New Article: Zisberg et al, Adaptation to Life in Continuing Care Communities among Older Adults

Zisberg, Anna, Waheed Kaabiya, and Elena O. Siegel. “Trait of Routinization and Adaptation to Life in Continuing Care Communities among Older Adults in Israel.” Geriatrics & Gerontology International 15.4 (2015): 501-507.

 

URL: http://dx.do.org/10.1111/ggi.12289

 

Abstract

Aim

To examine the relationship between levels of adaptation to independent living in continuing care communities and the personality trait, routinization.

Methods

Using a correlative design, structured face-to-face interviews were carried out with 120 older adults residing in independent housing units across six continuing care facilities in Israel, using the Index of Relocation Adjustment and the Variety Assessment Scale questionnaires.

Results

In a mixed model, one of the two routinization subscales (disliking disruption) was moderately associated with adaptation, controlling for decision to enter the facility, satisfaction with the facility, family relationship, functional status, education, family status and type of setting. Residents who expressed high levels of disliking disruption, higher functional status and less involvement in the decision to enter the facility reported poorer adaptation to their living conditions.

Conclusion

Our findings point out the complexity and intricacy of personal attributes as factors associated with adaptation to transitions in older age, and highlight the potential contribution of the trait of routinization to adaptation. Further research is required to identify ways to best support older adult transitions to institutional environments, considering different personality traits and environments.

New Article: Hacker, The Rights of the Dead through the Prism of Israeli Succession Disputes

Hacker, Daphna. “The Rights of the Dead through the Prism of Israeli Succession Disputes.” International Journal of Law in Context 11.1 (2015): 40-58.

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1744552314000354

Abstract

This paper aims at contributing to the evolving debate over the rights of the dead by providing it with concrete empirical socio-legal context. A pioneering study of succession disputes, conducted in Israel, exposes a gap between a prominent judicial promise to respect the wishes and guard the dignity of the deceased testator, and the actual action taking place behind this rhetoric. The findings reveal that the testator’s dignity and wishes are trampled during testamentary procedures, when demeaning allegations about his or her mental and physical competence are allowed, and personal and medical information is exposed, and when the judge approves settlements that diverge from the testator’s last will in the name of familial reconciliation, even though in most cases there are no nuclear family ties between the rival parties. These findings are discussed in the light of an original typology mapping the theoretical controversies over posthumous rights, to highlight some of the possible normative implications of the project for the law on the books and law in action related to property division after death.

New Article: Shilo et al, Individual and Community Resilience Factors Among LGBQ in Israel

Shilo, Guy, Nadav Antebi, and Zohar Mor. “Individual and Community Resilience Factors Among Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Queer and Questioning Youth and Adults in Israel.” American Journal of Community Psychology 55.1-2 (2015): 215-27.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10464-014-9693-8

 

Abstract

Drawing on resilience theories, this study examined the individual and community factors of Israeli lesbians, gays, bisexuals, queers, and questioning (LGBQs) that contribute to positive mental health and the degree to which individual and community protective factors mitigate the adverse effect of risk factors for poor mental health. Differences in resilience factors between LGBQ youth and adults were explored. Data were collected on 890 LGBQ youth and adults. Findings emphasize the role of community-level resilience factors in the lives of LGBQs, and that these support systems differ slightly between the two age groups. Among youth, family support was both a strong predictor for well-being and a protective factor for mental distress. Although family support was found as a resilience factor among adults as well, other community-level factors (friends’ support, LGBT connectedness and having steady partner) were found as protective factors for poorer mental health. These findings suggest for efforts on fostering familial support for LGBQ youth and a multi-level system that offers support at the familial, peer, relationship and community levels for both LGBQ youth and adults.

New Article: Vertsberger and Gati, Career Decision-Making Difficulties Among Israeli Young Adults

Vertsberger, Dana and Itamar Gati. “Career Decision-Making Difficulties and Help-Seeking Among Israeli Young Adults.” Journal of Career Development (early view; online first).

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0894845315584162

 

Abstract

The present research focused on the various types of support young adults consider using when making career decisions and located factors that affect their intentions to seek help. Career decision-making difficulties (assessed by the Career Decision-making Difficulties Questionnaire), self-reported intentions to seek help, and career decision status were elicited from 300 young adults deliberating about their future career. The results show that participants’ intentions to seek help were positively correlated with their career decision-making difficulties and with their career decision status. The results also show discrepancies between the perceived effectiveness of the various types of support (e.g., family and friends, career counselors, and Internet) and the participants’ intentions to use them. Young adults are more inclined to seek help from types of support that are easily accessible to them (e.g., family and friends, and the Internet), and less from those that have been proven to be beneficial (e.g., career counselors, online questionnaires).

