ToC: Israel Studies Review 31.2 (2016)

Israel Studies Review 31.2 (2016)

Table of Contents

Articles

Reviews

  • Uri Ram, The Return of Martin Buber: National and Social Thought in Israel from Buber to the Neo-Buberians [in Hebrew].
  • Christopher L. Schilling, Emotional State Theory: Friendship and Fear in Israeli Foreign Policy.
  • Marwan Darweish and Andrew Rigby, Popular Protest in Palestine: The Uncertain Future of Unarmed Resistance.
  • Erella Grassiani, Soldiering under Occupation: Processes of Numbing among Israeli Soldiers in the Al-Aqsa Intifada.
  • Assaf Meydani, The Anatomy of Human Rights in Israel: Constitutional Rhetoric and State Practice.
  • Yael Raviv, Falafel Nation: Cuisine and the Making of National Identity in Israel.

Bulletin: Education in Israel

Books

els

internationalization

Articles

Reviews

Theses

 

Conference Program: APHA, Chicago, November 2015

Annual Meeting of the American Public Health Association, Chicago, 2015

Papers related to Israel:

 

Daoud, Nihaya. “Challenges for Maternal and Child Health Research in The Bedouin Indigenous Minority In Israel.” November 2, 2015, 8:50am.

This presentation focuses on the challenges and opportunities of maternal and child health research among Indigenous Arab Bedouin mothers in Israel.

Bedouins are Israeli citizens who have been living in the south for many decades. They are Israel’s most economically deprived minority and have poor health status. Bedouin infants have higher morbidity and mortality rates compared to their counterparts.

We conducted this study in 2007-2008 to better understand maternal experiences of infant care while drawing on social-ecological approaches to raise Bedouin mothers’ voices and inform policy and interventions.

Multiple factors embedded in Bedouins’ political and historical context complicate research, mainly land disputes with Israeli governments, changes in societal socioeconomic structure from monadic to semi-urban, and socio-cultural transitions including family structure and gender relations. Israeli governments do not recognize Bedouins as an indigenous minority, 40% of them live in legally unrecognized villages with houses that are continually threatened with demolition. These villages lack basic infrastructure including water, electricity, primary care clinics and social services. Conducting research among Bedouins requires building trust and recognizing their health and human rights while understanding their complex political, historical, and social contexts. Building on local knowledge is crucial and requires outstanding research methods. Other issues include attaining ethics approval, maintaining confidentiality, and overcoming language barriers as mothers lack basic reading and writing skills. Funding opportunities and scholarly publication requires additional effort and time. Recognizing these challenges might provide an opportunity for more advanced research among Bedouins and other indigenous populations.

 

Shapiro, Ephraim and Irit Elroy. “Mental Health Care Utilization Among the Most Traditionally Religious Jews and Muslims in Israel in an Era of Reform.” November 3, 2015, 2:30pm.

Background: Israel recently implemented mental healthcare system policy reform, with uncertain impact on utilization among subgroups. The most traditionally religious segments of Israeli society, including both Jews and Muslims,  have distinctive attitudes, behaviors and demographics, all of which can impact mental healthcare usage and the reform’s success. Prior research found some underutilization among the most religious Israelis despite universal health insurance ,  for reasons such as stigma,   yet the topic has been understudied.

Research Questions: 1) To what extent do Haredi/ultraorthodox Jews and traditional Arab Muslims in Israel seek and/or receive mental healthcare 2) Do results vary by key subgroups including religion and socioeconomic status?  3)What interventions can potentially be developed to increase use of needed mental health services among religious groups?

Methodology/Results: A random-sample survey of health utilization among all Israelis conducted in 2013 was analyzed. Outcomes included Mental healthcare utilization measures and attitudinal measures related to potential barriers. Religious group was categorized by self-report. Univariate and bivariate analyses were performed using health, religious, and socioeconomic factors. Chi-square statistics were produced. Over 2000 Israelis were surveyed including 275 Haredi/ultraorthodox  Jews and 225 traditional Muslims.  Variations were found by some but not all religious and socioeconomic subgroups. In addition, key informant interviews with religious, community and medical leaders were conducted and faith-based intervention opportunities identified

Conclusions:  Culturally-sensitive interventions can potentially be developed to increase appropriate mental health care utilization for religious Israelis. This issue is particularly timely after mental health reform when opportunities to change relevant attitudes and behaviors exist.

