and Out (Berkeley, Nov 5, 2015)

Thursday, November 5
PUBLIC PERFORMANCE
Israeli Identity Inside Israel and Out: A Conversation through Movement
Miriam Engel – Angela Dance Company
The Miriam Engel-Angela Dance Company will perform  “De-parts,” a contemporary dance piece that relates to the connection between identity and land

Reception 7 PM, Performance and Conversation: 7:30 pm
Location: Berkeley Hillel
Co-sponsored by Berkeley Hillel and Bears for Israel

New Article: Weil & Levin, Prioritizing for Conservation in a Densely Populated Country

Weil, Gilad and Noam Levin. “Can Siting Algorithms Assist in Prioritizing for Conservation in a Densely Populated and Land Use Allocated Country? – Israel as a Case Study.” Israel Journal of Ecology and Evolution 61.1 (2015): 50-60.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15659801.2015.1035858

 

Abstract

Over the years, Israel’s centralized national planning framework and the intense competition on the limited available land played a crucial factor in designing the spatial distribution of the protected areas in Israel. When examining the spatial properties of the protected areas, it was found that they do not adequately represent the variety of the ecosystems in Israel. According to the systematic conservation planning approach, we aimed to examine how optimization algorithms (e.g., MARXAN) would inform us on high priority areas for conservation. We created proxies for anthropogenic disturbance, and for the susceptibility of designating new protected areas subject to existing national and regional land use master plans. Our conservation targets were defined on the basis of the spatial distribution of 461 endangered vertebrate and plant species (red species), as well as by defining and mapping 21 main ecosystems. The results highlight the limited options of significantly improving the representativeness provided by the existing protected areas, due to the diminishing availability of open areas, which may be available to be designated as protected areas. However, the results also emphasize the conservation potential of agricultural land, as well as the need for preserving small and fragmented rare habitats.

 
 
 

New Article and Response: Elsana and Hwang, Application of the Customary Land Rights Model on the Arab-Bedouin Case in Israel

Elsana, Morad. “The Recognition of Indigenous Peoples’ Land: Application of the Customary Land Rights Model on the Arab-Bedouin Case in Israel.” Georgetown Journal of Law & Modern Critical Race Perspectives 7.1 (2015): 45-67.

Hwang, Julie H. “Reaction to: The Recognition of Indigenous Peoples’ Land: Application of the Customary Land Rights Model on the Arab-Bedouin Case in Israel.” Georgetown Journal of Law & Modern Critical Race Perspectives 7.1 (2015): 69-70.

 

URL: https://articleworks.cadmus.com/geolaw/mcr00116.html

 

Excerpt

Based on the Australian experience, this paper introduced the idea of recognizing Bedouin land rights based on the recognition of their customary law. To illustrate this idea, this paper introduced the recognition of Aboriginal land in Australia and then applied the Australian model on the Bedouin case in Israeli. The recognition of Aboriginal land rights in Australia relies mainly on the existence of three elements. The first is the existence of a system of law, such as Aboriginal customary law; the second is the existence of a connection to land, which means the existence of a traditional land rights system; the third element is the existence of a legal recognition option for these elements in the state legal system. One such option is the native title doctrine in Australia. This last element is a bridge that connects the indigenous peoples’ customary law with the state law and enables the state to recognize indigenous peoples’ customary law and their rights under their customary system.

The second part of this paper addressed Bedouin land recognition. This part applied the Australian model of land recognition on the Bedouin case. It mainly showed the existence of the three elements for recognition in the Bedouin land case in Israel. First, it demonstrated the existence of the Bedouin traditional system of law; second, the existence of Bedouin connection to the land; and then it introduced the third element, which is the recognition option or the “bridge” that demonstrates how the Israeli legal system includes two options that could work as a connection to Bedouin customary law. The first bridge option is through Tribal Courts Regulations and the second is the principle of custom as a source of law.

In conclusion, similar to Australia and other countries that have recognized indigenous land rights, the legal system in Israel includes sufficient legal elements that can lead to the recognition of Bedouin traditional law that would bring recognition of their traditional land rights.

Excerpt from Hwang’s response: Perhaps judicial resolution is not the most promising course of action in asserting land rights for the Bedouins. Sarah Matari suggests that the power imbalance and historical mistreatment of Arab Bedouins in Israel make a courtroom battle a highly unsuccessful option for the Bedouins.9 Instead, she suggests a series of mediation as a possible way for the Negev Bedouins to discuss with the Israeli government to negotiate their rights to the land. 1O Although there is serious doubt as to the efficacy of any mediation due to the historical hostility between the Negev Bedouins and Israelis, I think mediation may be a more hopeful option for the Bedouins because the native title doctrine approach has its limitation when applied to the Negev Bedouins in Israel.