 

Conference Paper: Berkovitch & Manor, Grandparents Care Work in a Neo Liberal Era

Berkovitch, Nitza, and Shlomit Manor. “‘We Must Help Them As Much As We Can’: Grandparents Care Work in a Neo Liberal Era.” Inequality in the 21st Century, LSE, London, July 4, 2015, 8:30am.

 

URL: https://sase.confex.com/sase/2015am/webprogram/Paper2416.html

 

Abstract

Similar to many other countries, the Israeli family has undergone major changes in the last few decades, chief among these are processes of individualization and the emergence of “new forms of families” or postmodern families. However, the Israeli family—traditional or new—still plays a central role in public life and in the lives of individuals from all social groups. In this paper we focus on grandparents and grandparental child care within these changing configurations of the family.

In addition to cultural factors, the care provided by grandparents, is also influenced by the “new economy”. In the wake of globalization and neo liberalization, we have witnessed increasing demands on professionals – both in term of their hours and availability. There has also been a rise in the number of workers in hourly-waged “precarious” or “bad jobs” with little to no flexibility. These trends coupled with the growing numbers of working mothers with young children have resulted in a “care deficit” and a growing demand for child care.  In a familist society, such as Israel, this is translated into the young parents’ expectations that their parents, the grandparents, will help shoulder the care work.

Based on in-depth interviews of 32 Jewish retirees, men and women with heterogeneous class backgrounds, we examine how economic forces and cultural factors have shape gendered grandparents’ care practices and meanings. Though both men and women feel that grandparenthood is an important and central aspect in their lives, they still grandparent differently. Whereas women tend to perceive taking care of their grandchildren as a continuation of their role as mothers, helping adult children juggle between work and family, for men fatherhood continues by carrying on their “provider” role and assisting their children financially. These men “slide” easily into the grandfather role without much internal deliberation, whereas women are much more likely to debate among themselves about what constitutes “a good grandmother” and what kind of grandmother they are or would like to be. They oscillate between the individualistic cultural imperative of “it’s me time” and the motherly imperative that, in the Israeli context, never ends.

This gendered perception of grandparenting has two interrelated implications. One, it tends to reproduce the gendered division of care work both among the grandparents and the young couples. It is most often the grandmother who takes responsibility, though the grandfather might tag along. Moreover, the care grandparents provide is usually understood in terms of helping the young mother (daughter or daughter-in-law) more than the father. Two, this emerging Israeli version of “two- person career” (Papanek 1973) family where the (house)wife, who now works full- time, is replaced by care-on-demand grandmothers enables employers to place increasing demands on workers’ time and commitments, assuming that every worker (with family responsibilities) has someone at home to help with domestic care work. Thus, neoliberal labor market practices appear to be operating in tandem with and are maintained by gendered moral rationalities, which are based on love, commitment and an ideology of the “good mother”.

 

New Article: Shechory-Bitton et al, Parenting Styles Among Jewish and Arab Muslim Israeli Mothers

Shechory-Bitton, Mally, Sarah Ben David and Eliane Sommerfeld. “Effect of Ethnicity on Parenting Styles and Attitudes Toward Violence Among Jewish and Arab Muslim Israeli Mothers. An Intergenerational Approach.” Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology 46.4 (2015): 508-24.

 

URL: http://jcc.sagepub.com/content/46/4/508

 

Abstract

The cultural heterogeneity of Israeli society creates a unique opportunity to study the effects of ethnicity and intergenerational differences on parenting styles, attitudes, and practices. Three groups of mother–daughter dyads took part in the study: Native-born Jewish (NBJ) Israelis (155 dyads), Jewish Mizrahi (JM) immigrants (immigrants from Muslim countries (133 dyads), and native-born Arab Muslim (NBA) Israelis (86 dyads). Participants were located through a “snowball” process in which participants referred their friends to the researchers or gave the researchers names of potential participants. Interethnic differences were found in the mothers’ generation, with JM mothers falling in between NBJ and NBA mothers. This trend changed when we examined differences between the daughters. Although intergenerational differences were found in all groups, the differences were more prominent among Jewish mother–daughter dyads than among mother–daughter dyads in the Muslim population. Contrary to the research hypothesis, the parenting style of JM women was closer to that of NBJ mothers than to NBA mothers. The findings are discussed with reference to the complexity of Israeli society and to the encounter between the culture of the immigrant women who came from Muslim countries and the Western culture of the host society.

