New Article: Shetach & Marcus, Citizenship-Behavior, Cooperation and Job Satisfaction of Medical and Nursing Teams

Shetach, Ana, and Ohad Marcus. “Citizenship-Behavior, Cooperation and Job Satisfaction of Medical and Nursing Teams in an Israeli Hospital.” Team Performance Management  21.3-4 (2015): 181-98.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/TPM-11-2014-0058

 

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate into the relationships among citizenship behavior within medical and nursing teams, cooperation among these teams within hospital units and job satisfaction of members of those teams.

Data were gathered via questionnaires, administered to 107 doctors and nurses of a small hospital in Israel, regarding their job satisfaction, their evaluation of the citizenship behavior within their own professional team (medical or nursing) and the extent of cooperation of their own team with the other professional team. Preacher and Hayes’s mediation analyses were carried out on the data.

Findings 

The findings show that medical–nursing cooperation mediates the relationship between citizenship behavior within the professional team (medical or nursing) and job satisfaction. When analyzed separately for doctors and nurses, results show that job satisfaction is predicted by the cooperation between the medical and nursing staff within hospital units, for nurses only. Citizenship behavior is shown to predict job satisfaction for each of the two professional sectors. Although for nurses, both factors affect their levels of job satisfaction, whereas for the doctors, cooperation affects citizenship behavior within the medical team, which, in turn, affects their job satisfaction.

The research sample is small and culturally specific, thus limiting the generalization potential of this study.

The unique nature of teamwork within hospital departments is hereby investigated. The findings shed light on a critical issue of hospital human resource management, which has not been previously investigated, and may have practical implications regarding hospitals’ overall management policies.

New Article: Meydan et al, Managing the Shortage of Acute Care Hospital Beds

Meydan, Chanan, Ziona Haklai, Barak Gordon, Joseph Mendlovic, and Arnon Afek. “Managing the Increasing Shortage of Acute Care Hospital Beds in Israel.” Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 21.1 (2015): 79-84.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jep.12246

 

Abstract

Rationale, aims and objectives

Israel’s healthcare system has been facing increasing hospital bed shortage over the last few decades. Community-based services and shortening length of stay have helped to ease this problem, but hospitals continue to suffer from serious overload and saturation. The objective of this study is to present hospitalization trends in Israel’s internal medicine departments.

Methods

The data is based on the National Hospital Discharges database (NHDR) in the Israeli Health Ministry, pertaining to hospitalizations in all internal medicine departments nationwide between 2000 and 2012.

Results

Total yearly hospitalization days, representing healthcare burden, had increased by 4.2% during the study period, driven mainly by the most advanced age groups. The rate of total hospitalization days per 100,000 people for all the age groups has decreased by 17.6%, but the oldest patient group had a modest reduction in comparison (7.5%). The parameter of age correlated with length of stay and readmission rates, and neither decreased during the surveyed years.

Conclusions

These results demonstrated that the healthcare burden on acute internal medicine services has been reduced mostly for middle-aged populations but only modestly for elderly populations. The length of hospital stay and the readmission rates have reached and maintained a plateau in recent years, regardless of age. The findings of this study call for planning specific to elderly populations in light of changing demographics. Possible directions may include renewed emphasis on internal medicine and geriatric medicine, and efforts to shorten hospitalization time by extended utilization of multidisciplinary primary care.

New Article: Simchai and Keshet, New Age in Israel

Simchai, Dalit and Yael Keshet. “New Age in Israel: Formative ethos, identity blindness, and implications for healthcare.” Health (early view; online first).

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1363459315595848

 

Abstract

This article presents a critical analysis of New Age culture. We draw on two empirical studies conducted in Israel and show that the lofty notions about freedom from the shackles of socially structured identities and the unifying potential this holds, as well as the claim regarding the basic equality of human beings, are utopian. Blindness toward ethno-national identity reinforces identification with a self-evident hegemonic perception, thereby leading to the exclusion of peripheral groups such as indigenous populations. This exclusion is manifested in the discourse symbolically as well as in the praxis of complementary and alternative medicine, which is one of the main fields in which New Age culture is involved. Thus, the unifying ethos in the New Age culture becomes an illusionary paradise. This article contributes to the study of power relationships between New Age culture in diverse Western countries and the native and peripheral populations of these countries, and to the sociological study of complementary and alternative medicine incorporated into health organizations.

