New Article: An Internet-Based Empowerment Project in Palestine and Israel

Benedikter, Roland and Davide Ziveri. “The Global Imaginary, New Media and Sociopolitical Innovation in the Periphery: The Practical Case of an Internet-Based Empowerment Project in Palestine and Israel.” Continuum 28.4 (2014): 439-53.

 

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10304312.2013.772113

 

Abstract

This paper is concerned with a description of the way in which a particular group of marginalized peoples in Palestine are using digital network technologies as part of a campaign of non-violent resistance to their conditions. It is an engaging story of what is a case study in the way communications technologies are becoming part of broader struggles for liberation not just in the ‘connected’ centres, but also in more isolated areas. The aims of the international empowerment project called ‘Nonviolence 2.0’ are to serve as a forum for developing peace, understanding and tolerance between groups engaged in a long and ongoing conflict. What is significant in it is the use of personal narratives that humanize both sides of the conflict, as well as of mobile technologies to record and reflect conflict by general citizens. The paper deploys some theoretical constructs (such as imagination actions) to frame its – purposefully in large parts rather descriptive than analytic – presentation of this ongoing project.

New Article: Gould, Israel’s Apartheid Wall in an Age of Globalization

Gould, Rebecca. “The Materiality of Resistance. Israel’s Apartheid Wall in an Age of Globalization.” Social Text 32.1 (2014): 1-21.

 

URL: http://socialtext.dukejournals.org/content/32/1_118/1.short

 

Abstract

This essay examines the graffiti that covers the portion of the West Bank’s segregation wall that traverses Bethlehem. That the majority of the representations covering the wall are intended for international rather than local consumption complicates the prevalent tendency in the literature on this wall to align these representations homogenously with resistance. More than resisting a specific regime, many of these images enter into global conversations about the circulation of power. Images of resistance scripted and consumed by those who observe suffering from afar are juxtaposed to Palestinian engagements with the wall, which is frequently represented allegorically or not represented at all.

Cite: Marom and Yacobi, Cultural Diversity Policy in Tel Aviv

Marom, Nathan & Haim Yacobi. “‘Culture Capital for All’? Cultural Diversity Policy in Tel Aviv and its Limits.” Mediterranean Politics 18.1 (2013): 60-77.

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13629395.2012.745709

Abstract

This article critically analyses cultural diversity policy in Tel Aviv–Jaffa in relation to non-Jewish labour migrant communities and to Palestinian citizens of Israel residing in Jaffa. It focuses on recent incorporation of cultural diversity into city policy in its ‘City Vision’ and ‘Global City’ initiatives and in three specific areas (festivities, libraries and museum of city history). The article argues that despite the introduction and initial institutionalization of cultural diversity in Tel Aviv, there are unresolved contradictions when city policies encounter the ethnocratic boundaries set by Israel’s policies.

Cite: Federbush and Muys, Israel and Water: Global Economic Growth and Diplomatic Relations

Federbush, Marjorie S. and Jerome C. Muys. “Israel and Water-(What’s Next for the) ‘Turn around Nation’: How Israel’s Leadership in Advanced Water Technologies Can Enhance Global Economic Growth and Diplomatic Relations.” American Foreign Policy Interests 34.6 (2012): 309-21.

 

URL: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/routledg/uafp/2012/00000034/00000006/art00004

 

Abstract

In less than a decade, Israel has turned around from a perennially water-stressed society, facing serious challenges from climate change, drought, and depletion of water resources, to a technologically savvy innovator of advanced water technologies and management techniques. Having developed the systems, strategies, and technologies to successfully address its own water shortages, Israel now has moved aggressively to engage with other countries as they struggle with their own water deficits. Not only are developing economies seeking access to Israel’s technological know-how in the areas of water technology and management, but policy makers and the business community in developed countries have also taken note. In short, Israel has become a model of economic growth under adverse circumstances. In the process, Israel is increasingly welcomed as a member of the community of nations because of its efforts to promote technology transfer and offer humanitarian assistance to countries facing similar problems. By reaching out to the international community on water-related issues, Israel is creating mechanisms for both global economic growth and diplomatic gains.