Bulletin: Israeli literature and Israel in Literature

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Bulletin: Identity and Nationalism

ToC:

Shofar 34.4 (2016): Special issue on Exile, Center, and Diaspora in Modern Jewish Culture

Articles:

Hochman, Oshrat, and Sibylle Heilbrunn. “‘I am not a German Jew. I am a Jew with a German passport’: German-Jewish identification among Jewish Germans and Jewish German Israelis.” Identities (online first).

Reviews:

Kheir, Zaha. “Review of: Fran Markowitz, Stephen Sharot, Moshe Shokeid (eds.), Toward an Anthropology of Nation Building and Unbuilding in Israel (Lincoln and London: University of Nebraska Press, 2015).” Nations and Nationalism 22.4 (2016): 850-852.

Theses:

Gelotte, Sara. National Identities among Israelis and Palestinians: Discourse Analysis of NGOs, MA Thesis. University of Gothenburg, 2016. (PDF)

Events:

Sammy Smooha, “Is Israel Really Western? Does it Have Viable Alternative Options?” October 26, 2016, 5:30pm, Brunei Gallery Room, SOAS, London.

Abstract: Israel is known as a Western state, culture and society. Applying various standards of Western civilisation, Smooha scrutinises and problematizes this international and self-image, questioning whether Israel is indeed Western. He discusses the barriers in Israel’s drive to the West and the alternative options it has (Middle-Eastern, Mediterranean, global).

 

New Article: Kijek, Hebraism, Polonization, and Tarbut Schools in the Last Decade of Interwar Poland

Kijek, Kamil. “Was It Possible to Avoid ‘Hebrew Assimilation’? Hebraism, Polonization, and Tarbut Schools in the Last Decade of Interwar Poland.” Jewish Social Studies 21.2 (2016): 105-41.

 

URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2979/jewisocistud.21.2.04

 

Abstract

This article examines the problem of the chasm between Zionist ideology, Jewish cultural reality in interwar Poland, and the praxis of Zionist education of this period, manifested in the activities of the Tarbut school network. According to the Zionist idea of monocultural nationalism, the process of acculturation to which interwar Polish Jewry was subjected was conceived as assimilation, which threatened the possibility of the existence of Hebrew culture and Zionist activities in the diaspora. In this article I present reactions to acculturation (or assimilation) through the prism of the polemic of Polish- and Erets Yisrael–based ideologues and educators and through the dissonance between Tarbut educational ideology and praxis, as manifested in the Hebrew educational journal Ofakim, in other publications, and in school programs. I also analyze recollections of Tarbut pupils, their educational experiences, and accounts of how they were perceived in those schools.

 

 

 

CFP: “Promised Lands: Israel-Diaspora Relations and Beyond” Workshop for Young Scholars (Munich, May 23-25, 2016)

The young scholars’ workshop focuses on the relationship between the State of Israel and Jewish communities worldwide. This relationship is often conceptualized in ideologically charged terms. “Diaspora,” the term most frequently used for Jewish communities outside of Israel, describes these relations in terms of “center” and “periphery” and is filled with negative connotations going back to religious traditions of spiritual diminishment and exile. But beyond messianic utopias, the actual state plays a great variety of different roles among Jews and their communities. Since its creation in 1948, Israel has shaped and formed the perceptions and self-perceptions of Jews around the world. What is more, these communities influence and shape Israeli culture, society and politics. Migration in both directions is a key element of these relations as migrants serve as agents of transcultural exchange and considerably help shaping mutual perceptions. These complex and multilayered relations and their representations are at the center of the workshop.

The workshop offers young scholars from Europe in the field of Israel Studies a forum to discuss their work with their peers and senior scholars alike. Scholars on the doctoral and post-doctoral level (within three years after completing their Ph.D.) can expand their networks and help to foster a vivid academic community of Israel Studies in Europe.

The workshop is supported by the Israel Institute and will take place at the Center for Advanced Studies / LMU Munich, Mai 23-25, 2016 under the direction of Michael Brenner (LMU Munich), Daniel Mahla (LMU Munich) and Johannes Becke (Center for Jewish Studies Heidelberg). Featured speakers include Derek Penslar (Oxford/Toronto) and Michael Berkowitz (UCL London).

To apply please send in an abstract of up to 300 words about the proposed paper and a CV until January 18, 2016 to: daniel.mahla@lrz.uni-muenchen.de.

Topics can include, but are not limited to:

– Political, economic and social relations between the State of Israel and Jewish communities worldwide

– Israeli emigration and its representation

– The concept of Jewish Diaspora and its changes after 1948

– The meanings and significance of the concept of a “dispersed people” for Jews and Israel

– The roles of exile and home in Jewish weltanschauung

– The influence of the state on Jewish-Gentile relations outside of Israel

– The impact of the establishment of a Jewish state on world Jewry

– The relationship between global and local in Jewish history

-Comparative perspectives on diaspora nationalism and Homeland-Diaspora relations

– Israeli Arab/Palestinian conceptions of “Diaspora”

– Palestinian emigration and its representation

– Non-Jewish diaspora communities in Israel (e.g. Armenians)

– Jewish and non-Jewish migration into Israel

New Article: Sazzad, Mahmoud Darwish’s Poetry as Sumud

Sazzad, Rehnuma. “Mahmoud Darwish’s Poetry as Sumud. Palestinian Resistance to Israeli Occupation and Subjugation.” Interventions (early view; online first).

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1369801X.2015.1079493

 

Abstract

This essay makes explicit the connection between Palestinian resistance to Israeli control and the principle of sumud. Drawing on Raja Shehadeh and Ismail Shammout, I define this concept and show its strategic role in the resistance. Arguably, critics have identified Darwish’s constant pursuit of aesthetics and his deep commitment to the Palestinian cause without linking them to the narrative of sumud. I suggest that his contribution to the narrative is built on the ground that his aggressors lack the intrinsic tie to the land, which his people perennially possess. Whereas the Israelis produce mythical claims on the land, the indigenous Palestinians are like their olive trees – unswervingly there. In particular, the creativity of the people makes present their absented homeland. Darwish’s exile renders the second phenomenon more comprehensible. Even though he was physically removed from his homeland at a young age, his imagination remained implanted there throughout his life, which resulted in a rich oeuvre.

 

 

New Book: Burla and Lawrence, eds. Australia and Israel

Burla, Shahar, and Dashiel Lawrence. Australia and Israel. A Diasporic, Cultural and Political Relationship. Eastbourne: Sussex Academic Press, 2015.

 

Shahar

 

Australia and the State of Israel have maintained a cordial if at times ambiguous relationship. The two countries are geographically isolated: strategic, economic and cultural interests lie increasingly with Asia for one, and with the US and the EU for the other. But for all that divides the two states, there is also much they share. Australia played an important role in the Jewish state’s establishment in 1948, and is home to the most Zionist centered Jewish diaspora globally. Jewishness for most Australian Jews has been shaped and defined by engagement with and support for Israel. At the heart of this engagement is a small but thriving Israeli community within the larger multicultural Australia.

Australia and Israel: A Diasporic, Cultural and Political Relationship draws attention to the important historical and contemporary nexus between this diaspora and its imagined homeland. The collection also considers the ways in which these two states mobilise national myths and share environmental challenges. In recent time relations between the two states have been tested by the illegal use of Australian passports in 2010, the mysterious death of dual national Ben Zygier, and growing disquiet within the ranks of the Australian Labor Party and the Australian Greens over Israel’s handling of the Israel-Palestinian conflict. One prominent world-wide issue is the Palestinian BDS (Boycotts, Divestments and Sanctions) movement, which has attracted sympathy and support that has brought about substantive differences of opinion regarding its legitimacy within the Jewish Australian community. These issues demonstrate the multifaceted and complex picture of two very different nations, that nevertheless share an abiding connection.