 

Shapira, Stav, Limor Aharonson-Daniel,Yaron Bar-Dayan, Deanna Sykes, and Bruria Adini. “Is Earthquake Preparedness a Generic Achievement? Similarities and Differences between Preparedness of Canadian and Israeli Hospital Personnel.” November 3, 2015, 4:30pm.

Background: Healthcare workers (HCW) willingness to report to work (WTR) during a disaster is essential to implementing an efficient response. A better understanding of the mechanisms underlying this matter may contribute to reduced absenteeism in future disasters. Assessing preparedness and WTR in an earthquake scenario, in different social contexts and preparedness approaches (Canada and Israel) may shed light on the complexity of these issues.

Objectives: 1) To assess knowledge, perceptions, attitudes and WTR of HCW in Canada and Israel concerning earthquakes and 2) To evaluate the relationship between these factors and WTR.

Methods: A validated questionnaire including questions about demographic characteristics, knowledge, perceptions, attitudes and WTR in an earthquake scenario was distributed in two tertiary care hospitals located in risk regions, to a random sample of 131 Israeli and 381 Canadian HCW.

Results: Knowledge, perceptions of efficacy, as well as WTR were generally higher among Israeli HCWs. ‘Concern for family’s well-being’ and ‘professional commitment to care’ were reported by the largest proportion of HCW as factors that might influence WTR. Significant predictors of WTR amongst both Israeli and Canadian HCW were the belief that ‘colleagues will also report to work’ and ‘professional commitment’.

Conclusions: Significant differences were found in levels of knowledge, perceptions, attitudes and WTR in an earthquake scenario between Israeli and Canadian HCW. Social and professional solidarity seems to be cross-cultural factors that mitigate other potential barriers to WTR. This may help formulate new methods of improving hospital personnel preparedness to future events.

 

Shapiro, Ephraim and Rachel Nisanholtz. “Community Nurses and Chronic Disease in Israel, the United States, and the United Kingdom: A Comparative Analysis.” November 4, 2015, 11:00am.

Background: The growing worldwide trend of chronic disease harms not only the public’s health but increases costs. Public health and other community nurses can play important roles in its prevention and control. These nurses can play vital roles in advancing national health system objectives. However, despite this there has been inadequate comparative study of community nurses’ role in preventing and controlling chronic disease.

Objectives: 1)What roles do public health and other community nurses play for  chronic disease prevention and control? 2)What trends and related challenges exist for these nurses in terms of chronic disease prevention and control? 3)How do these nurses’ roles, trends and challenges vary across Israel, the U.S., and the U.K and what lessons can be learned?

Methodology:  Key informant interviews and a comprehensive literature review were performed and themes related to the objectives analyzed. An average of 10 interviews was performed among nursing leaders and/or academic experts in each of the three countries.

Key Findings/Conclusions: The role of nurses in non-hospital settings has grown rapidly; further growth is expected to occur, with variations by type of nurse. They have a multiplicity of roles and can reach a wide variety of groups. There are important implications for reducing health disparities as nurses can play important roles in monitoring social determinants. While there is much overlap, important differences exist between community nurses in different settings; countries can learn from each other’s successes and challenges although contextual differences such as cultural, institutional, and policy and differences need to be understood.

ToC: Israel Studies Review 29.2 (2014): New Age Culture in Israel

Guest Editors’ Introduction: New Age Culture in Israel
pp. 1-16
Authors: Werczberger, Rachel; Huss, Boaz