 
 
 
 

New Book: Green, Organ Transplantation (in Hebrew)

Green, Yossi. Organ Transplantation. Legislation, Ruling and Practice. Tel Aviv: Resing, 2015 (in Hebrew).

 

organtransplant

 

 

After three decades of discussions and disputes in the Knesset and the general public, two laws passed in 2008: the organ transplantation law (2008), and the respiratory brain death law (2008). Both of these laws are supposed to regulate the procedures for organ transplantation, to overcome the ongoing shortage of organs for transplantation and at the same time prevent the development of negative phenomena which are contrary to the values ​​of the State of Israel.

This book focuses on the legal aspect of organ transplant procedure in Israel. It serves as an annotated and clear summary of the legal approach, relevant not only to jurists and lawyers, but also to an audience of “consumers” – i.e. organ donors and their families and patients awaiting transplant surgery and their families. The author analyzes the law and its provisions by each section to allow anyone interested to become familiar with the intricacies of its implications. In addition, each section is supplemented with cumulative legal knowledge, as well as remarks and reservations concerning the feasibility of the law in the future. Moreover, alongside a practical analysis, the author presents a broad picture of the substantive issues, allowing the reader to examine all the considerations taken into account before the legislator formulated the final version of the law.

The subjects discussed in the book include: the prohibition on organ trade, the feasibility of altruistic organ donation, the status of the National Transplant Center and its functions, the power of the assessment committees responsible for the permit of organ donation, the procedures for taking organs from the living and the dead, including the legal validity of that Adi cards and the “in my heart” cards. The priority procedure for patients awaiting a transplant is also examined from a critical standpoint.

New Article: Keshet et al, Underrepresentation of Arab Physicians in Israel

Keshet, Yael, Ariela Popper-Giveon, and Ido Liberman. “Intersectionality and Underrepresentation among Health Care Workforce: The Case of Arab Physicians in Israel.” Israel Journal of Health Policy Research 4.18 (2015): 13pp.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13584-015-0004-0

 

Abstract

Background

An intersectionality approach that addresses the non-additive influences of social categories and power structures, such as gender and ethnicity, is used as a research paradigm to further understanding the complexity of health inequities. While most researchers adopt an intersectionality approach to study patients’ health status, in this article we exemplify its usefulness and importance for studying underrepresentation in the health care workforce. Our research objectives were to examine gender patterns of underrepresentation in the medical profession among the Arab minority in Israel.

Methods

We used both quantitative and qualitative methodologies. The quantitative data were obtained from the 2011 Labor Force Survey conducted by the Israeli Central Bureau of Statistics, which encompassed some 24,000 households. The qualitative data were obtained through ten semi-structured, in-depth interviews conducted during 2013 with Arab physicians and with six nurses working in Israeli hospitals.

Results

The findings indicate that with respect to physicians, the Arab minority in Israel is underrepresented in the medical field, and that this is due to Arab women’s underrepresentation. Arab women’s employment and educational patterns impact their underrepresentation in medicine. Women are expected to enter traditional gender roles and conform to patriarchal and collectivist values, which makes it difficult for them to study medicine.

Conclusions

Using an intersectionality approach to study underrepresentation in medicine provides a foundation for action aimed at improving public health and reducing health disparities.

 
 
 
 

New Article: Warshawski, Collaborative Work with Nurses in Israel

Warshawski, Sigalit. “The State of Collaborative Work with Nurses in Israel: A Mixed Method Study.” International Journal of Health Planning and Management (early view; online first).

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hpm.2281

 

Abstract

Effective collaboration among health professionals is associated with patient safety, quality of care and professionals’ satisfaction. Nurse–physician collaboration has been a topic of substantial research worldwide. In Israel, few studies have examined this subject, but none has explored health professionals’ collaborative practice with nurses, although nursing in Israel is experiencing significant professional changes.

The aim of this study was to explore health professionals’ attitudes toward collaboration with nurses and how these attitudes relate to their perceptions of role overlap, role clarity and feeling of threat.