 

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements
Introduction: Why the Book?
Shahar Burla and Dashiel Lawrence

Part One Australia and Israel – Diasporic Relationship

1 Rewriting the Rules of Engagement: New Australian Jewish
Connections with Israel
Dashiel Lawrence

2 The Personal, the Political and the Religious: Bnei Akiva
Australia and its Relationship with Israel
Ari Lander

3 Israeli Government and Diaspora Mobilisation: The Flotilla
to Gaza and the Australian Jewry as a Case Study
Shahar Burla

4 The Place of Hebrew and Israel Education in Australian
Jewish Schools
Suzanne Rutland and Zehavit Gross

5 The Ausraeli Approach: the Diasporic Identity of Israelis
in Australia
Ran Porat

Part Two Australia and Israel – Political and Cultural Relationship

6 Overcoming Water Scarcity and Inequity in Arid Lands:
Comparing Water Management in Australia and Israel
Dominic Skinner and Stephanie Galaitsi

7 Ben Zygier’s Story and Australia–Israel Relations
Ingrid Matthews

8 A Fight Worth Having: Rudd, Gillard, Israel and the
Australian Labor Party
Alex Benjamin Burston-Chorowicz

9 An Alliance of Forgetting: National Narratives of Legitimacy
on the Occasion of Israel–Australia’s Joint Stamp Issue
Commemorating the Battle of Beersheba
Micaela Sahhar

Part Three Australia, Israel and the Boycott Divestment and
Sanction Scheme

10 The Australian Greens and the Israeli–Palestinian Conflict
Philip Mendes

11 Academic Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions: Implications
for Australian–Israeli Relations
Ingrid Matthews and James Arvanitakis

Conclusion: First Cousinhood, Political Unease, and the Limits
of Comparison
Fania Oz-Salzberger

The Editors and Contributors
Index

 

Shahar Burla is a research Associate at the Sydney Jewish Museum. He is the author of Political Imagination in the Diaspora: The Construction of a Pro-Israeli Narrative (2013). He has received several awards, including a President’s Fellowship for outstanding PhD student, Bar-Ilan University and the Menahem Begin Foundation academic award.

Dashiel Lawrence is a doctoral candidate at the School of Historical and Philosophical Studies, University of Melbourne. His research interests include Jewish diaspora–Israel contemporary relations, and Jewish critics of Israel.

 

 

New Book: Schilling, Emotional State Theory. Friendship and Fear in Israeli Foreign Policy

Schilling, Christopher L. Emotional State Theory. Friendship and Fear in Israeli Foreign Policy. Lanham: Lexington Books, 2015.

 

schilling

 

This book develops “emotional state theory” as a new contribution to international relations theory (IR). The text addresses the State of Israel vis-à-vis the rest of the world. The rationale for this research perspective stems from the trajectory of Israeli state-building since its foundation in May 1948 to the present date. This trajectory is constructed reflecting the trauma of the past and dreams about the future. Both contribute decisively to a better understanding of the current image and position of the state of Israel. The reference builds on two great Jewish thinkers’ works, Theodor Herzl and his book The Jewish State and Sigmund Freud’s The Interpretation of Dreams.

The author argues that despite the fact that both never met, taken together their ideas lend themselves to shed light on and offer an explanation for Israel’s troubled and uncertain position in current international relations. The resulting question underlying this work on the emotionality of states and its impact on international relations is therefore “whether Israel is still in a process of dreaming” and whether it is therefore to be understood a “state which has not yet woken from the trauma of the Jewish past. Not a dream’s fulfilment of an end of the Diaspora, but a nightmare based on this experience.” Drawing on these two parallel and rather influential texts, Schilling rephrases the leading questions of this book as this: “Has Israel developed an understanding of itself which sees the country as a modern state among the nations, which is dealing with its neighbors, or rather, does Israel understand itself more as being like a ghetto that is still surrounded by a hostile world? Has Israel become a strong, self-confident country, or has it continued with the nervousness of the Diaspora Jews to become a state with an emotional problem?”.

 

Table of Contents

Chapter 1: Theoretical Framework
Chapter 2: Methodological Strategy
Chapter 3: Jewish Identity Constructions in Israel
Chapter 4: Israeli Foreign Policy
Chapter 5: Conclusion

 

Christopher L. Schilling is political scientist and lawyer.

 

 

Dissertation: Hankins | Black Musics, African Lives, and the National Imagination in Modern Israel

Hankins, Sarah Elizabeth. Black Musics, African Lives, and the National Imagination in Modern Israel. PhD Dissertation, Harvard University, 2015.

 
URL: http://dash.harvard.edu/handle/1/17467531

 
Abstract

“Black Musics, African Lives, and the National Imagination in Modern Israel,” explores the forms and functions of African and Afro-diasporic musics amidst heated public debate around ethnic identity and national membership. Focusing on musical-political activity among Ethiopian Israeli citizens, Sudanese and Eritrean refugees, and West African labor migrants in Tel Aviv, I examine how diverse types of musicking, from nightclub DJing and live performance to church services and protest concerts, voice African and Afro-descendent claims to civic status in a fractured urban environment. Grounded in ethnographic participant observation, the dissertation analyzes musical and political activity through the lens of “interpretive modes” that shape contemporary Israel’s national consciousness, and which influence African and Afro-descendant experiences within Israeli society. These include “Israeliyut,” or the valorization of so-called native Israeli cultural forms and histories; “Africani,” an emerging set of aesthetic and social values that integrates African and Afro-descendent subjectivities into existing frameworks of Israeli identity; and “glocali,” or the effort to reconcile local Israeli experience with aspects of globalization.

Tracing “blackness” as an ideological and aesthetic category through five decades of public discourse and popular culture, I examine the disruptions to this category precipitated by Israel’s 21st century encounter with African populations. I find that the dynamics of debate over African presence influence an array of mass-cultural processes, including post-Zionism, conceptions of ethnic “otherness,” and the splintering of Israel’s left into increasingly narrow interest groups. Contributing to the literature on continuity and change within urban-dwelling African diasporas, this dissertation is the first monograph exploring dramatic transformations of Israel’s highly consolidated national culture through in-depth ethnography with migrant groups.

 

 

New Article: Cohen, Changing Politics of Israel’s Diaspora Strategy

Cohen, Nir. “A Web of Repatriation: The Changing Politics of Israel’s Diaspora Strategy.” Population, Space and Place (early view; online first).

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/psp.1931

 

Abstract

Diaspora strategies were explained against the backdrop of neoliberal reforms, within which context governments in sending countries sought to mobilise skilled migrants for homeland development projects. Despite sporadic evidence that non-governmental organisations take increasingly meaningful parts in diaspora strategy-formation processes, little attention has thus far been paid to their specific roles. This paper attends to the salient contribution of non-governmental organisations to Israel’s diaspora strategy. Focusing on two recent state-assisted return programs, it argues that a greater involvement of private and civic organisations should be seen as part of broader political-economic shifts, most notably economic neoliberalisation. Since the late 1980s, organisations have partnered with the state to create a tri-sectoral ‘web of repatriation’, which is effectively responsible for the creation and implementation of return programmes. Through a critical analysis of the discourse within, and practices deployed by, this new web, the paper illustrates the changing politics of return in Israel. Specifically, it shows how partners have advanced a greater professional segmentation of (potential) returnees, prioritised those best suited for the needs of a small number of ‘economic growth engines’, and institutionalised merit-based compensation schemes. Despite their different positions and situated knowledge, both state and non-state bodies have been using similar trajectories, calling for greater privatisation, harsher selectivity, and differential rewards in Israel’s diaspora strategy.