 
 
 

New Article: Ziv and Freund-Eschar, Pregnancy Experience of Gay Couples Expecting a Child Through Overseas Surrogacy

Ziv, Ido and Yael Freund-Eschar. “The Pregnancy Experience of Gay Couples Expecting a Child Through Overseas Surrogacy.” Family Journal 23.2 (2015): 158-166.

 

URL: http://tfj.sagepub.com/content/23/2/158

 

Abstract

This study aims to analyze the emotional experience of pregnancy for gay couples who turn to overseas surrogacy and face a geographical distance from the pregnancy. In-depth interviews were conducted with 16 gay intended fathers, mean age 35.5 years, most of whom expected a child through surrogacy in India. The unborn children’s gestational age ranged from 10 weeks to 32 weeks. A qualitative thematic analysis of the interviews shows that the interviewees felt frustration and anxiety due to their distance from the physical pregnancy and, specifically, their inability to experience the physical presence of the fetus. The resulting emotional disconnect from the developing fetus impacted the development of their parental sense during the pregnancy. The results highlight the importance for the intended parents of establishing a close relationship with the surrogate mother, as is customary in the United States but generally not in countries such as India. The findings support the value of establishing international guidelines for cross-border reproductive services.

CFP: Child and Family in challenging situations: legal issues (Ono Academic College, apply by April 30, 2015)

logo

Click here for a PDF file of this announcement.

Notice of Academic Symposium and Call for Papers

“Child and Family in challenging situations: legal issues”

June 9-10, 2015, Ono Academic College Faculty of Law, Kiryat Ono (Israel)

The International Academy for the Study of the Jurisprudence of the Family (“IASJF”) is pleased to announce that it will hold its 8th international symposium on the jurisprudence of the family on on Tuesday and Wednesday, June 9-10, 2015, at Ono Academic College Faculty of Law, Kiryat Ono, Israel. The topic of the symposium is “Child and Family in Challenging Situations: Legal Issues.” The Symposium will address the issues related to the topic from a juridical point of view; interdisciplinary presentations are also welcome.

Kiryat Ono, Israel, is in the Tel Aviv metropolitan area, and approximately 50 minutes’ drive from Jerusalem. The Ono Faculty of Law is Israel’s largest law school with 50 full-time faculty members including two full-time Family Law faculty: Dr. Yitshak Cohen and Dr. Yoav Mazeh, who are the hosts of this symposium. The symposium will be followed with an organized tour to the Old City of Jerusalem, which will take place on Thursday, June 11th.

The International Academy (IASJF), is an independent, interdisciplinary scholarly society that seeks to promote thoughtful consideration and discussion of the foundations of the family, including marriage, parenting, extended and other family relations. Our website is at: http://www.iasjf.org/. The IASFJ has previously hosted academic symposia at Boston College Law School in Boston, Massachusetts, USA; at Bratislava Law School of Pan-European University in Bratislava, Slovakia; at Pontifical Catholic University of Buenos Aires in Buenos Aires, Argentina; at the University of Malta in Valletta, Malta; in Doha, Qatar (hosted by the Doha International Institute for Family Studies and Development); at Cardozo Law School, New York City, USA; and at University of La Coruña, Spain. The IASFJ sponsors the International Journal of the Jurisprudence of the Family (“IJJF”), which is published in both print editions and in HeinOnline. Papers from prior symposia have been published in the IJJF; and selected submitted papers from the 2015 Symposium will be published in Volume 6 of the IJJF.

A person wishing to present a scholarly paper at the symposium should submit a short abstract of the paper they propose (no more than one page) including a working title, the identity, institutional affiliation and full contact information of the author(s), and a brief description of the paper proposed. Proposals should be sent to Professor Lynn D. Wardle (BYU, US) at wardlel@law.byu.edu, to Professor Carlos Martínez de Aguirre (University of Zaragoza, Spain) at aguirre@unizar.es, or to Dr. Yitshak Cohen (Ono Academic College, Israel) at Itshak_c@ono.ac.il , by April 30, 2015. Acceptances will be on a rolling basis. All symposium participants must register ($ 80 for Academy members, $ 120 for non-members, plus $ 40 late fee after 31 March 2015) and pay for their own transportation and hotel. The fee includes all symposium meals. Please, check for updated news about this symposium on http://www.iasjf.org/.