Research data were collected employing both quantitative and qualitative methods. A structured questionnaire was fulfilled by 262 participants, following which 12 personal interviews and 12 observations were conducted in hospital wards.

Participants’ attitudes toward collaboration with nurses were found statistically related to their perception of role overlap, role clarity and feeling of professional threat. Interviews and observations indicated immediate mutual assistance among professionals instead of collaborative practice. Interactions were brief and purposeful. The results highlight the absence of an organized procedure for collaborative practice with nurses. Therefore, it is necessary to act at the organization and departments, to assimilate nurses’ role and the importance of collaborative practice. Nurse leaders and nurse educators must consider pragmatic and effective means to promote and articulate nurses’ role in inter-professional clinical settings.

New Article: Kadmon et al, Perceptions of Israeli Women with Breast Cancer Regarding the Role of the Breast Care Nurse

Kadmon, Ilana, Hana Halag, ,Irit Dinur, Aliza Katz, Hana Zohar, Myra Damari, Malka Cohen, Elite Levin, Livia Kislev. “Perceptions of Israeli Women with Breast Cancer Regarding the Role of the Breast Care Nurse throughout All Stages of Treatment: A Multi Center Study.” European Journal of Oncology Nursing 19.1 (2015): 38-43. 

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejon.2014.07.014

 

Abstract

Purpose of the research

The role of the Breast Care Nurse (BCN) is well established in Israel. The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of the BCN on Israeli women with breast cancer at all stages of disease from diagnosis, through treatment and follow-up.

Methods

This was a descriptive multi-center study on 321 women with non-metastatic breast cancer who completed their treatment <5 years before. Data collection took place in seven institutions in Israel, both in hospital and in the community. The women completed two questionnaires: a demographic questionnaire and the Ipswitch Patient Questionnaire looking at various aspects of care. Also included was one qualitative open question. Data analysis was performed checking for outliers and illogical observations.

Key results

In most areas investigated the women perceived the overall contribution of the BCN as very high, with 87% reporting a general contribution of very high or high. It was found that 53% of the women received information about the position from the nurse herself. In 61.3% of the cases, initial contact with the BCN was made at the time of diagnosis.

The qualitative findings concerning the open question are also reported.

Conclusions

According to the perceptions of women with breast cancer in Israel, BCN support is an important part of the patient’s ability to manage their diagnosis and related care. The multi-disciplinary breast cancer team should incorporate BCN specialists as part of their holistic care.

New Article: Goldman et al, Contribution of the Israeli Trauma System to the Survival of Road Traffic Casualties

Goldman, Sharon, Maya Siman-Tov, H. Bahouth, B. Kessel, Y. Klein, M. Michaelson, B. Miklosh, A. Rivkind, G. Shaked, D. Simon, D. Soffer, M. Stein, and Kobi Peleg. “The Contribution of the Israeli Trauma System to the Survival of Road Traffic Casualties.” Traffic Injury Prevention 16.4 (2015): 368-73.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15389588.2014.940458

 

Abstract

Background: According to the World Health Organization, over one million people die annually from traffic crashes, in which over half are pedestrians, bicycle riders and two-wheel motor vehicles. In Israel, during the last decade, mortality from traffic crashes has decreased from 636 in 1998 to 288 in 2011. Professionals attribute the decrease in mortality to enforcement, improved infrastructure and roads and behavioral changes among road users, while no credit is given to the trauma system. Trauma systems which care for severe and critical casualties improve the injury outcomes and reduce mortality among road casualties.

Goals: 1) To evaluate the contribution of the Israeli Health System, especially the trauma system, on the reduction in mortality among traffic casualties. 2) To evaluate the chance of survival among hospitalized traffic casualties, according to age, gender, injury severity and type of road user.

Methods: A retrospective study based on the National Trauma Registry, 1998–2011, including hospitalization data from eight hospitals.