New Article: Kislev, Multicultural Policies on Migrants’ Identification: Israeli Diaspora in the USA

Kislev, Elyakim. “The Transnational Effect of Multicultural Policies on Migrants’ Identification: The Case of the Israeli Diaspora in the USA.” Global Networks 15.1 (2015): 118-39.

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/glob.12043

Abstract

While it is difficult to gauge the effect of multicultural policies within countries, it is even more difficult to measure them across countries. In this article, I use fundamental multicultural changes that have occurred in Israeli society in recent decades as a case study, and track their effect on how Israelis who reside in the USA identify with Israel. Analysing the US census and the American Community Survey, I have focused my research on three groups of Israeli-born migrants in the USA – Israeli Arabs, ultra-Orthodox Jews and the Jewish majority. Findings indicate that originating from a minority community in the homeland predicts not only a different rate, but also different longitudinal trends of Israeli identification. I offer several possible explanations for these variations, but an in-depth analysis of the Israeli case indicates that the transnational effect of the changing multicultural agenda in Israel is the leading mechanism at play.

ToC: Journal of Jewish Education 81.2 (2015): special issue on Israel Education (Part 2)

Journal of Jewish Education, Volume 81, Issue 2, April-June 2015 is now available online is now available online on Taylor & Francis Online.

Special Issue: Israel Education, Part II

This new issue contains the following articles:

Editor’s Note
Approaching Israel Education: New Agendas
Helena Miller
Pages: 97-100

Articles
What’s in a Name? In Pursuit of Israel Education
Shlomit Attias
Pages: 101-135

Mature Zionism: Education and the Scholarly Study of Israel
Hanan A. Alexander
Pages: 136-161

Harnessing Teacher Potential as Israel Education Curriculum Developers
Meredith Katz
Pages: 162-188
The Educational Mission of the Shaliach: A Case Study in Australia
Yosef Aharonov
Pages: 189-211

Educational Travel to Israel in the Era of Globalization
Elan Ezrachi
Pages: 212-225

Book Reviews
Erik H. Cohen, Identity and Pedagogy: Shoah Education in Israeli State Schools (Academic Studies Press, Brighton, MA, 2013)
Daniel Osborn
Pages: 226-230

Jack Schneider, From the Ivory Tower to the Schoolhouse: How Scholarship Becomes Common Knowledge in Education (Harvard Education Press, Cambridge, MA, 2014)
Miriam Heller Stern
Pages: 231-235

ToC: Journal of Jewish Education 81.1 (2015); special issue: Israel Education

Journal of Jewish Education, Volume 81, Issue 1, January-March 2015 is now available online on Taylor & Francis Online.

Special Issue: Israel Education, Part I

This new issue contains the following articles:

Editor’s Note
Israel Education in Unsettled Times
Bethamie Horowitz
Pages: 1-3
DOI: 10.1080/15244113.2015.1010368

Articles
“Israel Is Meant for Me”: Kindergarteners’ Conceptions of Israel
Sivan Zakai
Pages: 4-34
DOI: 10.1080/15244113.2015.1007019

“Like a Distant Cousin”: Bi-Cultural Negotiation as Key Perspective in Understanding the Evolving Relationship of Future Reform Rabbis with Israel and the Jewish People
Michal Muszkat-Barkan & Lisa D. Grant
Pages: 35-63
DOI: 10.1080/15244113.2015.1007011

Lights, Cameras, Action Research!—Moviemaking as a Pedagogy for Constructivist Israel Education
Ofra Backenroth & Alex Sinclair
Pages: 64-84
DOI: 10.1080/15244113.2015.1003480

A Linguistic Analysis of the Role of Israel in American Jewish Schooling
Barry Chazan
Pages: 85-92
DOI: 10.1080/15244113.2015.1007016

Book Review
Sharon Feiman-Nemser, Eran Tamir, and Karen Hammerness, Editors, Inspiring Teaching: Preparing Teachers to Succeed in Mission-Driven Schools (Harvard Education Press, Cambridge, MA, 2014)
Laura Shefter
Pages: 93-96
DOI: 10.1080/15244113.2015.1003481

New Article: Smola, Utopian Space and Time in Soviet Jewish Exodus Literature

Smola, Klavdia. “The Reinvention of the Promised Land: Utopian Space and Time in Soviet Jewish Exodus Literature.” East European Jewish Affairs 45.1 (2015): 79-108.

 

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13501674.2015.992711

 

Abstract

The Jewish underground movement in the Soviet Union in the second half of the 1960s produced literature that became a part of the counterculture of Soviet dissent. For the first time in decades, Russian Jews identified, to a significant degree, as people of the galut (Jewish Diaspora). The battle for the return to Israel and the new Jewish renaissance in the intellectual sphere of the unofficial led to the emergence of new topographical concepts, which were inspired primarily by the Jewish cultural tradition. In fact, the exodus texts written in the 1960s–1980s represented a new, late Soviet shaping of Zionist prose. They relate to the symbol of the Promised Land as a fundamental projection of aspirations. Late Soviet Zionist texts share the traditional Jewish vision of Israel as an imagined topos of the original homeland that is both retrospective (with reference to the biblical promise of the land and the seizure of Canaan) and prospective (return and redemption). The Exodus story contained in Sefer Shemot becomes a leading poetic, philosophical and at times religiously charged metaphor of liberation and reunification. The re-strengthened collective memory of tradition required biblical symbols to be imbued with new semiotic power.

This paper will show that the historical dimension of the events dealt with in the literature often has strong mystical and mythological traits and displays messianic-apocalyptic hopes of salvation. However, alternative literary space and time models represented in the aliyah literature hereby betray their rootedness in the teleology of the communist regime. The powerful Israel utopia reflects both the eschatological time of the Soviet empire and its phantasms of paradise on earth. Late Soviet Zionism and totalitarian discourse are shown to be two space-time utopias.

 

 

New Book: Halperin, Babel in Zion

Halperin, Liora R. Babel in Zion. Jews, Nationalism, and Language Diversity in Palestine, 1920-1948. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2014.

 

9780300197488

 

The promotion and vernacularization of Hebrew, traditionally a language of Jewish liturgy and study, was a central accomplishment of the Zionist movement in Palestine in the years following World War I. Viewing twentieth-century history through the lens of language, author Liora Halperin questions the accepted scholarly narrative of a Zionist move away from multilingualism, demonstrating how Jews in Palestine remained connected linguistically by both preference and necessity to a world outside the boundaries of the pro-Hebrew community even as it promoted Hebrew and achieved that language’s dominance. The story of language encounters in Jewish Palestine is a fascinating tale of shifting power relationships, both locally and globally. Halperin’s absorbing study explores how a young national community was compelled to modify the dictates of Hebrew exclusivity as it negotiated its relationships with its Jewish population, Palestinian Arabs, the British, and others outside the margins of the national project and ultimately came to terms with the limitations of its hegemony in an interconnected world.

Table of Contents

Note on transliteration and translation

Acknowledgements

Introduction: Babel in Zion

Languages of Leisure in the Home, the Coffeehouse, and the Cinema

Peddlers, Traders, and the Languages of Commerce

Clerks, Translators, and the Languages of Bureaucracy

Zion in Babel: The Yishuv in Its Arabic-Speaking Context

Hebrew Education between East and West: Foreign-Language Instruction in Zionist Schools

Conclusion: The Persistence of Babel

Notes

Bibliography

Index

 

Bibliography: Leo Baeck Institute Yearbook bibliography on Zionism and Israel (2014)

Bibliography: Zionism and Israel. Published in the Leo Baeck Institute Yearbook 59 (2014): 460-466.

