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New Book: Rosenfeld, Deciphering the New Antisemitism

Rosenfeld, Alvin H., ed. Deciphering the New Antisemitism. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2015.

new antisemitism

Deciphering the New Antisemitism addresses the increasing prevalence of antisemitism on a global scale. Antisemitism takes on various forms in all parts of the world, and the essays in this wide-ranging volume deal with many of them: European antisemitism, antisemitism and Islamophobia, antisemitism and anti-Zionism, and efforts to demonize and delegitimize Israel. Contributors are an international group of scholars who clarify the cultural, intellectual, political, and religious conditions that give rise to antisemitic words and deeds. These landmark essays are noteworthy for their timeliness and ability to grapple effectively with the serious issues at hand.

 

Table of Contents

Introduction Alvin H. Rosenfeld

Part I. Defining and Assessing Antisemitism
1. Antisemitism and Islamophobia: The Inversion of the Debt – Pascal Bruckner
2. The Ideology of the New Antisemitism – Kenneth L. Marcus
3. A Framework for Assessing Antisemitism: Three Case Studies (Dieudonné, Erdoğan, and Hamas) – Günther Jikeli
4. Virtuous Antisemitism – Elhanan Yakira


Part II. Intellectual and Ideological Contexts
5. Historicizing the Transhistorical: Apostasy and the Dialectic of Jew-Hatred – Doron Ben-Atar
6. Literary Theory and the Delegitimization of Israel – Jean Axelrad Cahan
7. Good News from France: There Is No New Antisemitism – Bruno Chaouat
8. Anti-Zionism and the Anarchist Tradition – Eirik Eiglad
9. Antisemitism and the Radical Catholic Traditionalist Movement – Mark Weitzman

Part III. Holocaust Denial, Evasion, Minimization
10. The Uniqueness Debate Revisited – Bernard Harrison
11. Denial, Evasion, and Anti-Historical Antisemitism: The Continuing Assault on Memory – David Patterson
12. Generational Changes in the Holocaust Denial Movement in the United States – Aryeh Tuchman


Part IV. Regional Manifestations
13. From Occupation to Occupy: Antisemitism and the Contemporary Left in the United States – Sina Arnold
14. The EU’s Responses to Contemporary Antisemitism: A Shell Game – R. Amy Elman
15. Anti-Israeli Boycotts: European and International Human Rights Law Perspectives – Aleksandra Gliszczynska-Grabias
16. Delegitimizing Israel in Germany and Austria: Past Politics, the Iranian Threat, and Post-national Anti-Zionism – Stephan Grigat
17. Antisemitism and Antiurbanism, Past and Present: Empirical and Theoretical Approaches – Bodo Kahmann
18. Tehran’s Efforts to Mobilize Antisemitism: The Global Impact – Matthias Küntzel

List of Contributors
Index

ALVIN H. ROSENFELD holds the Irving M. Glazer Chair in Jewish Studies and is Professor of English and Founding Director of the Institute for the Study of Contemporary Antisemitism at Indiana University Bloomington. He is editor of Resurgent Antisemitism: Global Perspectives (IUP, 2013) and author of The End of the Holocaust (IUP, 2011), among other books.

 

New Article: Bernstein, Russian Food Stores and Their Meaning in Germany and Israel

Bernstein, Julia. “Russian Food Stores and Their Meaning for Jewish Migrants in Germany and Israel. Honor and ‘Nostalgia’.” In Being Jewish in 21st-Century Germany (ed. Olaf Glöckner and Haim Fireberg; Berlin: de Gruyter, 2015): 81-102.

 

9783110350159

Abstract

This article deals with the process of integration into a new society through preservation of food habits from the former ‘home-land.’ The text is based on a comparative study that was conducted in Germany and Israel. Sticking to food habit, concludes Bernstein “in the migration process obviously contribute to ‘living memories,’ yet they do much more: They also ‘make a place’ for a virtual home that preserves social status and stabilizes the self-esteem of customers. Food consumption in the migration process seems to promote contouring collective ‘we’-identities.”

 

 

New Article: Yair, The Germans: Cultural Trauma and the Israeli Habitus

Yair, Gad. “The Germans: Cultural Trauma and the Israeli Habitus.” American Journal of Cultural Sociology 3.2 (2015): 254-79.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/ajcs.2015.2

 

Abstract

This article reports results from a qualitative study of Israelis living in Germany, focusing on their traumatized national habitus. The study is based on 80 in-depth interviews and on replies of more than 100 respondents to an online questionnaire. The present article focuses on one specific aspect of the Israeli traumatized habitus: ‘the wounded eye and the scratched ear’. Specifically, it explores the ways by which the trauma of the Holocaust is inscribed in Israeli senses. It details how respondents’ eyes, ears and thoughts are activated by German mundane episodes, linking day-to-day experiences to the trauma of the Holocaust. Trains, suspect on-boarding Israelis, might end up in Auschwitz; snow brings up associations of the death marches; old people are perceived as Gestapo officers; and contemporary child-rearing practices ‘explain’ to Israelis the obedience and collaboration of ordinary Germans with the Third Reich. Using thick description from the interviews I expose the suspicious Israeli habitus – which always looks for ‘signs’ that might explain what happened in Germany 80 years ago.

 
 
 
 

New Article: Rosenberg, Is Israel Good for the Diaspora?

Rosenberg, Göran. “Is Israel Good for the Diaspora? Jewish Quarterly 62.2 (2015): 28-34.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0449010X.2015.1051705

 

Excerpt

So, where does the Jewish Diaspora go from here? On the one hand, I believe we might expect a further widening of the gap between Zion in its present-day nationalistic manifestation, and the Jewish Diaspora as a manifestation of religious pluralism and spiritual universalism. The Jewish Diaspora will then increasingly evolve into exilic community like most others, held together by a common ancestry and history, nourished by a common fear of antisemitism and a common affinity with a not-so-common nation-state.
On the other hand, we might expect—or in my case at least hope for—a revival of that strand of Judaism that Marcus Ehrenpreis was dreaming of in March of 1945, reconnecting in new ways and under wholly new circumstances, to the spiritual heritage of the Jewish Diaspora, to make the texts and tenets of Judaism known and relevant to new generations of Jews and non-Jews alike, to make the Jewish Diaspora into something more than a passive affiliate to Zion. This is to say, to find a new path for Judaism between Zion and Diaspora. A modest attempt is actually being made in Sweden, of all places, where in 2000, The European Institute for Jewish Studies, Paideia, was founded with support from the Swedish government. At Paideia, some twenty students from all over Europe—Jews and non-Jews alike—spend a year of study in close and critical contact with Jewish texts and text traditions (full disclosure, I am a proud board member). This is how Paideia has formulated its mission:

Dedicated to the revival of Jewish culture in Europe, Paideia educates leaders for Europe—academicians, artists and community activists—towards fluency in the Jewish textual sources that have served as the wellsprings of Jewish civilization. In renewing interpretation of Jewish text, Paideia is reviving a European Jewish voice long silenced by Communism and post-Holocaust trauma—a voice that can contribute to a culturally rich and pluralistic Europe
It is perhaps no coincidence that in 2011, a link was established between Paideia and the Hochschule für Jüdische Studien in Heidelberg, creating a joint Master’s program in Jewish Civilizations, contributing “towards a European Jewish culture that is a dynamic, open and inclusive learning community, in conversation both with the Jewish textual sources and with society.”