Outcomes: During the study period, the Trauma Registry included 262,947 hospitalized trauma patients, of which 25.3% were due to a road accident. During the study period, a 25% reduction in traffic related mortality was reported, from 3.6% in 1998 to 2.7% in 2011. Among severe and critical (ISS 16+) casualties the reduction in mortality rates was even more significant, 41%; from 18.6% in 1998 to 11.0% in 2011. Among severe and critical pedestrian injuries, a 44% decrease was reported (from 29.1% in 1998 to 16.2% in 2011) and a 65% reduction among bicycle injuries. During the study period, the risk of mortality decreased by over 50% from 1998 to 2011 (OR 0.44 95% 0.33–0.59. In addition, a simulation was conducted to determine the impact of the trauma system on mortality of hospitalized road casualties. Presuming that the mortality rate remained constant at 18.6% and without any improvement in the trauma system, in 2011 there would have been 182 in-hospital deaths compared to the actual 108 traffic related deaths. A 41% difference was noted between the actual number of deaths and the expected number.

Conclusions: This study clearly shows that without any improvement in the health system, specifically the trauma system, the number of traffic deaths would be considerably greater. Although the health system has a significant contribution on reducing mortality, it does not receive the appropriate acknowledgment or resources for its proportion in the fight against traffic accidents.

ToC: Israel Studies 20.2 (2015); Special Section: Bodies In Question

Israel Studies 20.2 (2015) Table of Contents:

 

Special Section: Bodies In Question

Wars of the Wombs: Struggles Over Abortion Policies in Israel (pp. 1-26)

Rebecca Steinfeld

Halutzah or Beauty Queen? National Images of Women in Early Israeli Society (pp. 27-52)

Julie Grimmeisen

‘Re-orient-ation’: Sport and the Transformation of the Jewish Body and Identity (pp. 53-75)

Yotam Hotam

‘Uniting the Nation’s Various Limbs into a National Body’ the Jerusalem People’s House (pp. 76-109)

Esther Grabiner

 

Articles

The Test of Maritime Sovereignty: The Establishment of the Zim National Shipping Company and the Purchase of the Kedmah, 1945–1952 (pp. 110-134)

Kobi Cohen-Hattab

Budgeting for Ultra-Orthodox Education—The Failure of Ultra-Orthodox Politics, 1996–2006 (pp. 135-162)

Hadar Lipshits

The Mizrahi Sociolect in Israel: Origins and Development (pp. 163-182)

Yehudit Henshke

Review Essay: The Theoretical Normalization of Israel in International Relations(pp. 183-189)

[Reviews  of: The Political Psychology of Israeli Prime Ministers: When Hard-Liners Opt for Peace, by Yael S. Aronoff; Why Hawks Become Doves: Shimon Peres and Foreign Policy Change in Israel by Guy Ziv]

Brent E. Sasley

 

Notes on Contributors (pp. 190-191)

Guidelines for Contributors (pp. 192-194)

Lecture: Steinfeld, Struggles over Abortion Policies in Israel

War of the Wombs: Struggles over Abortion Policies in Israel

Dr Rebecca Steinfeld (Stanford)  

4pm on Thu 19 March in A113, Samuel Alexander Building (Building 67 on the campus map, see directions).

 

ABSTRACT: This presentation examines the historical and contemporary struggles that have led to the gap between the restrictions on, and availability of, abortion in Israel. It attributes this gap to the compromise necessitated by conflicts amongst competing policymakers, motivated by opposing viewpoints and interests, over the objectives and substance of abortion policies. Opposition to abortion stems primarily from demographic anxiety relating to both the Holocaust and the Muslim Arab-Jewish fertility differential in Israel/Palestine. Support for access to abortion stems from countervailing concerns about the implications of unrestrained fertility for women’s health, family welfare and social stability, as well as ‘qualitative’ interests in reproducing healthy children. Some feminists have also resisted attempts to render women’s wombs national vessels. This presentation explores the evolution of these struggles over four distinct historical periods, and assesses their impact on women’s reproductive experiences and rights.