57203. Alroey, Gur: “Zionism without Zion”? Territorialist Ideology and the Zionist Movement, 1882–1956. [In]: Jewish Social Studies, Vol. 18(1), 2013. Pp. 1–32

57204. Al-Salim, Farid: Key to three crises: The Ha’avara Agreement, Jewish immigration, and the Peel Plan of Partition of Palestine. [In]: Journal of South Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, Vol. 37(1), 2013. Pp. 86–102

57205. Armborst-Weihs, Kerstin: The Formation of the Jewish National Movement Through Transnational Exchange: Zionism in Europe up to the First World War. [In]: Europäische Geschichte Online. http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0159–2011080820 (07.08.2014)

57206. Ashkenazi, Ofer: The Biramschule in Context – The »German« Influence on Jewish Body Culture in Mandate Palestine. [In]: Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte, Vol. 41, 2013 (Issue title: Deutsche(s) in Palästina und Israel. Alltag, Kultur, Politik. Ed. by José Brunner). Pp. 17–39

57207. Behar, Moshe; Benite, Zvi Ben-Dor (eds.): Modern Middle Eastern Jewish Thought: Writings on Identity, Politics, and Culture, 1893–1958. Waltham, MA: Brandeis University Press, 2013. XXXIX, 257 pp., ISBN 978-1-58465-884-9 / 978-1-58465-885-6 [Reviewed by: Orit Bashkin, on: https://www.h-net.org/reviews/showrev.php?id=41227 (22.05.2014). Incl. i. a.: European Zionism and the Arabs and Jews in Palestine]

57208. Ben-Ari, Nitsa: Hebrew Translations of German Classics – Attraction and Aversion. [In]: Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte, Vol. 41, 2013 (Issue title: Deutsche(s) in Palästina und Israel. Alltag, Kultur, Politik. Ed. by José Brunner). Pp. 129–142

57209. BERGMANN, ERNST DAVID. Orchin, Milton; Fenichel, Henry; Jensen, William B.: Scientist in the Service of Israel. The Life and Times of Ernst David Bergmann (1903–1975). Jerusalem: Hebrew University Magnes Press, 2011. XVIII, 374 pp., ISBN 978-965-493-580-7 [“This is the first book-length study of the life and career of the Israeli chemist Ernst David Bergmann. It traces his birth and education in Germany; his decision, after the rise of Hitler, to immigrate to Palestine rather than to accept a position at Oxford; and his intimate 18-year association with Chaim Weizmann – not only as his closest scientific associate but also as Scientific Director of both the Sieff Institute and of the Weizmann Institute …”]

57210. BERGNER, ELISABETH. Feinberg, Anat: »Von Gott begnadete Schauspielerin«: Elisabeth Bergner in Israel. [In]: Aschkenas, Vol. 21(1–2) (2011), 2013. Pp. 229–246

57211. BIRNBAUM, NATHAN. Olson, Jess: Nathan Birnbaum and Jewish Modernity: Architect of Zionism, Yiddishism, and Orthodoxy. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2013, 408 pp. (Stanford Studies in Jewish History and Culture), ISBN 978-0-8047-7873-2 [Reviewed by: Kerstin Armborst-Weihs, in: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/rezension.html (06.05.2014)]

––. BUBER, MARTIN. Wolf, Siegbert: Martin Bubers Konzeption der Binationalität (2012). See No. 55784

––. Buber, Martin: Zwei Völker in Palästina (1947). See No. 55784

57212. DUBNOW, SIMON. Jilek, Grit: Nation ohne Territorium. Über die Organisierung der jüdischen Diaspora bei Simon Dubnow. Baden-Baden: Nomos, 2013. 524 pp. (Schriftenreihe der Sektion Politische Theorien und Ideengeschichte in der Deutschen Vereinigung für Politische Wissenschaft, Vol. 24), ISBN 978-3-8329-7738-2

57213. Edelmann-Ohler, Eva: Sprache des Krieges. Deutungen des Ersten Weltkriegs in zionistischer Publizistik und Literatur (1914–1918). Zürich: ETH Zürich, 2013. 306 pp., illus. (ETH Zürich Diss. No. 20986)

57214. Eiff, Hansjörg: Die jüdische Heimstätte in Palästina in der Außenpolitik der Weimarer Republik. [In]: Zeitschrift für Geschichtswissenschaft, Vol. 61(12), 2013. Pp. 1005–1028

57215. Gechtman, Roni: Nationalising the Bund? Zionist historiography and the Jewish labour movement. [In]: East European Jewish Affairs, Vol. 43(3), 2013. Pp. 249–264 [Abstract: This article examines the academic historiography on the Jewish Workers’ Bund produced by Israeli and Zionist scholars. While the contribution of Israeli scholars to the historiography on the Bund has been significant in both quantity and quality, their works have had to grapple with the tension between the goals of Zionist historiography and the Bund’s political and ideological commitments, namely the party’s radical opposition to nationalism in general and to Zionism in particular. To various degrees, Israeli scholars sought to “nationalise” the Yiddish-speaking labour movement in Eastern Europe and incorporate it into a coherent narrative of the Jews’ past as an “organic” nation. As a result of their authors’ ideological and methodological preconceptions, and by portraying it as a nationalist movement, these works often misrepresent the Bund’s ideas, policies and activities.]

––. Graur, Mina: Anarchismus und Zionismus. Die Debatte über den jüdischen Nationalismus (2008). See No. 55784

57216. Grill, Tobias: Antizionistische jüdische Bewegungen. [In]: Europäische Geschichte Online. http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0159–2011081886 (07.08.2014)

57217. GRONEMANN, SAMMY. Kühne, Jan: “Wer ist wer?!”. Sammy Gronemanns Jakob und Christian. [In]: PaRDeS. Zeitschrift der Vereinigung für Jüdische Studien, Vol. 19, 2013 (Issue title: Galut Sepharad in Aschkenas: Sepharden im deutschsprachigen Kulturraum). Pp. 191–206 [http://opus.kobv.de/ubp/volltexte/2013/6527/ (04.09.2013)]

57218. Grüner, Frank; Hohler, Susanne: Offener Brief der zionistischen Jugendorganisation Betar an den Nationalrat der Jüdischen Gemeinden im Fernen Osten vom 25. Januar 1939. [In]: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/articles.html#artikel308

57219. Harpaz, Nathan: Zionist Architecture and Town Planning: The Building of Tel Aviv (1919–1929). West Lafayette, IN: Purdue University Press, 2013. xi, 277 pp., illus., ISBN 9781557536730

57220. Hermann, Tamar S.: Zionism and Palestinian Nationalism: Possibilities of Recognition. [In]: Israel Studies, Vol. 18(2), 2013 (Special Issue: Shared Narratives – A Palestinian-Israeli Dialogue). Pp. 133–147

57221. Herrmann, Manja: “[B]eide zu einem harmonischen Ganzen verschmolzen”: Particularism, Universalism, and the Hybrid Jewish Nation in Early German Zionist Discourse. [In]: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/articles.html#artikel323

––. HERZL, THEODOR. Ben-Ami: Herzl and the First Congress. See No. 56248

57222. HESS, MOSES; PINSKER, LEON; RÜLF, MORITZ. Schoeps, Julius H.: Pioneers of Zionism: Hess, Pinsker, Rülf. Messianism, Settlement Policy, and the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict. Translated by Margaret-Ann Schellenberg. Berlin [et al.]: de Gruyter, 2013. 158 pp., illus., ISBN 978-3-11-031458-8 [Reviewed by: Philipp von Wussow, in: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/rezension.html (06.05.2014)]

––. Hessing, Jakob: Germanistik in Israel. Aspekte einer Trauerarbeit. See No. 57755

57223. Jessen, Caroline: Bücher als Dinge. Funktionen emigrierter Bücher und Büchersammlungen für deutsch-jüdische Einwanderer in Palästina/Israel nach 1933 aus Perspektive der Kanonforschung. [In]: Exilforschung, Vol. 29, 2011. Pp. 12–27