 

ToC: Naharaim 8,2 (2014)

Naharaim volume 8, issue 2 (2014)

 

Bibliography: Leo Baeck Institute Yearbook bibliography on Zionism and Israel (2014)

Bibliography: Zionism and Israel. Published in the Leo Baeck Institute Yearbook 59 (2014): 460-466.

57203. Alroey, Gur: “Zionism without Zion”? Territorialist Ideology and the Zionist Movement, 1882–1956. [In]: Jewish Social Studies, Vol. 18(1), 2013. Pp. 1–32

57204. Al-Salim, Farid: Key to three crises: The Ha’avara Agreement, Jewish immigration, and the Peel Plan of Partition of Palestine. [In]: Journal of South Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, Vol. 37(1), 2013. Pp. 86–102

57205. Armborst-Weihs, Kerstin: The Formation of the Jewish National Movement Through Transnational Exchange: Zionism in Europe up to the First World War. [In]: Europäische Geschichte Online. http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0159–2011080820 (07.08.2014)

57206. Ashkenazi, Ofer: The Biramschule in Context – The »German« Influence on Jewish Body Culture in Mandate Palestine. [In]: Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte, Vol. 41, 2013 (Issue title: Deutsche(s) in Palästina und Israel. Alltag, Kultur, Politik. Ed. by José Brunner). Pp. 17–39

57207. Behar, Moshe; Benite, Zvi Ben-Dor (eds.): Modern Middle Eastern Jewish Thought: Writings on Identity, Politics, and Culture, 1893–1958. Waltham, MA: Brandeis University Press, 2013. XXXIX, 257 pp., ISBN 978-1-58465-884-9 / 978-1-58465-885-6 [Reviewed by: Orit Bashkin, on: https://www.h-net.org/reviews/showrev.php?id=41227 (22.05.2014). Incl. i. a.: European Zionism and the Arabs and Jews in Palestine]

57208. Ben-Ari, Nitsa: Hebrew Translations of German Classics – Attraction and Aversion. [In]: Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte, Vol. 41, 2013 (Issue title: Deutsche(s) in Palästina und Israel. Alltag, Kultur, Politik. Ed. by José Brunner). Pp. 129–142

57209. BERGMANN, ERNST DAVID. Orchin, Milton; Fenichel, Henry; Jensen, William B.: Scientist in the Service of Israel. The Life and Times of Ernst David Bergmann (1903–1975). Jerusalem: Hebrew University Magnes Press, 2011. XVIII, 374 pp., ISBN 978-965-493-580-7 [“This is the first book-length study of the life and career of the Israeli chemist Ernst David Bergmann. It traces his birth and education in Germany; his decision, after the rise of Hitler, to immigrate to Palestine rather than to accept a position at Oxford; and his intimate 18-year association with Chaim Weizmann – not only as his closest scientific associate but also as Scientific Director of both the Sieff Institute and of the Weizmann Institute …”]

57210. BERGNER, ELISABETH. Feinberg, Anat: »Von Gott begnadete Schauspielerin«: Elisabeth Bergner in Israel. [In]: Aschkenas, Vol. 21(1–2) (2011), 2013. Pp. 229–246

57211. BIRNBAUM, NATHAN. Olson, Jess: Nathan Birnbaum and Jewish Modernity: Architect of Zionism, Yiddishism, and Orthodoxy. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2013, 408 pp. (Stanford Studies in Jewish History and Culture), ISBN 978-0-8047-7873-2 [Reviewed by: Kerstin Armborst-Weihs, in: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/rezension.html (06.05.2014)]

––. BUBER, MARTIN. Wolf, Siegbert: Martin Bubers Konzeption der Binationalität (2012). See No. 55784

––. Buber, Martin: Zwei Völker in Palästina (1947). See No. 55784

57212. DUBNOW, SIMON. Jilek, Grit: Nation ohne Territorium. Über die Organisierung der jüdischen Diaspora bei Simon Dubnow. Baden-Baden: Nomos, 2013. 524 pp. (Schriftenreihe der Sektion Politische Theorien und Ideengeschichte in der Deutschen Vereinigung für Politische Wissenschaft, Vol. 24), ISBN 978-3-8329-7738-2

57213. Edelmann-Ohler, Eva: Sprache des Krieges. Deutungen des Ersten Weltkriegs in zionistischer Publizistik und Literatur (1914–1918). Zürich: ETH Zürich, 2013. 306 pp., illus. (ETH Zürich Diss. No. 20986)

57214. Eiff, Hansjörg: Die jüdische Heimstätte in Palästina in der Außenpolitik der Weimarer Republik. [In]: Zeitschrift für Geschichtswissenschaft, Vol. 61(12), 2013. Pp. 1005–1028

57215. Gechtman, Roni: Nationalising the Bund? Zionist historiography and the Jewish labour movement. [In]: East European Jewish Affairs, Vol. 43(3), 2013. Pp. 249–264 [Abstract: This article examines the academic historiography on the Jewish Workers’ Bund produced by Israeli and Zionist scholars. While the contribution of Israeli scholars to the historiography on the Bund has been significant in both quantity and quality, their works have had to grapple with the tension between the goals of Zionist historiography and the Bund’s political and ideological commitments, namely the party’s radical opposition to nationalism in general and to Zionism in particular. To various degrees, Israeli scholars sought to “nationalise” the Yiddish-speaking labour movement in Eastern Europe and incorporate it into a coherent narrative of the Jews’ past as an “organic” nation. As a result of their authors’ ideological and methodological preconceptions, and by portraying it as a nationalist movement, these works often misrepresent the Bund’s ideas, policies and activities.]

––. Graur, Mina: Anarchismus und Zionismus. Die Debatte über den jüdischen Nationalismus (2008). See No. 55784

57216. Grill, Tobias: Antizionistische jüdische Bewegungen. [In]: Europäische Geschichte Online. http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0159–2011081886 (07.08.2014)

57217. GRONEMANN, SAMMY. Kühne, Jan: “Wer ist wer?!”. Sammy Gronemanns Jakob und Christian. [In]: PaRDeS. Zeitschrift der Vereinigung für Jüdische Studien, Vol. 19, 2013 (Issue title: Galut Sepharad in Aschkenas: Sepharden im deutschsprachigen Kulturraum). Pp. 191–206 [http://opus.kobv.de/ubp/volltexte/2013/6527/ (04.09.2013)]

57218. Grüner, Frank; Hohler, Susanne: Offener Brief der zionistischen Jugendorganisation Betar an den Nationalrat der Jüdischen Gemeinden im Fernen Osten vom 25. Januar 1939. [In]: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/articles.html#artikel308

57219. Harpaz, Nathan: Zionist Architecture and Town Planning: The Building of Tel Aviv (1919–1929). West Lafayette, IN: Purdue University Press, 2013. xi, 277 pp., illus., ISBN 9781557536730