New Article: Cohen et al., Fatherhood of Divorced Custodial Fathers in Israel

Cohen, Orna, Ricky Finzi-Dottan, and Gali Tangir-Dotan. “The Fatherhood Experience of Divorced Custodial Fathers in Israel.” Family Relations 63.5 (2014): 639-53.

 

URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/fare.12092/abstract

 

Abstract

This qualitative study examines the fatherhood experience of 20 divorced men who are raising children on their own. The findings were gathered from semistructured in-depth interviews. The interviewees’ depictions revealed a process of making place for oneself in a multiparticipant arena facing social systems, the mother of the children, and the children themselves. The main findings concern the circumstances of single fatherhood: a constraint and a choice stemming from the mother’s incapacity, the nature of the relationships created between mother and children and between father and mother, and the burden and pleasure contained within single parenthood. The discussion looks at the findings through the prism of Baxter and Montgomery’s (1996) dialectic theory. It sheds light on the ongoing, contrast-filled process of establishing a perception of fatherhood, and the experiences of divorced fathers raising their children on their own.

New Article: Shenkman and Shmotkin, Psychological Welfare among Israeli Gay Fathers

Shenkman, Geva and Dov Shmotkin. “‘Kids Are Joy’: Psychological Welfare Among Israeli Gay Fathers.” Journal of Family Issues 35.14 (2014): 1926-1939.

 

URL: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/35/14/1926

 

Abstract

This study examined the psychological welfare associated with gay men couplehood (being in relationship) and gay fatherhood. From a sample of 204 Israeli gay men (age range 19-79), we compared 45 gay fathers (55.6% of them being in a steady relationship) with 45 individually matched gay men who were not fathers on indicators of psychological welfare, namely, subjective well-being, depressive symptoms (a reverse indicator), and meaning in life. In line with the study hypothesis, the results indicated that couplehood and parenthood were both associated with higher psychological welfare. Whereas the previously reported heterosexual “parenthood paradox” relates parenthood to decreased levels of subjective well-being along with increased levels of meaning in life, the current study suggests that gay fathers have elevated levels of both subjective well-being and meaning in life. We discuss possible interpretations of the findings.

 

New Article: Shoham, Celebrating Israeli Familism around the Seder Table

Shoham, Hizky. “You Can’t Pick Your Family. Celebrating Israeli Familism around the Seder Table.” Journal of Family History 39.3 (2014): 239-60.

 

URL: http://jfh.sagepub.com/content/39/3/239

 

Abstract

Familism is a model of a social organization that assigns the family an important role in individual and collective identity. This article proposes a historical analysis and interpretation of the Seder celebrations of Jewish Israelis, in order to explore what is unique about Israeli familism—that it imagines the entire nation as an extended family. This ritual continues to be widely practiced today by Jews of every sector—secular, traditional, and religious. As a result, it has a significant presence in Israeli popular culture. The focus is on two questions: (1) who celebrates? That is, what forum convenes around the table? (2) How is it celebrated? That is, what ritual is conducted during the festive gathering? The historical and ethnographic analysis shows that over the course of the twentieth century, the extended family became the preferred forum for celebration, and that the conformist reading of the Haggadah and the other parts of the ceremony continue on the whole to follow the Orthodox rules, even in secular families. This mode of celebration is analyzed here as an expression of the political image of the entire Jewish people as one large extended family and as a demonstration of the extensive use of Jewish familism in the construction of Jewish identity in Israel today

New Book: Fuchs, Israeli Feminist Scholarship

Fuchs, Esther, ed. Israeli Feminist Scholarship. Gender, Zionism, and Difference. Austin, TX : University of Texas Press, 2014.

Israeli Feminist Scholarship-cover

More than a dozen scholars give voice to cutting-edge postcolonial trends (from ecofeminism to gender identity in family life) that question traditional approaches to Zionism while highlighting nationalism as the core issue of Israeli feminist scholarship today.