57224. Jessen, Caroline: Das problematische Bild der geretteten Kultur – Büchersammlungen deutsch-jüdischer Einwanderer in Israel. [In]: Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte, Vol. 41, 2013 (Issue title: Deutsche(s) in Palästina und Israel. Alltag, Kultur, Politik. Ed. by José Brunner). Pp. 179

57225. Jessen, Caroline: Spuren deutsch-jüdischer Geschichte. Erschließung und Erforschung von Nachlässen und Sammlungen in Israel. [In]: Der Archivar, Vol. 66(3), 2013. Pp. 328–331

57226. Kraft, Christian: Die Synagogen Binjan Zion und Chorew – Der Konflikt zweier deutscher Einwanderergemeinden in Jerusalem. [In]: Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte, Vol. 41, 2013 (Issue title: Deutsche(s) in Palästina und Israel. Alltag, Kultur, Politik. Ed. by José Brunner). Pp. 97–126

57227. Kühne, Jan: Das Ende einer jüdischen Welttournee – Sammy Gronemann und die zionistische »Rückkehr in die Geschichte«. [In]: Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte, Vol. 41, 2013 (Issue title: Deutsche(s) in Palästina und Israel. Alltag, Kultur, Politik. Ed. by José Brunner). Pp. 143–160

57228. LASKER-SCHÜLER, ELSE; WILHELM, KURT. Kohler, George Y.: »Platzmachen für Gott« – Else Lasker-Schüler, Rabbiner Kurt Wilhelm und der religiöse Liberalismus in Palästina. [In]: Aschkenas, Vol. 21(1–2) (2011), 2013. Pp. 179–199

57229. Liebermann, Guido: La psychanalyse en Palestine 1918–1948. Aux origines du mouvement analytique israélien. Préface de Elisabeth Roudinesco. Paris: Campagne Première, 2012. 318 pp., ISBN 978-2-915789-53-9 [Incl. i. a.: L’arrivée des psychanalystes autrichiens en Palestine (1938); Traduire Freud en hébreu; Freud en Eretz Israël]

57230. Litt, Stefan: Zeugnisse deutsch-jüdischer Kulturgeschichte – Der Erwerb deutschsprachiger Privatnachlässe für die Jewish National and University Library in Jerusalem 1934–1971. [In]: Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte, Vol. 41, 2013 (Issue title: Deutsche(s) in Palästina und Israel. Alltag, Kultur, Politik. Ed. by José Brunner). Pp. 195–212

––. Luden, Josef: Israel: Zionismus & Anarchismus (1985). See No. 55784

57231. Maier-Wolthausen, Clemens: Eine unmögliche Reise. Ein Brief der Kinder- und Jugendalija in Schweden von 1940. [In]: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/articles.html#artikel308

57232. Maksymiak, Małgorzata A.: Untergangs- und Aufgangsprobleme der [sic] jüdischen Homo Europaeus. Zur zionistischen Kritik an Spenglers Geschichtsphilosophie. [In]: Zaur Gasimov; Carl Antonius Lemke Duque (Hrsg.): Oswald Spengler als europäisches Phänomen. Der Transfer der Kultur- und Geschichtsmorphologie im Europa der Zwischenkriegszeit 1919–1939. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht 2013 (Veröffentlichungen des Instituts für Europäische Geschichte Mainz, Abteilung für Universalgeschichte, Beiheft 99), ISBN 978-3-525-10126-1. Pp. 299–322

57233. Maksymiak, Malgorzata Anna: “Ezer Ke-Negdo” in Zionism: The Cases of Gerda Luft and Gabriele Tergit. [In]: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/articles.html#artikel323

57234. Maoz, Moshe: The Zionist/Jewish and Palestinian/Arab National Movements: The Question of Legitimacy – A Comparative Observation. [In]: Israel Studies, Vol. 18(2), 2013 (Special Issue: Shared Narratives – A Palestinian-Israeli Dialogue). Pp. 30–40

57235. Marzano, Arturo: Visiting British Palestine: Zionist travelers to Eretz Israel. [In]: Quest. Issues in Contemporary Jewish History, Vol. 4(6), 2013. http://www.quest-cdecjournal.it/index.php (03.03.2014)

57236. Michaels, Jennifer: An Unusual Traveler: Ida Pfeiffer’s Visit to the Holy Land in 1842. [In]: Quest. Issues in Contemporary Jewish History, Vol. 4(6), 2013. http://www.quest-cdecjournal.it/index.php (03.03.2014)

57237. Miron, Guy: Exile, Diaspora and the Promised Land: Jewish Future Images in Nazi Dominated Europe. [In]: Pál Hatos; Attila Novák (eds.): Between Minority and Majority: Hungarian and Jewish/Israeli Ethnical and Cultural Experiences in Recent Centuries. Budapest: Balassi Inst., 2013. Pp. 147–166

57238. Miskin, Edgar: Illegal Journey: From the Holocaust to Palestine in 1946. New York: Devora, 2013. 314 pp., ISBN 9789655241273

57239. MÜLLER-COHEN, ANITTA. Hecht, Dieter J.: Biographien jüdischer Frauen: Anitta Müller-Cohen (1890–1962). Sozialarbeit und Zionismus zwischen Wien und Tel Aviv. [In]: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/miscellaneous.html#artikel301

57240. Nemtsov, Jascha: Doppelt vertrieben: Deutsch-jüdische Komponisten aus dem östlichen Europa in Palästina/Israel. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 2013. 336 pp., illus., music (Jüdische Musik, Vol. 11), ISBN 978-3-447-06975-5

57241. Nittenberg, Joanna; Kaufmann, Benjamin (eds.): Trotz allem … Aron Menczer und die Jugendalijah. Wien: Edition INW, 2013. 191 pp., illus., ISBN 9783950035667 [Aron Menczer, b. 18. 04. 1917 Vienna, d. 7. 10. 1943 KZ Auschwitz-Birkenau]

57242. Or, Galia Bar; Minten-Jung, Nicole; Möller, Werner; Yasky, Yuval; Lehmann, Katja; Sonder, Ines; Oswalt, Philipp: Kibbuz und Bauhaus. Pioniere des Kollektivs. Leipzig: Spector Books, 2012. 144 S., ISBN 978-3940064448 [Reviewed by: Alexandra Klei, in: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/rezension.html (06.05.2014)]

57243. Oswalt, Philipp (ed.): bauhaus. Zeitschrift der Stiftung Bauhaus Dessau, Ausgabe 2: Israel, November 2011. 152 pp., ISBN 978-3940064295 [Reviewed by: Alexandra Klei, in: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/rezension.html (06.05.2014)]

57244. Patek, Artur: Jews on Route to Palestine 1934–1944. Sketches from the History of Aliyah Bet. Clandestine Jewish Immigration. Krakow: Jagiellonian University Press, 2012. 220 pp., ISBN 978-83-233-3390-6 [Reviewed by: Farid Al-Salim, in: American Historical Review, Vol. 119(3), 2014. Pp. 1022]