57220. Hermann, Tamar S.: Zionism and Palestinian Nationalism: Possibilities of Recognition. [In]: Israel Studies, Vol. 18(2), 2013 (Special Issue: Shared Narratives – A Palestinian-Israeli Dialogue). Pp. 133–147

57221. Herrmann, Manja: “[B]eide zu einem harmonischen Ganzen verschmolzen”: Particularism, Universalism, and the Hybrid Jewish Nation in Early German Zionist Discourse. [In]: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/articles.html#artikel323

––. HERZL, THEODOR. Ben-Ami: Herzl and the First Congress. See No. 56248

57222. HESS, MOSES; PINSKER, LEON; RÜLF, MORITZ. Schoeps, Julius H.: Pioneers of Zionism: Hess, Pinsker, Rülf. Messianism, Settlement Policy, and the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict. Translated by Margaret-Ann Schellenberg. Berlin [et al.]: de Gruyter, 2013. 158 pp., illus., ISBN 978-3-11-031458-8 [Reviewed by: Philipp von Wussow, in: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/rezension.html (06.05.2014)]

––. Hessing, Jakob: Germanistik in Israel. Aspekte einer Trauerarbeit. See No. 57755

57223. Jessen, Caroline: Bücher als Dinge. Funktionen emigrierter Bücher und Büchersammlungen für deutsch-jüdische Einwanderer in Palästina/Israel nach 1933 aus Perspektive der Kanonforschung. [In]: Exilforschung, Vol. 29, 2011. Pp. 12–27

57224. Jessen, Caroline: Das problematische Bild der geretteten Kultur – Büchersammlungen deutsch-jüdischer Einwanderer in Israel. [In]: Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte, Vol. 41, 2013 (Issue title: Deutsche(s) in Palästina und Israel. Alltag, Kultur, Politik. Ed. by José Brunner). Pp. 179

57225. Jessen, Caroline: Spuren deutsch-jüdischer Geschichte. Erschließung und Erforschung von Nachlässen und Sammlungen in Israel. [In]: Der Archivar, Vol. 66(3), 2013. Pp. 328–331

57226. Kraft, Christian: Die Synagogen Binjan Zion und Chorew – Der Konflikt zweier deutscher Einwanderergemeinden in Jerusalem. [In]: Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte, Vol. 41, 2013 (Issue title: Deutsche(s) in Palästina und Israel. Alltag, Kultur, Politik. Ed. by José Brunner). Pp. 97–126

57227. Kühne, Jan: Das Ende einer jüdischen Welttournee – Sammy Gronemann und die zionistische »Rückkehr in die Geschichte«. [In]: Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte, Vol. 41, 2013 (Issue title: Deutsche(s) in Palästina und Israel. Alltag, Kultur, Politik. Ed. by José Brunner). Pp. 143–160

57228. LASKER-SCHÜLER, ELSE; WILHELM, KURT. Kohler, George Y.: »Platzmachen für Gott« – Else Lasker-Schüler, Rabbiner Kurt Wilhelm und der religiöse Liberalismus in Palästina. [In]: Aschkenas, Vol. 21(1–2) (2011), 2013. Pp. 179–199

57229. Liebermann, Guido: La psychanalyse en Palestine 1918–1948. Aux origines du mouvement analytique israélien. Préface de Elisabeth Roudinesco. Paris: Campagne Première, 2012. 318 pp., ISBN 978-2-915789-53-9 [Incl. i. a.: L’arrivée des psychanalystes autrichiens en Palestine (1938); Traduire Freud en hébreu; Freud en Eretz Israël]

57230. Litt, Stefan: Zeugnisse deutsch-jüdischer Kulturgeschichte – Der Erwerb deutschsprachiger Privatnachlässe für die Jewish National and University Library in Jerusalem 1934–1971. [In]: Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte, Vol. 41, 2013 (Issue title: Deutsche(s) in Palästina und Israel. Alltag, Kultur, Politik. Ed. by José Brunner). Pp. 195–212

––. Luden, Josef: Israel: Zionismus & Anarchismus (1985). See No. 55784

57231. Maier-Wolthausen, Clemens: Eine unmögliche Reise. Ein Brief der Kinder- und Jugendalija in Schweden von 1940. [In]: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/articles.html#artikel308

57232. Maksymiak, Małgorzata A.: Untergangs- und Aufgangsprobleme der [sic] jüdischen Homo Europaeus. Zur zionistischen Kritik an Spenglers Geschichtsphilosophie. [In]: Zaur Gasimov; Carl Antonius Lemke Duque (Hrsg.): Oswald Spengler als europäisches Phänomen. Der Transfer der Kultur- und Geschichtsmorphologie im Europa der Zwischenkriegszeit 1919–1939. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht 2013 (Veröffentlichungen des Instituts für Europäische Geschichte Mainz, Abteilung für Universalgeschichte, Beiheft 99), ISBN 978-3-525-10126-1. Pp. 299–322

57233. Maksymiak, Malgorzata Anna: “Ezer Ke-Negdo” in Zionism: The Cases of Gerda Luft and Gabriele Tergit. [In]: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/articles.html#artikel323

57234. Maoz, Moshe: The Zionist/Jewish and Palestinian/Arab National Movements: The Question of Legitimacy – A Comparative Observation. [In]: Israel Studies, Vol. 18(2), 2013 (Special Issue: Shared Narratives – A Palestinian-Israeli Dialogue). Pp. 30–40

57235. Marzano, Arturo: Visiting British Palestine: Zionist travelers to Eretz Israel. [In]: Quest. Issues in Contemporary Jewish History, Vol. 4(6), 2013. http://www.quest-cdecjournal.it/index.php (03.03.2014)

57236. Michaels, Jennifer: An Unusual Traveler: Ida Pfeiffer’s Visit to the Holy Land in 1842. [In]: Quest. Issues in Contemporary Jewish History, Vol. 4(6), 2013. http://www.quest-cdecjournal.it/index.php (03.03.2014)

57237. Miron, Guy: Exile, Diaspora and the Promised Land: Jewish Future Images in Nazi Dominated Europe. [In]: Pál Hatos; Attila Novák (eds.): Between Minority and Majority: Hungarian and Jewish/Israeli Ethnical and Cultural Experiences in Recent Centuries. Budapest: Balassi Inst., 2013. Pp. 147–166

57238. Miskin, Edgar: Illegal Journey: From the Holocaust to Palestine in 1946. New York: Devora, 2013. 314 pp., ISBN 9789655241273

57239. MÜLLER-COHEN, ANITTA. Hecht, Dieter J.: Biographien jüdischer Frauen: Anitta Müller-Cohen (1890–1962). Sozialarbeit und Zionismus zwischen Wien und Tel Aviv. [In]: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/miscellaneous.html#artikel301

57240. Nemtsov, Jascha: Doppelt vertrieben: Deutsch-jüdische Komponisten aus dem östlichen Europa in Palästina/Israel. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 2013. 336 pp., illus., music (Jüdische Musik, Vol. 11), ISBN 978-3-447-06975-5