SPEAKER: Dr Rebecca Steinfeld is a political scientist researching the politics of reproduction and genital alteration. She completed her PhD in Politics at the University of Oxford, and is now writing her first book, Wars of the Wombs: Struggles over Reproduction in Israel (Stanford University Press, forthcoming). She is also a BBC and Arts and Humanities Research Council ‘New Generation Thinker’ and Haaretz ‘Jewish Thinker.’ She has broadcast on BBC Radio 3, 4 and 5, regularly writes in Haaretz, and has published in The Guardian, The Independent, The Jewish Chronicle, The Jewish Quarterly, and Tablet Magazine.

Further information about the CJS research seminar programme and other Jewish Studies events at the University.

New Article: Cohen, National Budget Transparency and the Israeli Health Care Policy

Cohen, Nissim. “The Power of Expertise? Politician–Bureaucrat Interactions, National Budget Transparency and the Israeli Health Care Policy.” Policy Studies 34.5-6 (2013): 638-54.

 

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01442872.2013.804174

 

Abstract

How do ministry of Finance (MOF) bureaucrats preserve their dominance in the national budget process? As we all know, MOF bureaucrats are important in politics and policy, we know much less about exactly how they play their role. Political analysis of the interaction between politicians and bureaucrats in the Israeli healthcare policy arena reveals asymmetry of information in favour of the bureaucrats at the MOF. Among others, this asymmetry is also due to a lack of transparency in the national budgeting process. While presenting the balance of power between the players in the Israeli health policy arena, we point to the MOF bureaucrats as the most dominant players – though their power is not absolute as it always seems. Quite a few indications point at ‘non-democratic’ strategies made by these bureaucrats in their interactions with the other players. The empirical findings show that alongside bureaucrats’ expertise, strategies based on concealment, manipulation in presentation of information, lack of transparency and ‘Buying’ politicians (bribe for budgets) establish the dominance of MOF’s bureaucrats in the policy arena. Under the structural conditions of centralisation, the other players tend to find alternative solutions for promoting the public policies they seek.

Cite: Razi, Treating Children in the Psycho-Hygiene Clinic in Mandate Tel Aviv

Razi, Tammy. “Immigration and its Discontents: Treating Children in the Psycho-Hygiene Clinic in Mandate Tel Aviv.” Journal of Modern Jewish Studies 11.3 (2012): 339-356.

 

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14725886.2012.722765

 

Abstract

During the 1930s and 1940s hundreds of children were diagnosed in Tel Aviv’s Psycho-Hygiene Clinic for Children as suffering mainly from organic retardation or neurosis. Those diagnosed as retarded or “educationally impaired” were sent either to special education institutions or to vocational schools and, in severe cases, to closed institutions. The children diagnosed as neurotic were usually treated individually at the clinic or in private clinics by mental health specialists and remained with their families. In most cases those diagnosed as retarded were children of Mizrahi origin whilst the children diagnosed as suffering from neurosis were of Ashkenazi origin. This paper argues that the diagnosis of so many children as problematic, as well as the relationship between their diagnosis and their ethnic origin, embodies two basic trends in yishuv society, especially prominent during the British Mandate: the labelling of the Mizrahim in general, and Mizrahi children in particular, as culturally and mentally inferior; and a high degree of intervention on the part of mental health specialists. The involvement of psychiatrists, psychoanalysts and specialists in fields such as mental hygiene and Psycho-Hygiene created a pathologization of social and economic problems, and by doing so obscured the harsh realities of immigration.

Cite: Naor, 1948 War Veterans

Naor, Moshe. "The 1948 War Veterans and Postwar Reconstruction in Israel ." Journal of Israeli History 29,1 (2010): 45-59.

Abstract

This article deals with the characteristics of postwar reconstruction in the State of Israel at the end of the 1948 war and during the early 1950s, focusing on the patterns and priorities of reconstruction of society as a whole and the rehabilitation of veteran soldiers in particular. The article addresses the social impact of the rehabilitation of the 1948 war veterans on the emerging Israeli society, including the creation of a social distinction between different sectors undergoing rehabilitation in terms of employment and housing. The article also discusses the social and political protests that accompanied the rehabilitation of the demobilized soldiers who campaigned for recognition and commemoration.

URL: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=all~content=a919915943

Keywords: Military, 1948 War, Israel: Society, Memory, Israel: Health system, Disability / Disabled / Accessibility, Veterans, Shell Shock / CSR, משה נאור