57245. Peiffer, Lorenz; Zimmermann, Moshe (eds.): Sport als Element des Kulturtransfers. Jüdische Sportler zwischen NS-Deutschland und Palästina. Göttingen: Wallstein, 2013. 249 pp., illus., ISBN 978-3-8353-1234-0 [Vorwort (Lorenz Peiffer; Moshe Zimmermann, 7–8); Einleitung (Lorenz Peiffer; Moshe Zimmermann, 9–13); Die Einsamkeit des Langstreckenläufers. Deutsch-jüdische Athleten und die Entstehung einer zionistischen (trans)nationalen Kultur (Ofer Ashkenazi, 14–48); Arthur Biram und die Einführung des Turnunterrichts in Erez Israel (Ofer Ashkenazi; Eyal Gertmann, 49–72); Die Beteiligung jüdischer Sportler aus Deutschland an der II. Makkabiah 1935 in Tel Aviv (Henry Wahlig, 73–98); Im Schatten antisemitischer Diskriminierung und Verfolgung. Sportliche Begegnungen zwischen jüdischen Mannschaften aus Nazideutschland und Erez Israel im Jahre 1937 (Eyal Gertmann; Lorenz Peiffer, 99–134); Zwischen Diaspora und Erez Israel – Fußball als Element des Kulturtransfers (Moshe Zimmermann, 135–146); »Im Turnunterricht ist ganz neu, daß man möglichst hebräische Kommandos gebrauchen möchte.« Die Veränderung des Turnunterrichts an den jüdischen Schulen im nationalsozialistischen Deutschland (Lorenz Peiffer; Nadine Werner, 147–168); Schulsport in Palästina von 1933 bis 1938 – im Spiegel von Berichten in deutsch-jüdischen Zeitungen (Lorenz Peiffer; Nadine Werner, 169–172); Dokumention. Einführung und Kommentierung der Dokumente (Ofer Ashkenazi; Eyal Gertmann; Henry Wahlig, 175–184); Dokumente: 1. Transfer von Sportarten nach Erez Israel (185); 2. Vereinsentwicklung in Erez Israel (193); 3. Jüdische Sportlerinnen und Sportler aus Deutschland bei der Makkabiah 1935 (200); 4. Sportreisen jüdischer Mannschaften nach Erez Israel nach Nazideutschland (234); 5. Sport in Palästina in den 1920er Jahren (245)]

57246. Poppe, Judith: Zwischen »unauffindbarem Gestern« und dem »Himmel voll Zuversicht«? Konzeptionen der Alten und der Neuen Heimat bei deutschsprachigen Schriftsteller/innen Israels. [In]: Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte, Vol. 41, 2013 (Issue title: Deutsche(s) in Palästina und Israel. Alltag, Kultur, Politik. Ed. by José Brunner). Pp. 161–178

––. Popper, Hans: Die freie organisierte Gemeinschaft des jüdischen Yishuv (Einwohnerschaft) in Palästina (1949). See No. 55784

57247. Rautenberg-Alianov, Viola: Schlagsahne oder Shemen-Öl? Deutsch-jüdische Hausfrauen und ihre Küche in Palästina 1936–1940. [In]: Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte, Vol. 41, 2013 (Issue title: Deutsche(s) in Palästina und Israel. Alltag, Kultur, Politik. Ed. by José Brunner). Pp. 82–96

57248. Rodov, Ilia: “With Eyes towards Zion:” Visions of the Holy Land in Romanian Synagogues. [In]: Quest. Issues in Contemporary Jewish History, Vol. 4(6), 2013. http://www.quest-cdecjournal.it/index.php (03.03.2014)

57249. Rokem, Na’ama: Prosaic Conditions: Heinrich Heine and the Spaces of Zionist Literature. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2013. XXI, 221 pp., ISBN 978-0-8101-2867-5 [Reviewed by: Allison Schachter, on: http://www.h-net.org/reviews/showpdf.php?id=42229 (19.08.2014)]

57250. Sebba-Elran, Tsafi: From Sefer Ha’aggadah to the Jewish Bookcase: Dynamics of a Cultural Change. [In]: Jewish Studies Quarterly, Vol. 20(3), 2013. Pp. 272–295 [The manifest popularity of H. N. Bialik and Y. H. Ravnitzky’s Sefer Ha’aggadah, its influence on the educational curriculum in the Yishuv and later in the State of Israel and the various languages into which it is translated all bear witness to the formative role of this book through the years in the construction of modern cultural memory … Only Sefer Ha’aggadah acquired such an influence that it became known as “the New Torah” of the Jews. This article seeks to understand and explain Bialik and Ravnitzky’s unique success in light of their literary innovations and cultural vision and to examine how they used their literary tools to bridge the historical and ideological gap between rabbinic tradition and the Jewish thought of their time … Like the romantic philosophers Herder and Schlegel, and apparently following Ahad Ha’am, Bialik and Ravnitzky related to Jewish myth and particularly to the aggadah as a national cultural heritage …]

57251. Sela-Sheffy, Rakefet: »Europeans in the Levant« Revisited – German Jewish Immigrants in 1930s Palestine and the Question of Culture Retention. [In]: Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte, Vol. 41, 2013 (Issue title: Deutsche(s) in Palästina und Israel. Alltag, Kultur, Politik. Ed. by José Brunner). Pp. 40–59

57252. Selzer, Assaf: The History of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Vol. 4: Who’s Who Prior to Statehood: Founders, Designers, Pioneers. Jerusalem: Magnes Press, 2013. 405 pp., ISBN 978-965-493-691-0

––. Shapiro, Alexander: Internationale Probleme. Palästina, England und die jüdische Frage (1930). See No. 55784

57253. Sheffi, Na’ama; Meilinger, Liliane: Vom Deutschen ins Hebräische. Übersetzungen aus dem Deutschen im Jüdischen Palästina 1882–1948. Translated by Liliane Meilinger. With a preface by Shulamit Volkov. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2011. 219 pp. (Jüdische Religion, Geschichte und Kultur, Vol. 14), ISBN 978-3-525-56938-2

57254. Shindler, Colin: The origins of Zionism. [In]: Joel Peters and David Newman (eds.): The Routledge Handbook on the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict. London [et. al.]: Routledge, 2013. ISBN 978-0-415-77862-6 / 978-0-203-07955-3. Pp. 11–19

57255. Shumsky, Dimitry: Leon Pinsker and “Autoemancipation!”: A Reevaluation. [In]: Jewish Social Studies, Vol. 18(1), 2013. Pp. 34–62

57256. Shumsky, Dimitry: Zweisprachigkeit und binationale Idee. Der Prager Zionismus 1900–1930. Transl. from the Hebrew by Dafna Mach. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2013. 336 pp. (Schriften des Simon-Dubnow-Instituts, Vol. 14), ISBN 978-352-53695-5-5 / 978-3-647-36955-6 (online resource) [Reviewed by: Martha Stellmacher. in: PaRDeS. Zeitschrift der Vereinigung für Jüdische Studien, Vol. 20, 2014. Pp. 175–176; Romy Langeheine, on: http://hsozkult.geschichte.hu-berlin.de/rezensionen/2014–2–188 (20.06.2014). “Die deutsche Übersetzung von Dimitry Shumskys 2005 an der Universität Haifa entstandener geschichtswissenschaftlicher Dissertation, die 2010 erstmalig auf Hebräisch erschien, macht nun auch der deutschen Leserschaft eine innovative Studie zum Prager Zionismus und den Anfängen der binationalen Idee als Lösungsmöglichkeit des jüdisch-arabischen Konflikts in Palästina zugänglich. Dieser Lösungsansatz wurde insbesondere von Mitgliedern des 1925 in Jerusalem gegründeten Intellektuellenzirkels Brith Schalom verfolgt, die bereits zu dieser Zeit auf die Dringlichkeit der Aussöhnung zwischen Juden und Arabern hinwiesen und verschiedene politische Programme dazu ausarbeiteten …”]

57257. Siegemund, Anja: Eine Bürgergesellschaft für den Jischuw – Deutsche liberalnationale Zionisten in Palästina. [In]: Tel Aviver Jahrbuch für deutsche Geschichte, Vol. 41, 2013 (Issue title: Deutsche(s) in Palästina und Israel. Alltag, Kultur, Politik. Ed. by José Brunner). Pp. 60–81

57258. Sonder, Ines: “Das wollten wir. Ein neues Land …” Deutsche Zionistinnen als Pionierinnen in Palästina, 1897–1933. [In]: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/articles.html#artikel323