57241. Nittenberg, Joanna; Kaufmann, Benjamin (eds.): Trotz allem … Aron Menczer und die Jugendalijah. Wien: Edition INW, 2013. 191 pp., illus., ISBN 9783950035667 [Aron Menczer, b. 18. 04. 1917 Vienna, d. 7. 10. 1943 KZ Auschwitz-Birkenau]

57242. Or, Galia Bar; Minten-Jung, Nicole; Möller, Werner; Yasky, Yuval; Lehmann, Katja; Sonder, Ines; Oswalt, Philipp: Kibbuz und Bauhaus. Pioniere des Kollektivs. Leipzig: Spector Books, 2012. 144 S., ISBN 978-3940064448 [Reviewed by: Alexandra Klei, in: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/rezension.html (06.05.2014)]

57243. Oswalt, Philipp (ed.): bauhaus. Zeitschrift der Stiftung Bauhaus Dessau, Ausgabe 2: Israel, November 2011. 152 pp., ISBN 978-3940064295 [Reviewed by: Alexandra Klei, in: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/rezension.html (06.05.2014)]

57244. Patek, Artur: Jews on Route to Palestine 1934–1944. Sketches from the History of Aliyah Bet. Clandestine Jewish Immigration. Krakow: Jagiellonian University Press, 2012. 220 pp., ISBN 978-83-233-3390-6 [Reviewed by: Farid Al-Salim, in: American Historical Review, Vol. 119(3), 2014. Pp. 1022]

57245. Peiffer, Lorenz; Zimmermann, Moshe (eds.): Sport als Element des Kulturtransfers. Jüdische Sportler zwischen NS-Deutschland und Palästina. Göttingen: Wallstein, 2013. 249 pp., illus., ISBN 978-3-8353-1234-0 [Vorwort (Lorenz Peiffer; Moshe Zimmermann, 7–8); Einleitung (Lorenz Peiffer; Moshe Zimmermann, 9–13); Die Einsamkeit des Langstreckenläufers. Deutsch-jüdische Athleten und die Entstehung einer zionistischen (trans)nationalen Kultur (Ofer Ashkenazi, 14–48); Arthur Biram und die Einführung des Turnunterrichts in Erez Israel (Ofer Ashkenazi; Eyal Gertmann, 49–72); Die Beteiligung jüdischer Sportler aus Deutschland an der II. Makkabiah 1935 in Tel Aviv (Henry Wahlig, 73–98); Im Schatten antisemitischer Diskriminierung und Verfolgung. Sportliche Begegnungen zwischen jüdischen Mannschaften aus Nazideutschland und Erez Israel im Jahre 1937 (Eyal Gertmann; Lorenz Peiffer, 99–134); Zwischen Diaspora und Erez Israel – Fußball als Element des Kulturtransfers (Moshe Zimmermann, 135–146); »Im Turnunterricht ist ganz neu, daß man möglichst hebräische Kommandos gebrauchen möchte.« Die Veränderung des Turnunterrichts an den jüdischen Schulen im nationalsozialistischen Deutschland (Lorenz Peiffer; Nadine Werner, 147–168); Schulsport in Palästina von 1933 bis 1938 – im Spiegel von Berichten in deutsch-jüdischen Zeitungen (Lorenz Peiffer; Nadine Werner, 169–172); Dokumention. Einführung und Kommentierung der Dokumente (Ofer Ashkenazi; Eyal Gertmann; Henry Wahlig, 175–184); Dokumente: 1. Transfer von Sportarten nach Erez Israel (185); 2. Vereinsentwicklung in Erez Israel (193); 3. Jüdische Sportlerinnen und Sportler aus Deutschland bei der Makkabiah 1935 (200); 4. Sportreisen jüdischer Mannschaften nach Erez Israel nach Nazideutschland (234); 5. Sport in Palästina in den 1920er Jahren (245)]

57246. Poppe, Judith: Zwischen »unauffindbarem Gestern« und dem »Himmel voll Zuversicht«? Konzeptionen der Alten und der Neuen Heimat bei deutschsprachigen Schriftsteller/innen Israels. [In]: Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte, Vol. 41, 2013 (Issue title: Deutsche(s) in Palästina und Israel. Alltag, Kultur, Politik. Ed. by José Brunner). Pp. 161–178

––. Popper, Hans: Die freie organisierte Gemeinschaft des jüdischen Yishuv (Einwohnerschaft) in Palästina (1949). See No. 55784

57247. Rautenberg-Alianov, Viola: Schlagsahne oder Shemen-Öl? Deutsch-jüdische Hausfrauen und ihre Küche in Palästina 1936–1940. [In]: Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte, Vol. 41, 2013 (Issue title: Deutsche(s) in Palästina und Israel. Alltag, Kultur, Politik. Ed. by José Brunner). Pp. 82–96

57248. Rodov, Ilia: “With Eyes towards Zion:” Visions of the Holy Land in Romanian Synagogues. [In]: Quest. Issues in Contemporary Jewish History, Vol. 4(6), 2013. http://www.quest-cdecjournal.it/index.php (03.03.2014)

57249. Rokem, Na’ama: Prosaic Conditions: Heinrich Heine and the Spaces of Zionist Literature. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2013. XXI, 221 pp., ISBN 978-0-8101-2867-5 [Reviewed by: Allison Schachter, on: http://www.h-net.org/reviews/showpdf.php?id=42229 (19.08.2014)]

57250. Sebba-Elran, Tsafi: From Sefer Ha’aggadah to the Jewish Bookcase: Dynamics of a Cultural Change. [In]: Jewish Studies Quarterly, Vol. 20(3), 2013. Pp. 272–295 [The manifest popularity of H. N. Bialik and Y. H. Ravnitzky’s Sefer Ha’aggadah, its influence on the educational curriculum in the Yishuv and later in the State of Israel and the various languages into which it is translated all bear witness to the formative role of this book through the years in the construction of modern cultural memory … Only Sefer Ha’aggadah acquired such an influence that it became known as “the New Torah” of the Jews. This article seeks to understand and explain Bialik and Ravnitzky’s unique success in light of their literary innovations and cultural vision and to examine how they used their literary tools to bridge the historical and ideological gap between rabbinic tradition and the Jewish thought of their time … Like the romantic philosophers Herder and Schlegel, and apparently following Ahad Ha’am, Bialik and Ravnitzky related to Jewish myth and particularly to the aggadah as a national cultural heritage …]

57251. Sela-Sheffy, Rakefet: »Europeans in the Levant« Revisited – German Jewish Immigrants in 1930s Palestine and the Question of Culture Retention. [In]: Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte, Vol. 41, 2013 (Issue title: Deutsche(s) in Palästina und Israel. Alltag, Kultur, Politik. Ed. by José Brunner). Pp. 40–59

57252. Selzer, Assaf: The History of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Vol. 4: Who’s Who Prior to Statehood: Founders, Designers, Pioneers. Jerusalem: Magnes Press, 2013. 405 pp., ISBN 978-965-493-691-0

––. Shapiro, Alexander: Internationale Probleme. Palästina, England und die jüdische Frage (1930). See No. 55784