 

New Article: Hananel, Rethinking Israel’s National Land Policy

Hananel, Ravit. “The Land Narrative: Rethinking Israel’s National Land Policy.” Land Use Policy 45 (2015): 128-40.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.landusepol.2015.01.015

 

Abstract

The land narrative tells the unique story of Israel’s national land policy. Its historical and ideological roots are in the early 1900s, when the Zionist movement and the Jewish National Fund were founded, but it continues to influence spatial policy and land allocation in Israel today. The land narrative is based on the distinction between the urban sector and the rural-agricultural sector and on the clear preference—at least at the ideological level—for the rural-agricultural sector. However, despite the decision-makers’ clear preference for the members of the cooperative and communal rural sector, over time the urban residents’ have received more land rights de facto. This study provides an explanation of this dissonance by exploring the land narrative, examines its broad implications for Israeli society, and discusses its future implications.

ToC: Journal of Palestine Studies 44.1 (2014)

Table of Contents Alert
University of California Press is happy to notify you that the new issue of Journal of Palestine Studies is now available. The online issues of this journal are hosted on JSTOR on behalf of University of California Press.
Journal Cover Journal of Palestine Studies
Vol. 44, No. 1, Autumn 2014
SPECIAL ISSUE: OPERATION PROTECTIVE EDGE

Cover
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1
Front Matter
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1
Table of Contents
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1

FROM THE EDITOR

The Dahiya Doctrine, Proportionality, and War Crimes
Rashid I. Khalidi
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 5-13.

ANALYSIS OF THE WAR

Politicide in Gaza: How Israel’s Far Right Won the War
Max Blumenthal
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 14-28.
Another Freedom Summer
Robin D.G. Kelley
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 29-41.
The Psychosis of Permanent War
Chris Hedges
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 42-51.
The Twelve Wars on Gaza
Jean-Pierre Filiu
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 52-60.
The Implications of Joining the ICC after Operation Protective Edge
Victor Kattan
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 61-73.
Photos
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 74-75.

AN OFFICIAL PERSPECTIVE

Interview with Hanan Ashrawi: Oslo, the PA, and Reinventing the PLO
Rashid Khalidi
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 76-87.
Photos
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 88-90.

DISSECTING THE DISCOURSE

Blaming the Victims
Diana Buttu
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 91-96.
Crisis Moments: Shifting the Discourse
Yousef Munayyer
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 97-105.
Interview with Noura Erakat: Framing the Palestinian Narrative
Nehad Khader
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 106-117.
Photos
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 118-119.

PERSONAL REFLECTIONS

After the Smoke Clears: Gaza’s Everyday Resistance
Laila El-Haddad
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 120-125.
Interview with Dr. Basil Baker: Quick Death under Fire, Slow Death under Siege
Nehad Khader
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 126-132.
A Response to Elie Wiesel
Sara Roy
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 133-134.
Photos
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 135-136.

CENTENNIAL PERSPECTIVE

Palestine and Palestine Studies: One Century after World War I and the Balfour Declaration
Walid Khalidi
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 137-147.

RECENT BOOKS

Review: The Battle for Justice in Palestine
The Battle for Justice in Palestine by by Ali Abunimah
Review by: Richard Falk
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 148-150.
Review: 40 Years of Israeli Occupation: 1967–2007
40 Years of Israeli Occupation: 1967–2007 by by Hiltrud Awad; Hilmi S. Salem; Suhail Khalilieh; Jad Issac
Review by: Ahmad El-Atrash and Lubna Shaheen
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 150-152.
Review: Arab Christians in British Mandate Palestine: Communalism and Nationalism, 1917–1948
Arab Christians in British Mandate Palestine: Communalism and Nationalism, 1917–1948 by Noah Haiduc-Dale
Review by: George Emile Irani
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 152-154.
Review: UNRWA and Palestinian Refugees: From Relief and Works to Human Development
UNRWA and Palestinian Refugees: From Relief and Works to Human Development by edited by Sari Hanafi; Leila Hilal; Lex Takkenberg
Review by: Benjamin Schiff
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 154-156.
Review: Zionism and Land Tenure in Mandate Palestine
Zionism and Land Tenure in Mandate Palestine by by Aida Asim Essaid
Review by: Michael R. Fischbach
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 156-158.
Review: Unfree in Palestine: Registration, Documentation and Movement Restriction
Unfree in Palestine: Registration, Documentation and Movement Restriction by by Nadia Abu-Zahra; Adah Kay
Review by: Roger Heacock
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 158-160.
Review: Memories of Absence: How Muslims Remember Jews in Morocco
Memories of Absence: How Muslims Remember Jews in Morocco by by Aomar Boum
Review by: Sami Shalom Chetrit
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 160-163.
SELECTIONS FROM THE PRESS
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 164-190.
PALESTINE UNBOUND
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 191-203.
UPDATE ON CONFLICT AND DIPLOMACY
Ben White
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 204-237.
DOCUMENTS AND SOURCE MATERIAL
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 238-272.
JPS Responds to Israel’s Prime Minister
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 273-274.