57259. Stahl, Neta: Other and Brother: Jesus in the 20th-Century Jewish Literary Landscape. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012. 248 pp., ISBN 978-0-19-976000-8 [Reviewed by Adele Reinhartz, on: https://www.h-net.org/reviews/showrev.php?id=3D39833 (25.01.2014). Incl. i. a.: The positive appropriation of Jesus by Zionist authors like Uri Zvi Greenberg (1896–1981), Yoel Hoffman (b. 1937), Avot Yeshurun (1904–1992), and others]

––. THEILHABER, FELIX ARON. Heuer, Renate: Eroberung des neuen Judentums für Israel – Felix Aron Theilhaber. See No. 57014

––. Vago, Raphael: Israel-Diaspora Relations: Mutual Images, Expectation, Frustrations. See No. 56189

57260. Vogt, Stefan: Neue Forschungen zum deutschsprachigen Zionismus. Einleitung in den Schwerpunkt. [In]: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/articles.html#artikel323

57261. Vogt, Stefan: Vertraute Feinde. Zionisten und Konservative Revolutionäre in der Weimarer Republik. [In]: Zeitschrift für Geschichtswissenschaft, Vol. 61(9), 2013. Pp. 713–732

57262. Wendehorst, Stephan E. C.: British Jewry, Zionism and the Jewish State 1936–1956. Oxford/New York: Oxford University Press, 2012. XIV, 422 pp. (Oxford Historical Monographs), ISBN 978-0-1992-6530-5 [Reviewed by: Colin Shindler, in: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/rezension.html (06.05.2014). “Stephan E. C. Wendehorst explores the relationship between British Jewry and Zionism from 1936 to 1956, a crucial period in modern Jewish history encompassing both the shoah and the establishment of the State of Israel …” (provided by the publisher)]

57263. Wilhelm, Karin; Gust, Kerstin (eds.): Neue Städte für einen neuen Staat. Die städtebauliche Erfindung des modernen Israel und der Wiederaufbau in der BRD. Eine Annäherung. Bielefeld: transcript, 2013. 348 pp., illus. (Urban Studies), ISBN 978-3-8376-2204-1 [Incl. i. a.: Neue Städte für einen neuen Staat. Die städtebauliche Erfindung des modernen Israel und der Wiederaufbau in der BRD. Eine Annäherung (Karin Wilhelm; Kerstin Gust, 9–22); Deutsch-jüdische Identitäten in der ersten Hälfte des 20. Jahrhunderts (Andreas Nachama; Julius H. Schoeps, 25–33); Edgar Salin – Aspekte seines Lebens und Denkens (Anton Föllmi, 34–45); »Urbanität« in Zeiten der Krise: Der Basler Arbeitsrappen (Korinna Schönhärl, 46–63); » … Träume, die verwirklicht werden … « Salins Suche nach Urbanität (Karin Wilhelm, 64–79); Edgar Salin und das Israel Economic and Sociological Research Project (IESRP). Facetten einer Annäherung (Joachim Trezib, 80–94); Die Erfindung des modernen Israel und der Sharon-Plan. Betrachtungen über ein Unbehagen (Zvi Efrat, 95–111); Konzepte der Initiativplanung in den ersten Jahren des Staates Israel (Ruth Kark, 112–125); Planung einer »Heimstatt« für die Nation (Rachel Kallus, 126–1947); Städtebau und architektonische Kultur als Faktoren der israelischen Identitätspolitik nach 1948 (Anna Minta, 141–154); Edgar Salins Konzeption des modernen Kapitalismus. Von Marx, Sombart und Weber zu einer europäischen Perspektive für die Globalisierung (Bertram Schefold, 209–227); Zwischen Humanismus und Nationalismus. Die Rezeption völkisch-nationalen Denkens im deutschsprachigen Zionismus (Stefan Vogt, 228–236); Siedlung und Landvolk. Die agrarpolitischen Annäherungen zwischen Edgar Salin und der »Sering-Schule« (Willi Oberkrome, 237–251); Nachklänge völkisch-romantischer Naturaneignung? Von der Jugendbewegung des Kaiserreiches bis zur Umweltgeschichtsschreibung in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland (Joachim Wolschke-Bulmahn, 252–267); Zum Kulturdiskurs der Bundesrepublik Deutschland in den Jahren des Wiederaufbaus (Axel Schildt, 268–278); Die Kontroverse um Reparationen in Israel (Yaakov Sharett, 279–288); Von Deutschen, Juden und Projektionen. Zum deutsch-israelischen Verhältnis in der Nachkriegszeit (Moshe Zuckermann, 289–304); Kurzbiografien Autoren (337–344). Reviewed by: Alexandra Klei, in: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/rezension.html (06.05.2014); Ines Sonder, on: http://hsozkult.geschichte.hu-berlin.de/rezensionen/2014–1–203 (21.03.2014). “Im Zentrum steht die Initiative des aus Frankfurt am Main gebürtigen und seit 1927 in Basel lehrenden Nationalökonomen Edgar Salin (1892–1974). Im Rahmen der List-Gesellschaft … koordinierte Salin zwischen 1957 und 1968 das “Israel Economic and Sociological Research Project” (IESRP), kurz “Israel Research Project” genannt.”]

57264. WOLFFSOHN, DAVID. Meybohm, Ivonne: David Wolffsohn: Aufsteiger, Grenzgänger, Mediator. Eine biographische Annäherung an die Geschichte der frühen Zionistischen Organisation (1897–1914). Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2013. 384 pp. (Jüdische Religion, Geschichte und Kultur, Vol. 17), ISBN 978-3-525-57028-9 [Reviewed by: Kerstin Armborst-Weihs, in: Medaon, No. 14, 2013. http://www.medaon.de/rezension.html (06.05.2014)]

57265. Zalashik, Rakefet: Das unselige Erbe. Die Geschichte der Psychiatrie in Palästina und Israel. Frankfurt a. M.: Campus, 2012. 214 pp., ISBN 978-3-593-39361-2 [Reviewed by: Jutta Faehndrich, on: http://hsozkult.geschichte.hu-berlin.de/rezensionen/2013–3–109 (02.09.2013). “Das erste Heim für psychisch Kranke wurde Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts von philanthropischen Ehefrauen oder Töchtern führender Zionisten gegründet. Die 1895 in Jerusalem von Chaya Tzipora Pines, Rosa Feinstein und Ita Yellin gegründete Anstalt Ezrat Nashim (Frauenhilfe) blieb über 25 Jahre lang die einzige, die psychisch Kranke aufnahm. Allerdings wurde dort erst 1920 der erste ausgebildete Psychiater eingestellt, der aus Galizien stammende Dorian Feigenbaum, der bei Sigmund Freud und Emil Kraepelin studiert hatte …”]

 

Conference program: MESA, Washington, DC (22-25 Nov, 2014)

Israel Studies events at the annual conference of MESA, Washington, DC, November 22-25. For full program click here (PDF).