57253. Sheffi, Na’ama; Meilinger, Liliane: Vom Deutschen ins Hebräische. Übersetzungen aus dem Deutschen im Jüdischen Palästina 1882–1948. Translated by Liliane Meilinger. With a preface by Shulamit Volkov. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2011. 219 pp. (Jüdische Religion, Geschichte und Kultur, Vol. 14), ISBN 978-3-525-56938-2

57254. Shindler, Colin: The origins of Zionism. [In]: Joel Peters and David Newman (eds.): The Routledge Handbook on the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict. London [et. al.]: Routledge, 2013. ISBN 978-0-415-77862-6 / 978-0-203-07955-3. Pp. 11–19

57255. Shumsky, Dimitry: Leon Pinsker and “Autoemancipation!”: A Reevaluation. [In]: Jewish Social Studies, Vol. 18(1), 2013. Pp. 34–62

57256. Shumsky, Dimitry: Zweisprachigkeit und binationale Idee. Der Prager Zionismus 1900–1930. Transl. from the Hebrew by Dafna Mach. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2013. 336 pp. (Schriften des Simon-Dubnow-Instituts, Vol. 14), ISBN 978-352-53695-5-5 / 978-3-647-36955-6 (online resource) [Reviewed by: Martha Stellmacher. in: PaRDeS. Zeitschrift der Vereinigung für Jüdische Studien, Vol. 20, 2014. Pp. 175–176; Romy Langeheine, on: http://hsozkult.geschichte.hu-berlin.de/rezensionen/2014–2–188 (20.06.2014). “Die deutsche Übersetzung von Dimitry Shumskys 2005 an der Universität Haifa entstandener geschichtswissenschaftlicher Dissertation, die 2010 erstmalig auf Hebräisch erschien, macht nun auch der deutschen Leserschaft eine innovative Studie zum Prager Zionismus und den Anfängen der binationalen Idee als Lösungsmöglichkeit des jüdisch-arabischen Konflikts in Palästina zugänglich. Dieser Lösungsansatz wurde insbesondere von Mitgliedern des 1925 in Jerusalem gegründeten Intellektuellenzirkels Brith Schalom verfolgt, die bereits zu dieser Zeit auf die Dringlichkeit der Aussöhnung zwischen Juden und Arabern hinwiesen und verschiedene politische Programme dazu ausarbeiteten …”]

57257. Siegemund, Anja: Eine Bürgergesellschaft für den Jischuw – Deutsche liberalnationale Zionisten in Palästina. [In]: Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte, Vol. 41, 2013 (Issue title: Deutsche(s) in Palästina und Israel. Alltag, Kultur, Politik. Ed. by José Brunner). Pp. 60–81

57258. Sonder, Ines: “Das wollten wir. Ein neues Land …” Deutsche Zionistinnen als Pionierinnen in Palästina, 1897–1933. [In]: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/articles.html#artikel323

57259. Stahl, Neta: Other and Brother: Jesus in the 20th-Century Jewish Literary Landscape. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012. 248 pp., ISBN 978-0-19-976000-8 [Reviewed by Adele Reinhartz, on: https://www.h-net.org/reviews/showrev.php?id=3D39833 (25.01.2014). Incl. i. a.: The positive appropriation of Jesus by Zionist authors like Uri Zvi Greenberg (1896–1981), Yoel Hoffman (b. 1937), Avot Yeshurun (1904–1992), and others]

––. THEILHABER, FELIX ARON. Heuer, Renate: Eroberung des neuen Judentums für Israel – Felix Aron Theilhaber. See No. 57014

––. Vago, Raphael: Israel-Diaspora Relations: Mutual Images, Expectation, Frustrations. See No. 56189

57260. Vogt, Stefan: Neue Forschungen zum deutschsprachigen Zionismus. Einleitung in den Schwerpunkt. [In]: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/articles.html#artikel323

57261. Vogt, Stefan: Vertraute Feinde. Zionisten und Konservative Revolutionäre in der Weimarer Republik. [In]: Zeitschrift für Geschichtswissenschaft, Vol. 61(9), 2013. Pp. 713–732

57262. Wendehorst, Stephan E. C.: British Jewry, Zionism and the Jewish State 1936–1956. Oxford/New York: Oxford University Press, 2012. XIV, 422 pp. (Oxford Historical Monographs), ISBN 978-0-1992-6530-5 [Reviewed by: Colin Shindler, in: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/rezension.html (06.05.2014). “Stephan E. C. Wendehorst explores the relationship between British Jewry and Zionism from 1936 to 1956, a crucial period in modern Jewish history encompassing both the shoah and the establishment of the State of Israel …” (provided by the publisher)]

57263. Wilhelm, Karin; Gust, Kerstin (eds.): Neue Städte für einen neuen Staat. Die städtebauliche Erfindung des modernen Israel und der Wiederaufbau in der BRD. Eine Annäherung. Bielefeld: transcript, 2013. 348 pp., illus. (Urban Studies), ISBN 978-3-8376-2204-1 [Incl. i. a.: Neue Städte für einen neuen Staat. Die städtebauliche Erfindung des modernen Israel und der Wiederaufbau in der BRD. Eine Annäherung (Karin Wilhelm; Kerstin Gust, 9–22); Deutsch-jüdische Identitäten in der ersten Hälfte des 20. Jahrhunderts (Andreas Nachama; Julius H. Schoeps, 25–33); Edgar Salin – Aspekte seines Lebens und Denkens (Anton Föllmi, 34–45); »Urbanität« in Zeiten der Krise: Der Basler Arbeitsrappen (Korinna Schönhärl, 46–63); » … Träume, die verwirklicht werden … « Salins Suche nach Urbanität (Karin Wilhelm, 64–79); Edgar Salin und das Israel Economic and Sociological Research Project (IESRP). Facetten einer Annäherung (Joachim Trezib, 80–94); Die Erfindung des modernen Israel und der Sharon-Plan. Betrachtungen über ein Unbehagen (Zvi Efrat, 95–111); Konzepte der Initiativplanung in den ersten Jahren des Staates Israel (Ruth Kark, 112–125); Planung einer »Heimstatt« für die Nation (Rachel Kallus, 126–1947); Städtebau und architektonische Kultur als Faktoren der israelischen Identitätspolitik nach 1948 (Anna Minta, 141–154); Edgar Salins Konzeption des modernen Kapitalismus. Von Marx, Sombart und Weber zu einer europäischen Perspektive für die Globalisierung (Bertram Schefold, 209–227); Zwischen Humanismus und Nationalismus. Die Rezeption völkisch-nationalen Denkens im deutschsprachigen Zionismus (Stefan Vogt, 228–236); Siedlung und Landvolk. Die agrarpolitischen Annäherungen zwischen Edgar Salin und der »Sering-Schule« (Willi Oberkrome, 237–251); Nachklänge völkisch-romantischer Naturaneignung? Von der Jugendbewegung des Kaiserreiches bis zur Umweltgeschichtsschreibung in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland (Joachim Wolschke-Bulmahn, 252–267); Zum Kulturdiskurs der Bundesrepublik Deutschland in den Jahren des Wiederaufbaus (Axel Schildt, 268–278); Die Kontroverse um Reparationen in Israel (Yaakov Sharett, 279–288); Von Deutschen, Juden und Projektionen. Zum deutsch-israelischen Verhältnis in der Nachkriegszeit (Moshe Zuckermann, 289–304); Kurzbiografien Autoren (337–344). Reviewed by: Alexandra Klei, in: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/rezension.html (06.05.2014); Ines Sonder, on: http://hsozkult.geschichte.hu-berlin.de/rezensionen/2014–1–203 (21.03.2014). “Im Zentrum steht die Initiative des aus Frankfurt am Main gebürtigen und seit 1927 in Basel lehrenden Nationalökonomen Edgar Salin (1892–1974). Im Rahmen der List-Gesellschaft … koordinierte Salin zwischen 1957 und 1968 das “Israel Economic and Sociological Research Project” (IESRP), kurz “Israel Research Project” genannt.”]