Table of Contents

Preface

Introduction. Israeli Feminist Scholarship: Gender, Zionism, and Difference

Esther Fuchs

Chapter One. The Evolution of Critical Paradigms in Israeli Feminist Scholarship: A Theoretical Model

Esther Fuchs

Chapter Two. Politicizing Masculinities: Shahada and Haganah

Sheila H. Katz

Chapter Three. The Double or Multiple Image of the New Hebrew Woman

Margalit Shilo

Chapter Four. The Heroism of Hannah Senesz: An Exercise in Creating Collective National Memory in the State of Israel

Judith T. Baumel

Chapter Five. The Feminisation of Stigma in the Relationship Between Israelis and Shoah Survivors

Ronit Lentin

Chapter Six. Gendering Military Service in the Israel Defense Forces

Dafna N. Izraeli

Chapter Seven. The Halachic Trap: Marriage and Family Life

Ruth Halperin-Kaddari

Chapter Eight. Motherhood as a National Mission: The Construction of Womanhood in the Legal Discourse in Israel

Nitza Berkovitch

Chapter Nine. No Home at Home: Women’s Fiction vs. Zionist Practice

Yaffah Berlovitz

Chapter Ten. Wasteland Revisited: An Ecofeminist Strategy

Hannah Naveh

Chapter Eleven. Tensions in Israeli Feminism: The Mizrahi-Ashkenazi Rift

Henriette Dahan-Kalev

Chapter Twelve. Scholarship, Identity, and Power: Mizrahi Women in Israel

Pnina Motzafi-Haller

Chapter Thirteen. Reexamining Femicide: Breaking the Silence and Crossing “Scientific” Borders

Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian

Chapter Fourteen. The Construction of Lesbianism as Nonissue in Israel

Erella Shadmi

Chapter Fifteen. From Gender to Genders: Feminists Read Women’s Locations in Israeli Society

Hanna Herzog

Acknowledgments

Contributors

Index

 

Purchase from publisher: https://utpress.utexas.edu/index.php/books/fucisr

ToC: Israel Affairs 19.1 (2013)

Israel Affairs, Vol. 19, No. 1, 01 Jan 2013 is now available on Taylor & Francis Online.
Special Issue: The Israeli Palestinians Revisited
This new issue contains the following articles:

Preface
Preface
Alexander Bligh & Efraim Karsh
Pages: 1-1
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.748284
Original Articles
Israel’s Arabs: deprived or radicalized?
Efraim Karsh
Pages: 2-20
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.748285
Political trends in the Israeli Arab population and its vote in parliamentary elections
Alexander Bligh
Pages: 21-50
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.748286
Israel’s policy towards its Arab minority, 1947–1950
Yoav Gelber
Pages: 51-81
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.748287
The Israeli Arab extended family and the inner courtyard: a historical portrait
Kobi Peled
Pages: 82-98
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.748288
The Israeli establishment and the Israeli Arabs during the First Intifada
Alexander Bligh
Pages: 99-120
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.748289
Israel’s Arab leadership in the decade attending the October 2000 events
Gadi Hitman
Pages: 121-138
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.748290
Israel and the Northern Branch of the Islamic Movement
Eyal Pascovich
Pages: 139-153
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.748291
Another flew over the digital divide: internet usage in the Arab-Palestinian sector in Israel during municipal election campaigns, 2008
Azi Lev-On
Pages: 154-169
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.748292
Israel’s 2003 Plan for the Unification of Local Authorities
Rami Zeedan
Pages: 170-190
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.748293
Police officers’ acceptance of community policing strategy in Israel and their attitudes towards the Arab minority
Amikam Harpaz & Sergio Herzog
Pages: 191-213
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.748294
Israel’s other Palestinian problem: the Future Vision Documents and the demands of the Palestinian minority in Israel
Dov Waxman
Pages: 214-229
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.748295
Erratum
De-legitimization of Israel in Palestinian Authority Schoolbooks
Arnon Groiss
Pages: 230-230
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.717412
Miscellany
Corrigendum
Pages: 231-231
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.778533

Cite: Schellekens and Gliksberg, Inflation and Marriage in Israel

Schellekens, Jona and David Gliksberg. “Inflation and Marriage in Israel.” Journal of Family History 38.1 (2013): 78-93.

URL: http://jfh.sagepub.com/content/38/1/78.abstract

Abstract

At the end of the 1970s and the beginning of the 1980s, inflation in Israel exceeded 100 percent. Using the twenty percent samples of the 1972, 1983, 1995, and 2008 Israeli Census, we show that inflation had a substantial negative effect on the decision to marry. More specifically, we show that high inflation influenced marriage by creating economic uncertainty. Without the episode of high inflation, the decline in marriage would have been delayed for several years. We also show that there were educational differences in the effect of inflation on marriage formation.