New Article: Pines and Bernstein, Solving the Worldwide Emergency Department Crowding Problem – What Can We Learn from an Israeli ED?

Pines, Jesse M., and Steven L. Bernstein. “Solving the Worldwide Emergency Department Crowding Problem – What Can We Learn from an Israeli ED?” Israel Journal of Health Policy Research 4 (2015): 52.

 

URL: https://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13584-015-0049-0

 

Abstract

ED crowding is a prevalent and important issue facing hospitals in Israel and around the world, including North and South America, Europe, Australia, Asia and Africa. ED crowding is associated with poorer quality of care and poorer health outcomes, along with extended waits for care. Crowding is caused by a periodic mismatch between the supply of ED and hospital resources and the demand for patient care. In a recent article in the Israel Journal of Health Policy Research, Bashkin et al. present an Ishikawa diagram describing several factors related to longer length of stay (LOS), and higher levels of ED crowding, including management, process, environmental, human factors, and resource issues. Several solutions exist to reduce ED crowding, which involve addressing several of the issues identified by Bashkin et al. This includes reducing the demand for and variation in care, and better matching the supply of resources to demands in care in real time. However, what is needed to reduce crowding is an institutional imperative from senior leadership, implemented by engaged ED and hospital leadership with multi-disciplinary cross-unit collaboration, sufficient resources to implement effective interventions, access to data, and a sustained commitment over time. This may move the culture of a hospital to facilitate improved flow within and across units and ultimately improve quality and safety over the long-term.

 

 

New Article: Meydan et al, Managing the Shortage of Acute Care Hospital Beds

Meydan, Chanan, Ziona Haklai, Barak Gordon, Joseph Mendlovic, and Arnon Afek. “Managing the Increasing Shortage of Acute Care Hospital Beds in Israel.” Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 21.1 (2015): 79-84.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jep.12246

 

Abstract

Rationale, aims and objectives

Israel’s healthcare system has been facing increasing hospital bed shortage over the last few decades. Community-based services and shortening length of stay have helped to ease this problem, but hospitals continue to suffer from serious overload and saturation. The objective of this study is to present hospitalization trends in Israel’s internal medicine departments.

Methods

The data is based on the National Hospital Discharges database (NHDR) in the Israeli Health Ministry, pertaining to hospitalizations in all internal medicine departments nationwide between 2000 and 2012.

Results

Total yearly hospitalization days, representing healthcare burden, had increased by 4.2% during the study period, driven mainly by the most advanced age groups. The rate of total hospitalization days per 100,000 people for all the age groups has decreased by 17.6%, but the oldest patient group had a modest reduction in comparison (7.5%). The parameter of age correlated with length of stay and readmission rates, and neither decreased during the surveyed years.

Conclusions

These results demonstrated that the healthcare burden on acute internal medicine services has been reduced mostly for middle-aged populations but only modestly for elderly populations. The length of hospital stay and the readmission rates have reached and maintained a plateau in recent years, regardless of age. The findings of this study call for planning specific to elderly populations in light of changing demographics. Possible directions may include renewed emphasis on internal medicine and geriatric medicine, and efforts to shorten hospitalization time by extended utilization of multidisciplinary primary care.