57264. WOLFFSOHN, DAVID. Meybohm, Ivonne: David Wolffsohn: Aufsteiger, Grenzgänger, Mediator. Eine biographische Annäherung an die Geschichte der frühen Zionistischen Organisation (1897–1914). Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2013. 384 pp. (Jüdische Religion, Geschichte und Kultur, Vol. 17), ISBN 978-3-525-57028-9 [Reviewed by: Kerstin Armborst-Weihs, in: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/rezension.html (06.05.2014)]

57265. Zalashik, Rakefet: Das unselige Erbe. Die Geschichte der Psychiatrie in Palästina und Israel. Frankfurt a. M.: Campus, 2012. 214 pp., ISBN 978-3-593-39361-2 [Reviewed by: Jutta Faehndrich, on: http://hsozkult.geschichte.hu-berlin.de/rezensionen/2013–3–109 (02.09.2013). “Das erste Heim für psychisch Kranke wurde Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts von philanthropischen Ehefrauen oder Töchtern führender Zionisten gegründet. Die 1895 in Jerusalem von Chaya Tzipora Pines, Rosa Feinstein und Ita Yellin gegründete Anstalt Ezrat Nashim (Frauenhilfe) blieb über 25 Jahre lang die einzige, die psychisch Kranke aufnahm. Allerdings wurde dort erst 1920 der erste ausgebildete Psychiater eingestellt, der aus Galizien stammende Dorian Feigenbaum, der bei Sigmund Freud und Emil Kraepelin studiert hatte …”]

 

New Book: Ben-Rafael et al, eds. Reconsidering Israel-Diaspora Relations

Ben-Rafael, Eliezer, Judit Bokser Liwerant, and Yosef Gorny, eds. Reconsidering Israel-Diaspora Relations, Jewish Identities in a Changing World, 22. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2012.

 

67146

 

Table of Contents

 

Introduction
PART I. JEWISH PEOPLEHOOD: CHANGING PATTERNS OF ISRAEL-DIASPORA RELATIONS

1. Sergio Della Pergola: Jewish Peoplehood: Hard, Soft, and Interactive Markers
2. Jonathan D. Sarna: From World-Wide People to First-World People: The Consolidation (fn. concentration) of World Jewry
3. Shulamit Reinharz: The “Jewish Peoplehood” Concept: Complications and Suggestions
4. Yosef Gorny: Ethnicity and State Policy: The State of Israel in the Intellectual and Political Discourse of the US Jewish Press
5. Ephraim Yuchtman-Ya’ar and Steven M. Cohen: Close and Distant: The Relations between Israel and the Diaspora

PART II. RELIGIOSITY AND ETHNICITY

6. Yael Israel-Cohen: The Reform and Conservative Movements in Israel: Strategies of Peripheral Movements in a Monopolized Religious Market
7. Shlomo Fischer: Two Orthodox Cultures: “Centrist” Orthodoxy and Religious Zionism
8. Margalit Bejarano: Ethnicity and Transnationalism: Latino Jews in Miami
9. Nissim Leon: Strong Ethnicity: The Case of US-born Jews in Israel

PART III. GENDER AND GENERATION

10. Judith Tydor Baumel-Schwartz: Orthodox Jewish Women as a Bridge Between Israel and the Diaspora
11. Florinda Goldberg: Gender, Religion, and the Search for a Modern Jewish Identity in “La Rabina” by Silvia Plager
12. Erik H. Cohen: Global Jewish Youth Studies – Towards a Theory
13. Sylvia Barack Fishman: Generational and Cultural Constructions of Jewish Peoplehood

PART IV. ISRAELOPHOBIA, ANTI-ZIONISM AND “NEO”-ANTISEMITISM

14. Shmuel Trigano: Debasing Praise: Hatred of the Jews in a Global Age
15. Chantal Bordes-Benayoun: Integration and Antisemitism: The Case of French Jewry
16. Julius H. Schoeps: How Antisemitism, Obsessive Criticism of Israel, and Do-Gooders Complicate Jewish Life in Germany
17. Leonardo Senkman: Anti-Zionist Discourse of the Left in Latin America: An Assessment.
18. Uzi Rebhun, Chaim I. Waxman, Nadia Beider: American Jews and the Israeli-Palestinian Peace Process: A Study of Diaspora in International Affairs

PART V. CONFIGURATIONS OF WORLD JEWRY AND THE STATE OF ISRAEL

19. Judit Bokser-Liwerant: Jewish Diaspora and Transnationalism: Awkward (Dance) Partners?
20. Lars Dencik: The Dialectics of Diaspora in Contemporary Modernity
21. Gabi Sheffer: Reflections on Israel and Jerusalem as the Centers of World Jewry
22. Eliezer Ben-Rafael: Israel-Diaspora Relations: “Transmission Driving-belts” of Transnationalism

Epilogue: One – After All….for the time being

 

CFP: The 200th Anniversary of the Prussian Emancipation Edict for the Jews

Citizenship, Equality and Civil Society:

The 200th Anniversary of the Prussian Emancipation Edict for the Jews – 1812

International Conference, March 4th-6th, 2013 Jerusalem and Tel Aviv

 

This year, we will be commemorating the 200th anniversary of the Prussian Emancipation Edict for the Jews, in which civil rights were granted to the Jews of Prussia. Beyond its immediate effect on German Jewry, the Edict generated vigorous discussions over the fundamental principles of citizenship, the concept of civil society, and the status of minorities within society and the state. In contrast to the French Revolution, the Edict didn’t utterly transform the legal status of the Jews: they were not granted full and equal civil rights, and many of the rights that were granted were revoked soon after the Vienna Congress in 1815. Nevertheless, this historical moment confronted the ideas of the Enlightenment, the Haskala, Romanticism, and the emerging national discourse with concrete social policy in relation to minorities. In this confrontation, the question of the state’s relation to Jews served as a test case for more general and comprehensive questions about civil society.

 

This date provides an opportunity to examine the concepts of citizenship, civil society, and the relations between majority and minority groups as they developed in Germany and Israel. The contemporary debates over legal acts aimed at minorities, as well as the events of the previous summer in Israel, highlight the relevance of these issues to our present-day civil life.