Articles

This article focuses on the concept of identity by juxtaposing New Age philosophy and nationalism in the Israeli context. Based on my qualitative research, I deconstruct the Israeli New Age discourse on ethno-national identity and expose two approaches within this discourse. The more common one is the belief held by most Israelis, according to which ethno-national identity is a fundamental component of one’s self. A second and much less prevalent view resembles New Age ideology outside Israel and conceives of ethno-national identities as a false social concept that separate people rather than unite them. My findings highlight the limits of New Age ideology as an alternative to the hegemonic culture in Israel. The difficulty that Israeli New Agers find in divorcing hegemonic conceptualizations demonstrates the centrality and power of ethno-national identity in Israel.
In this article I examine eschatological beliefs and practices among channels in Israel and abroad, and show that they demonstrate an avoidance of traditional, group-oriented political action, and an embrace of alternative, spiritual action performed individually. This is linked to Israel’s shift to a neo-liberal economy and culture in the last few decades, where self-accountability has become the norm. Channeling teaches an extreme version of self-divinity, claiming that a person creates all aspects of his or her life and objecting to outside authority and regulation. It believes in a coming of a New Age of light and that the means to achieve it are personal quests for individual empowerment, which are anticipated to affect the whole world via the “virtual aggregate group,” an energetic reservoir that replaces the traditional group. Channels are engaged in alternative political action, attempting to change the world by virtually pooling spiritual resources.
This article charts the recent development of Modern Paganism in Israel (1999–2012) and analyzes the discourse maintained by Israeli modern-day Pagans when discussing questions of organization and of religious-political rights. As such it deals with the complexities of identifying oneself as a (Jewish-born) Pagan in Israel, the nation state of the Jewish people. I argue that although Israeli Pagans may employ a community-building discourse, they constantly fear the perceived negative consequences of public exposure. They see the bond between (Jewish) religion and the state in Israel as a main factor in the intolerance and even persecution that they expect from the government and from Haredim (“ultra-Orthodox” Jews). The result of this discourse during the first ten years or so of the presence of Modern Paganism in Israel can be seen through the metaphor of a dance, in which participants advance two steps, only to retreat one.
The notion of consciousness change as a political concept has re-emerged as a central issue in recent Israeli political discourse in diverse and seemingly remote groups. The following is a study of some of the contexts and implications of according primacy to consciousness change in political thought, through the tensions between the highly individualistic character of this discourse and its collective language and aims. I focus on one study case, Rabbi Yitzchak Ginsburgh, a key figure in both extreme settler groups and current New Age Hasidic revival. Analyzing his political writings, I explore his notion of consciousness as the true place of politics. Finally, I return to the question of the context in which Rabbi Ginsburgh’s binding of the political to consciousness should be read, and propose liberal individualism, and the direct line it draws between the individual’s consciousness and that of the state, as an alternative hermeneutical perspective.
The quest for personal and inner spiritual transformation and development is prevalent among spiritual seekers today and constitutes a major characteristic of contemporary spirituality and the New Age phenomenon. Religious leaders of the Bratslav community endeavor to satisfy this need by presenting adjusted versions of hitbodedut meditation, a practice that emphasizes solitary and personal connection with the divine. As is shown by two typical examples, popular Bratslav teachers today take full advantage of the opportunity to infuse the hitbodedut with elements not found in Rabbi Nachman’s teachings and to dispense with some elements that were. The article addresses the socio-political rationale at the root of these teachers’ novel interpretation of Bratslav hitbodedut and the ways they attempt to deal with the complications that arise out of their work.
This article describes the new “field” of Sufi ideas and practices in Israeli Jewish society and analyzes the mutual relations between new Western Sufi influences and traditional Sufi orders of the Middle East. It focuses on the role of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict in this evolving field. While the current rise of interest in spirituality is often described as emphasizing an apolitical approach, the evolving Sufi field in Israel is an example of a field that cannot detach itself from the overarching conflict. Moreover, efforts are made by some of the actors in this field to present Sufism as representing a different Islam and, hence, as a potential bridge between the rival parties. These approaches, as this article shows, have their own complexities and influences on the emerging Sufi field in Israel.
Review Essay

Book Reviews

Book Reviews
pp. 153-170

Daniel Bar-Tal and Izhak Schnell, eds., The Impacts of Lasting Occupation: Lessons from Israeli Society

Review by Ned Lazarus

Alan Craig, International Legitimacy and the Politics of Security: The Strategic Deployment of Lawyers in the Israeli Military

Review by Ariel L. Bendor

Joel S. Migdal, Shifting Sands: The United States in the Middle East

Review by Aharon Klieman

Miriam Fendius Elman, Oded Haklai, and Hendrik Spruyt, eds., Democracy and Conflict Resolution: The Dilemmas of Israel’s Peacemaking

Review by Jay Rothman

Eyal Levin, Ethos Clash in Israeli Society

Review by Gabriel Ben-Dor

Danielle Gurevitch, Elana Gomel, and Rani Graff, eds., With Both Feet on the Clouds: Fantasy in Israeli Literature

Review by Ari Ofengenden

ToC: Israel Studies 19.3 (2014)

Israel Studies 19.3 (2014): Table of Contents

New Article: Englander, The Image of the Male Body in Lithuanian Ultra-Orthodox Thought in Israel and Corresponding Strategies for Forging an A-feminine Public Sphere

Englander, Yakir. “The Image of the Male Body in Lithuanian Ultra-Orthodox Thought in Israel and Corresponding Strategies for Forging an A-feminine Public Sphere.” Journal of Contemporary Religion 29.3 (2014): 457-70.

