New Article: Webber et al, Divergent Paths to Martyrdom and Significance among Suicide Attackers

Webber, David, Kristen Klein, Arie Kruglanski, Ambra Brizi, and Ariel Merari. “Divergent Paths to Martyrdom and Significance among Suicide Attackers.” Terrorism and Political Violence (early view; online first).

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09546553.2015.1075979

 

Abstract

This research used open source information to investigate the motivational backgrounds of 219 suicide attackers from various regions of the world. We inquired as to whether the attackers exhibited evidence for significance quest as a motive for their actions, and whether the eradication of significance loss and/or the aspiration for significance gain systematically differed according to attackers’ demographics. It was found that the specific nature of the significance quest motive varied in accordance with attackers’ gender, age, and education. Whereas Arab-Palestinians, males, younger attackers, and more educated attackers seem to have been motivated primarily by the possibility of significance gain, women, older attackers, those with little education, and those hailing from other regions seem to have been motivated primarily by the eradication of significance loss. Analyses also suggested that the stronger an attacker’s significance quest motive, the greater the effectiveness of their attack, as measured by the number of casualties. Methodological limitations of the present study were discussed, and the possible directions for further research were indicated.

 

 

New Article: Yarchi, The Effect of Female Suicide Attacks on Foreign Media Framing of Conflicts

Yarchi, Moran. “The Effect of Female Suicide Attacks on Foreign Media Framing of Conflicts: The Case of the Palestinian–Israeli Conflict.” Studies in Conflict & Terrorism 37.8 (2014): 674-88.

 

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/1057610X.2014.921768

 

Abstract

The study examines the effect of female suicide attacks on foreign media framing of conflicts. Examining the Palestinian–Israeli conflict, 2,731 articles were sampled that covered terrorist events (American, British, and Indian press); 625 appeared in the week following a female’s suicide attack, 97 reported an attack by a female perpetrator. The findings suggest that foreign media discourse around female suicide bombers promotes more messages about the society within which the terrorists are embedded. Since the coverage of female terrorists tends to provide more detailed information about the perpetrator, it focuses more on the terror organizations’ side of the conflict’s story.