 

Organizers: The conference is organized by the Leo Baeck Institute Jerusalem, the Minerva Center for Humanities at Tel Aviv University, the Rosenzweig Minerva Research Center at Hebrew University and the Institut für die Geschichte der deutschen Juden in Hamburg. The conference will take place in both Jerusalem and Tel Aviv.

 

The conference program:

 

Opening event for the general public with keynote speakers (in Hebrew).

One day is dedicated to historical issues, focusing on the concepts of citizenship, “civil society”, and relations between majority and minorities in the context of German Jewry. This day will take place in Jerusalem (in English).

One day is dedicated to discussions of the issues raised by the historical investigation on the previous day, in the Israeli contemporary context, with an emphasis on issues of civil society and minorities’ rights in Israel. This day will take place in Tel Aviv (in Hebrew).

 

According to this program, we invite scholars to present papers dealing with the following issues:

•             Historical aspects of the Prussian Edict for the Jews

•             The question of Jews and citizenship in the 19th and early 20th centuries in Germany

•             Questions of citizenship and civil society in the Israeli context

•             Minorities’ rights and political representation in Israel 

 

Please submit your paper proposal as follows:

• Contact information: name, email, and academic affiliation of the applicant • Up to 250-words abstract with the title of the paper • A 100-word biographical statement, in narrative form (one paragraph) All files should be sent in English in WORD files only.

 

Proposals should be sent by September 16th, 2012 to: citizenship.conference2013@gmail.com

Conference: Moses Hess between Socialism & Zionism, Jerusalem, March 18-20, 2012

Click here for PDF file of the Program, including contact details.

 

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International Conference

MOSES HESS BETWEEN SOCIALISM AND ZIONISM

200th Anniversary of his Birth (1812)

150th Anniversary of his Book “Rome and Jerusalem” (1862)

(Jerusalem, Sunday-Tuesday, March 18-20, 2012)

 

Leo Baeck Institute Jerusalem * Rosa Luxemburg Foundation, Israel Office * Martin Buber Chair for Jewish Thought and Philosophy, Goethe University Frankfurt am Main * Centre for German-Jewish Studies, University of Sussex

 

Opening Event

Sunday, March 18, 2012

Venue: The Jerusalem Institute for Israel Studies, 20 Radak Street

 

18:30 Gathering

 

Greetings

Anja Siegemund, Leo Baeck Institute Jerusalem

Peter Prügel, Minister and Chargé d’Affaires a.i. of the Federal Republic of Germany

Christian Wiese, Martin Buber Chair for Jewish Thought and Philosophy, Goethe University Frankfurt am Main

Angelika Timm, Rosa Luxemburg Foundation, Israel Office

 

Keynote Lecture

Shlomo Avineri (Jerusalem)

Moses Hess – Revolutionary, Communist, Zionist: A Re-Assessment.

 

Chair: Shulamit Volkov (Tel Aviv)

 

Reading of Hess’s texts by Illi Gorlitzky (in Hebrew)

 

 

Monday, March 19, 2012

Venue: Leo Baeck Institute Jerusalem, 33 Bustenai Street

 

9:30-11:00 The Spinozist Hess

Willi Goetschel (Toronto / Göttingen)

Hess and the Philosophical Moment of Radical Spinozism

Tracie Matysik (Austin)

Politics of Spinozist Friendship: Moses Hess and Berthold Auerbach

Chair: Shlomo Avineri (Jerusalem)

 

11:20-12:30 Hess and Marx

David McLellan (Kent)

Moses Hess, Karl Marx, and ‘True Socialism’: Similarities and Differences

Michael Kuur Sørensen (Odense)

The Concept of ‘Verkehr’: A Source of Conflict between Karl Marx and Moses Hess

Chair: Mario Kessler (Potsdam)

 

13:50-15:00 Hess in Paris

Silvia Richter (Heidelberg)

Moses Hess and Paris: The Influence of France and French Thinkers on his Work, with a View on Heine and Marx

Mark Gelber (Beer Sheva)

German-Speaking Jews in Paris and the Turn to Jewish Nationalism in the 19th Century: Heine, Hess, Herzl

Chair: Natalie Goldberg (Ramat Gan)

 

15:20-16:30 Money – Hess’s Criticism of Judaism

Adam Sutcliffe (London)

Moses Hess, Jewish Autocritique, and the Politics of Money

Sharon Gordon (Jerusalem)

Gold is the Language of God: Symbol and Metaphor in Hess’s “Über das Geldwesen”

Chair: Gideon Reuveni (Brighton)

 

16:50-18:00 The Universal Mission of the Jews

Ofri Ilani (Tel Aviv)

Hess’s “Die heilige Geschichte der Menschheit” and the Place of Jews in Universal History

Ron Margolin (Tel Aviv)

The Historic Mission of Jewish Humanism and its Maskilic Origins

Chair: Willi Goetschel (Toronto / Göttingen)

 

Tuesday, March 20, 2012

Venue: Leo Baeck Institute Jerusalem, 33 Bustenai Street

 

9:30-10:50 Rome and Jerusalem (1)

Iveta Leitane (Riga)

‘Socialism’ in ‘Nationalism’ and Vice Versa: The Narratives of Jewish Tradition and Religion in Moses Hess

Lorenzo Santoro (Cosenza)

“Rom und Jerusalem”: Giuseppe Mazzini and Moses Hess: Revolution, Nationalism, and the New Politics within the Boundaries of Religious Discourse

Chair: Gideon Freudenthal (Tel Aviv)

 

11:10-12:20 Rome and Jerusalem (2)

Kenneth Koltun-Fromm (Haverford)

Visual Authenticity in Moses Hess’s Rome and Jerusalem

Michael K. Silber (Jerusalem)

Languages of Nationalism: The Collective Representation of Jews in Moses Hess’s “Rom und Jerusalem”

Chair: Anja Siegemund (Jerusalem)

 

13:30-15:10 Jewish Messianism

George Y. Kohler (Beer Sheva)

The Dispute between Moses Hess and Leopold Löw: A Renewed Messianic Thought in Nineteenth-Century Germany

Christian Wiese (Frankfurt am Main)

Moses Hess and Samuel Hirsch on Judaism and Christianity

Mirjam Thulin (Frankfurt am Main)

Moses Hess and Heinrich Graetz: Science, History, and Concepts of the Jewish Nation

Chair: Paul Mendes-Flohr (Jerusalem)

 

15:30-16:40 The Dialectics of Socialism and Nationalism

Moshe Zuckermann (Tel Aviv)

Georg Lukács on Moses Hess: a Materialist Critique of Idealism 

Mario Kessler (Potsdam)

Moses Hess and the Marxist Discourse since 1945

Chair: Angelika Timm (Tel Aviv)

 

17:00-18:30 Round Table Twin Revolutions: Socialism and Zionism

Shlomo Avineri (Jerusalem)

David McLellan (Kent)

Anita Shapira (Tel Aviv)

Moshe Zuckermann (Tel Aviv)

Chair: Christian Wiese (Frankfurt am Main)

 

Conference website:

https://sites.google.com/site/moseshessconference/

 

Free Admission

Limited Number of Seats Available

 

 

 

Poster of conference (PDF).