 

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13537903.2014.945729

 

 

Abstract

This article deals with the increasingly severe attitude in Jewish Ultra-Orthodox society in the State of Israel regarding the relationship between the sexes. I seek to trace the philosophical roots of this attitude, as a product of existential thinking within the male contingent of the Ultra-Orthodox (Lithuanian) world itself, and I propose that the growing separation between the sexes is a direct result of rabbinic efforts to re-structure this world from within. The image of the Ultra-Orthodox public sphere is considered to be an exact reflection of the male individual and the way of life that is required of him. Ultra-Orthodox thought requires men to stop the flow of life, causing a ‘disconnect’ between the reflective self and the world in which the self exists as an object without reflexivity. According to Ultra-Orthodox thought, inability and failure to live all of life as reflective are linked to the human person as an ‘embodied being’. I explain the Ultra-Orthodox solution to the ‘problem of the body’ and how it influences the structure of the yeshiva as a ‘safe haven’. This mode of dealing with the body entails the exclusion of femininity from male life in the yeshiva context and is also increasingly reflected in the public domain. In recent years, Ultra-Orthodox rabbis have designed the public sphere using the model of the yeshiva as a space that is a-feminine. This is supported by readings from new Ultra-Orthodox Musar writings, directed to men, which deal with women’s sexuality and create a new definition of modesty.

ToC: Israel Studies 19.2 (2014)

[ToC from Project Muse; content also available at JStor: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2979/israelstudies.19.issue-2]

Israel Studies

Volume 19, Number 2, Summer 2014

Table of Contents

Special Issue: Zionism in the 21st Century

Editors: Ilan Troen and Donna Robinson Divine

 

Introduction: (Special issue, Israel Studies, 19.2)

pp. v-xi

Ilan Troen, Donna Robinson Divine

Articles: Zionist Theory

Cultural Zionism Today

pp. 1-14

Allan Arkush

Bi-Nationalist Visions for the Construction and Dissolution of the State of Israel

pp. 15-34

Rachel Fish

Culture: Literature and Music

Nostalgic Soundscapes: The Future of Israel’s Sonic Past

pp. 35-50

Edwin Seroussi

Cultural Orientations and Dilemmas

Remember? Forget? What to Remember? What to Forget?

pp. 51-69

Tuvia Friling

The Kibbutz in Immigration Narratives of Bourgeois Iraqi and Polish Jews Who Immigrated to Israel in the 1950s

pp. 70-93

Aziza Khazzoom

Politics and Law

Zionism and the Politics of Authenticity

pp. 94-110

Donna Robinson Divine

Law in Light of Zionism: A Comparative View

pp. 111-132

Suzanne Last Stone

Economics and Land

Some Perspectives on the Israeli Economy: Stocktaking and Looking Ahead

pp. 133-161

Jacob Metzer

Competing Concepts of Land in Eretz Israel

pp. 162-186

Ilan Troen, Shay Rabineau

Israel’s Relationship with Its Neighbors and the Palestinian Arab Citizens

The Arab Minority in Israel: Reconsidering the “1948 Paradigm”

pp. 187-217

Elie Rekhess

Israel’s Place in a Changing Regional Order (1948–2013)

pp. 218-238

Asher Susser

Religion and Society

Messianism and Politics: The Ideological Transformation of Religious Zionism

pp. 239-263

Eliezer Don-Yehiya

The Ambivalent Haredi Jew

pp. 264-293

Yoel Finkelman

Contributors

pp. 294-296

New Article: Taragin-Zeller, Modesty among Female Ultra-Orthodox Teenagers in Israel

Taragin-Zeller, Lea. “Modesty for Heaven’s Sake: Authority and Creativity among Female Ultra-Orthodox Teenagers in Israel.” Nashim 26 (2014): 75-96.

 

URL: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/nashim/v026/26.taragin-zeller.html

 

Abstract

The ethnographic research that I conducted at a Bais Yaakov seminary in Jerusalem demonstrates how ultra-Orthodox female teachers and their teenage pupils structure an ideology of modesty through the reinterpretation of canonical texts on modesty. In this study, I show that modesty is a creative sphere informed by two trends: the adoption of modern patterns of behavior, and religious innovation. The exegesis these women give to the texts upon which they base their practice redefines the field of modesty in two primary ways: (1) It transforms modesty from a rigid halachic dictate into a dynamic feminine “mission” that is connected to the sphere of virtues; and (2) it replaces the socio-masculine discourse upon which this observance is based with a divine imperative. This phenomenon bears witness to a shift in the types of authority that these ultra-Orthodox teenage girls are willing to accept, since the only justification they accept for their modesty practices is that of personal devotion to God.

