Cite: Lissovsky, From Sacred Grove to National Park: The Tale of Hurshat Tal

Lissovsky, Nurit. “From Sacred Grove to National Park: The Tale of Hurshat Tal in Israel.” Landscape Journal 32.1 (2013): 1-18.

URL: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/landscape_journal/v032/32.1.lissovsky.html

 

Abstract

This paper presents Hurshat Tal (literally Dew Grove) in the Upper Galilee as a case study for one of the fiercest disputes in the history of landscape conservation in Israel. A proposal to convert this ancient grove, a sacred site for Muslims and the sole remnant of an ancient forest of Tabor oak that once extended over the country’s northern region, into a recreation resort highlights the profound differences between the desire to “beautify” and “improve” the landscape and the commitment to preserve natural and cultural remnants of the past. This paper underlines the conflict between the scientific interest of naturalists and the interests of the planning and tourism bodies, and describes the central role played by landscape architects Lipa Yahalom and Dan Zur, who endowed the ancient grove with a new visual image and cultural identity.