Invitation 1, 2 (PDF).

Cite: Elias & Lemish, Russian Immigrant Families in Israel and Germany

Elias, Nelly and Dafna Lemish. “Between Three Worlds. Host, Homeland, and Global Media in the Lives of Russian Immigrant Families in Israel and Germany.” Journal of Family Issues 32.9 (2011): 1245-1274.

URL: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/32/9/1245

 

Abstract

This study investigated various roles played by host, homeland, and global media in the lives of immigrant families from the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS, former USSR) to Israel and Germany, as well as the place of different media in family conflicts, consolidation, and parenting strategies. The study was based on focus group interviews with 60 families of Russian-speaking immigrants in Israel and Germany and 73 semistructured, in-depth interviews with immigrant youngsters. The findings of this study demonstrate that the mass media fulfill diverse roles for immigrant families, assisting them face two main relocation challenges: integration “inward” (i.e., cultural transmission and family consolidation) and “outward” integration into their new surroundings.

Cite: Titzmann et al., Hassles among Adolescent Immigrants

Titzmann, Peter F., Rainer K. Silbereisen, Gustavo S. Mesch and Eva Schmitt-Rodermund. “Migration-Specific Hassles Among Adolescent Immigrants From the Former Soviet Union in Germany and Israel.” Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology 42.5 (2011): 777-794.

URL: http://jcc.sagepub.com/content/42/5/777.abstract

Abstract

This study compares the adaptation of diaspora immigrant adolescents from the former Soviet Union, ethnic Germans in Germany, and Russian Jews in Israel, using a new measure of acculturation-related hassles, which were defined as minor negative experiences originating from being an immigrant. Participants, who were 16 years of age on average in both immigrant groups, were assigned to three groups according to their length of residence. Based on acculturation theories, hypotheses were tested regarding frequency of language hassles, discrimination hassles, and family hassles depending on immigrant group and length-of-residence group. Results indicate that the overall level of language hassles and discrimination hassles was comparable in both countries, but family hassles were reported more frequently by immigrant adolescents in Israel. Adolescent immigrants in both countries reported fewer language hassles after being in the country for a longer period of time, although this effect was stronger in Germany. With regard to discrimination hassles and family hassles, adolescent immigrants who had lived in Germany for a longer period of time reported such hassles less frequently than their newly arrived counterparts; the opposite was found for adolescent immigrants in Israel. The results are discussed with regard to differences between both receiving countries in terms of necessity and opportunities to integrate into the receiving society.

Cite: Geller, On the Germanness of Gershom Scholem

Geller, Jay Howard. “From Berlin and Jerusalem: On the Germanness of Gershom Scholem.” Journal of Religious History 35.2 (2011): 211-232.

 

URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-9809.2010.01033.x/abstract

 

Abstract

Although Gershom Scholem, one of the leading Judaic studies scholars of modern times, was born and raised in Germany, he consistently represented himself as an un-German Jew. Rejection of Germany and Germanness was a leitmotif of Scholem’s self-presentation, particularly after immigrating to Jerusalem in 1923. Scholem became a central figure in the Jewish intelligentsia of mandate-era Palestine and later the state of Israel, and he helped shape Jewish discourse around the world. However, a re-examination of his unpublished and published correspondence, youthful journals, writings and interviews, and actual actions demonstrates that Scholem must also be seen as a German intellectual whose lifelong intellectual, political, social, and cultural predilections were the products of the German Jewish bourgeoisie and the German intelligentsia at the turn of the twentieth century. Long after emigrating from Germany, Scholem remained marked by Germanness and an ongoing relationship with Germany.

CFP: Contemporary Russian-Speaking Jewish Diaspora

Conference on the Contemporary Russian-Speaking Jewish Diaspora

November 14–15, 2011, at Harvard University
Cambridge, Massachusetts

Submission deadline: 5/14/2010

We are interested in papers from a range of disciplinary perspectives that address the history, evolution, and future of Russian-speaking Jewish communities, cultures, and identities. We encourage papers that move beyond the description of particular populations or institutions and introduce analyses of the problems, paradoxes, contradictions, and challenges involved in thinking about the Russian-speaking Jews.

The following themes are suggested as guides for the formulation of topics for paper proposals:

  • Globalization, Transnationalism, and Ethno-Cultural Diasporas in the 21st Century
  • Political Behavior, Social Mobility, Commercial Activities, and Cultural Endeavors
  • Definitions of Jewishness
  • Cultural Expressions of Russian-Speaking Jews
  • Media and Communications
  • Future of the Russian-Speaking Jewish Diaspora

 

Sponsors:

The Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at Harvard University, with the cooperation of the American Councils for International Education and the Russian Foundation for Humanities, invites submissions of paper proposals for an international conference on the Russian-speaking Jewish diaspora that has been formed over the past four decades.

Background:

The emigration of about 1.5 million Jews from the former Soviet Union (FSU) in several large waves since the mid-1970s—more than three times as many as those who remain—has affected Jewish life in its successor states and in the host countries. The post-1989 migration of Jews from the FSU, for example, constitutes the single largest immigration in the sixty-two-year history of Israel and the largest group of Jews to come to the United States and to Germany since the early twentieth century.

This conference will focus on how Russian-speaking Jews in the late 20th–early 21st centuries have affected the cultures, politics, and economies of Israel, the United States, and Germany, as well as the "sending" countries of the FSU. Conferees will consider whether Russian-speaking Jewry constitutes "a global community," and how this recent migration challenges the larger concepts of "identity" and "diaspora" across geographic and national borders.

For a fuller description of the suggested themes, please see our Web site:

http://daviscenter.fas.harvard.edu/seminars_conferences/diaspora

Papers will also be considered on any other themes relevant to the contemporary Russian-speaking Jewish diaspora. Note that the working language of the conference is English: all papers must be submitted and presented in English.

Submitting a Proposal:

Junior and senior scholars in the humanities and social sciences, as well as others working in relevant areas, are eligible to apply, irrespective of citizenship or country of residence. Proposals should be submitted via the conference Web site: http://daviscenter.fas.harvard.edu/seminars_conferences/diaspora.

Submissions must include:

  • a completed online application form
  • a project abstract of approximately 250 words
  • a 2-page curriculum vitae (CV) listing education, publications, fellowships and awards, and recent work and teaching experience

The deadline for submitting proposals is May 14, 2010. All materials must be submitted in English. Decisions will be announced by July 1, 2010. Presenters must submit their final conference papers by September 1, 2011. Selected papers will be considered for publication in an edited volume.

Harvard University and cooperating funders will cover presenters’ expenses for travel, lodging, and meals. A modest honorarium will also be provided (contingent on presenter’s eligibility to receive payment).

Project Organizers:
Zvi Gitelman, Professor of Political Science and Preston R. Tisch Professor of Judaic Studies, University of Michigan
Lisbeth L. Tarlow, Ph.D., Associate Director, Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies, Harvard University

More Information:
For additional information about the conference, please see http://daviscenter.fas.harvard.edu/seminars_conferences/diaspora or contact diaspora@fas.harvard.edu.