Conference Program: Jewish Languages and Contemporary Hebrew

Conference on Jewish Languages and Contemporary Hebrew

University of Haifa

Sunday, 29 December 2013

For program (in Hebrew), click here.

ToC: Journal of Israeli History 32,1 (2013)

 

 

Special Issue: House as Home in Israeli Culture

Articles

Introduction

Orit Rozin
pages 1-5

View full textDownload full text

Free access

  • DOI:10.1080/13531042.2013.768026

 

Separate spheres, intertwined spheres: Home, work, and family among Jewish women business owners in the Yishuv

Talia Pfefferman
pages 7-28

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  • DOI:10.1080/13531042.2013.768028

 

Just ring twice: Law and society under the rent control regime in Israel, 1948–1954

Maya Mark
pages 29-50

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  • DOI:10.1080/13531042.2013.768029

 

The evolution of the inner courtyard in Israel: A reflection of the relationship between the Western modernist hegemony and the Mediterranean environment

Hadas Shadar
pages 51-74

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  • DOI:10.1080/13531042.2013.768031

 

The P6 Group and critical landscape photography in Israel

Jochai Rosen
pages 75-85

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  • DOI:10.1080/13531042.2013.768033

 

Visions of identity: Pictures of rabbis in Haredi (ultra-Orthodox) private homes in Israel

Nissim Leon
pages 87-108

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  • DOI:10.1080/13531042.2013.768035

 

Soft power: The meaning of home for Gush Emunim settlers

Michael Feige
pages 109-126

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  • DOI:10.1080/13531042.2013.768041

 

Heading home: The domestication of Israeli children’s literature in the 1960s as reflected in Am Oved’s Shafan ha-sofer series

Yael Darr
pages 127-139

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  • DOI:10.1080/13531042.2013.768042

House and home: A semantic stroll through metaphors and symbols

Tamar Sovran
pages 141-156

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  • DOI:10.1080/13531042.2013.768044

Exhibition: Orthodox in Israel (photography)

7 PM

Wednesday, October 26, 2011

Hillel at UCLA

Michael Cohen   

(Photographer)

Orthodox in Israel

An Exhibit Opening

A secular kibbutznik, Mr. Cohen has embarked on a photographic journey to explore the way of life of Orthodox Jewish communities in Israel. The images, printed on canvas, depict the holiday celebrations, weddings, prayer and play of a world which usually remains hidden from those who are not part of it.

Sponsored by the

Dortort Center for Creativity in the Arts at UCLA Hillel
Cosponsored by the
UCLA Center for Jewish Studies

To RSVP, visit: www.uclahillel.org/ArtOpeningOctober_2011

For questions, call: (310) 208-3081 ext. 108

Cite: Frattina, Les femmes du Mur des Lamentations

Frattina, Katy Sakina. "Les femmes du Mur des Lamentations." Canadian Journal of Women and the Law 21,2 (2009): 299-314.

Abstract

In October 2003, the Israeli Supreme Court reversed its earlier decision to uphold the right for women to pray out loud while wearing prayer shawls at the Western Wall. The court prohibited the women to pray in a manner contrary to traditional Jewish orthodox rites and ordered the state of Israel to provide an alternate, secure site for them. This case challenges us to think about the interplay between law and diversity-related claims that are made at the nexus of, and intersections between, culture, religion, and gender at the state and community level.

En octobre 2003, la Cour suprême israélienne est revenue sur sa décision d’autoriser les femmes à prier à voix haute et en portant des châles de prière au Mur des Lamentations. La Cour a condamné la prière qui est contraire aux traditions et aux pratiques du judaïsme orthodoxe. Elle a également ordonné à l’État d’Israël de proposer un autre lieu de prières sécuritaire pour les femmes. Cette affaire permet de nous pencher plus en avant sur les interactions entre le droit et la diversité sociale dans le domaine de la culture, de la religion et des questions de genre au niveau de l’État et de la communauté.

URL: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/canadian_journal_of_women_and_the_law/summary/v021/21.2.frattina.html

Keywords: Israel: Religion, Gender, Ultra-Orthodox / Haredi, Israel: Law, Reform Judaism, Jeruslaem, Kotel / Wailing Wall