 

AIS–Association for Israel Studies Reception

Saturday, 11/22

Reception, 8:30-10:30pm, McKinley (M)

 

(3681) Settler-Colonialism and the Study of Zionism: Erasure, Transfer and Assimilation

Sunday, November 23, 11am-1pm

Organized by Arnon Degani

Sponsored by Palestinian American Research Center (PARC)

Chair: Gabriel Piterberg, UCLA

 

Discussant: Lorenzo Veracini, Swinburne Inst for Social Research

Susan Slyomovics, UCLA–“The Object of Memory” and Settler Colonialism Studies 16 Years Later

Honaida Ghanim, Palestinian Forum for Israeli Studies–Judaization and De-Indigenization: Settler-Colonialism in East Jerusalem

Areej Sabbagh-Khoury, Mada Al-Carmel–The Zionist Left and Settler-Colonialism in Marj Ibn ‘Amer: Land, Population and Property

Arnon Degani, UCLA–Non-Statist and Bi-Nationalist Zionism as Settler-Colonial Agendas

 

(3756) Rule of Experts?: Revolutions, Doctrines, and Interventions in the Middle East

Sunday, November 23, 2m-4pm

Organized by Osamah Khalil

 

Seth Anziska, Columbia University–Israel, the United States and the 1982 War in Lebanon

 

(3925) World War One and Its Aftermath

Sunday, November 23, 2m-4pm

Chair: Weston F Cook, Jr, UNC Pembroke

 

Roberto Mazza, Western Illinois U–Cemal Pasha, Zionism and the Alleged Expulsion of the Jews from Jaffa in April 1917

 

(3792) Israel Studies in the Arab World

Sunday, November 23, 4:30m-6:30pm

Organized by Johannes Becke

Discussant: Elie Podeh, Hebrew U of Jersusalem

 

Hassan A. Barari, U Jordan–Israelism: Arab Scholarship on Israel, a Critical Assessment

Mostafa Hussein, Brandeis U–Israel Studies in the Arab World Between Two Dictums: ‘Whosoever Learns People’s Language Avoids Their Plot’ and ‘Know Your Enemy’

Johannes Becke, U Oxford–Hebrew in Beirut: Studying Israel in the Last Arab Frontline State

Hebatalla Taha, U Oxford–The Politics of ‘Normalisation’: The Israeli Academic Centre in Cairo

Amr Yossef, American U Cairo–Egyptian Israelists: The View from Israel

 

(3886) Social Media, the Digital Archive, and Scholarly Futures

Sunday, November 23, 4:30m-6:30pm

Organized by Ted Swedenburg

Chair/Discussant: Elliott Colla, Georgetown U

 

Rebecca L. Stein, Duke U–The Perpetrator’s Archive: Israel’s Occupation on YouTube

 

 

(4006) Special Session

Abandoned Yet Central: Gaza and the Resolution of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

Sunday, November 23, 4:30m-6:30pm

Organized by Sara Roy

Chair: Sara Roy, Harvard University

 

Chris Gunness, UNRWA, Office of the Commissioner General, Jerusalem

Paul Aaron, Political Analyst and Consultant, Gaza Community Mental Health Program

Bill Corcoran, American Near East Refugee Aid (ANERA)

Ilana Feldman, George Washington University

Brian Barber, University of Tennessee

Susan Akram, Boston University School of Law

 

This session will present an overview of the past summer’s violent clashes between Israeli and Hamas forces and the ensuing destruction in Gaza. Representatives from the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) and the American Near East Refugee Aid (ANERA) will provide an “on-the-ground” analysis of the destruction and human toll of the 50-day war. Scholars will further place the recent violence in the context of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and examine the prerequisites for a sustainable resolution of the conflict.

 

 

 

(3737) Religious Inclusivity and Civilizational Identity: Expanding Iranian Identities Along Religious, Ethnic, and Gender Lines

Monday, November 24, 8:30am-10:30am

Organized by Lior Sternfeld

Chair/Discussant: Mohamad Tavakoli-Targhi, U Toronto

 

Lior Sternfeld, U Texas Austin–Iran is My Homeland, Jerusalem is My Qiblah: Iranian Jews Between Zionist and Iranian Identities

 

(3643) Israel, the United States and a Changing Middle East

Monday, November 24, 11am-1pm

Organized by Robert O. Freedman

Sponsored by Association for Israel Studies

Chair/Discussant: Robert O. Freedman, Johns Hopkins U

 

Eyal Zisser, Tel Aviv U–Israel and the Arab World – Who’s First – Syria, Egypt or Lebanon?

Ilan Peleg, Lafayette Col–Israel, Netanyahu & the Palestinians: Is the Third Term the Charm?!

Rami Ginat, Bar Ilan U–The Israeli-Egyptian-American Strategic Triangle: A Reassessment in Light of the Arab Uprising

Joshua Teitelbaum, Bar-Ilan U–Israel and the Gulf Cooperation Council: New Opportunities for Cooperation?

Uzi Rabi, Tel Aviv U–Iran and Israel: Post 2013 Elections

 

 

(3697) Bridging the Rupture of 1948: The “Decolonization” and Erasure of Mandate Palestine

Monday, November 24, 2:30pm-4:30pm

Organized by Jeffrey D. Reger and Leena Dallasheh

Sponsored by Palestinian American Research Center (PARC)

Chair: Zachary Lockman, New York U

Discussant: Shira Robinson, George Washington U

 

Jeffrey D. Reger, Georgetown U–Uprooting Palestine: Olive Groves, Mass Dispossession, and Peasant Resistance, 1945-1955

Hilary Falb Kalisman, UC Berkeley–Learning Exile: Palestinian Students and Educators Abroad, 1940-1958

Leena Dallasheh, Rice U–Defying the Rupture, Affirming Presence: Palestinians in Nazareth Surviving 1948

Rephael Stern, Princeton U–Israel’s Postcolonial Predicament and Its Contradicting Jurisdictional Claims in 1948

 

 

(3917) Perilous Peacemaking: Israeli-Palestinian Relations Since Oslo

Monday, November 24, 5pm-7pm

Chair: Timothy Schorn, U South Dakota

 

Elie Podeh, Hebrew U Jerusalem–Missed Opportunities in the Arab-Israeli Conflict: The Case of the Arab Peace Initiative (2002-2014)

Maia Carter Hallward, Kennesaw State U–Choosing to Negotiate Under Sub-Optimal Conditions: The 2013 Israeli-Palestinian Negotiations

Gabriele Mombelli, U Florence–The Palestinian National Authority Security Sector: An Operational Overview

Karam Dana, U Washington–Twenty Years after Oslo: What Do Palestinians Think?

Andrew Barwig, Department of State–“New Blood” in Israel’s Knesset: Elite Circulation and Parliamentary Resilience

 

 

 

(3867) Urbanism and the Politics of the Mandate Period, Local versus Imperial Interests

Tuesday, November 25, 11am-1pm

Organized by Harrison Guthorn

Chair: Elizabeth F. Thompson, U Virginia

 

Noah Hysler Rubin, Bezalel Academy of Art and Design–Planning Palestine: British and Zionist Plans for Tiberius and Nathanya

 

(3893) Public Opinion in the Middle East

Tuesday, November 25, 11am-1pm

Organized by Yael Zeira

 

Devorah Manekin, Arizona State U–Carrots and Sticks: Policy Instruments and Public Opinion in the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

 

(3919) Palestinian Resistance: Spaces and Standpoints

Tuesday, November 25, 11am-1pm

Chair: Timothy Schorn, U South Dakota

 

Timothy Seidel, American U–Narrating Nonviolence: Postcolonial Interrogations of Resistance in Palestine

Maya Rosenfeld, Hebrew U Jerusalem–The Movement of Palestinian Political Prisoners and the Struggle Against the Israeli Occupation: A Historical Perspective

Sharri Plonski, SOAS U London–Transcending Bounded Space: The Struggle for Land and Space by the Palestinian Citizens of Israel

Julie Norman, McGill U–Prisoners Dilemma?: Prison-Based Resistance and the Diffusion of Activism in Palestine

Maryam Griffin, UC Santa Barbara–Movement as/and Non-Movement in Palestine

 

(3949) Transnational Cultural Production

Tuesday, November 25, 1:30pm-3:30pm

Chair: Zeynep Seviner, U Washington

 

Isra Ali, Rutgers, State U of New Jersey–Adaptation: Cultural Alliances and Television Production in Israel and the United States

Robert Lang, U Hartford–Ari Folman’s Waltz with Bashir: Whose Trauma?

New Article: Rebhun, Israeli Émigrés in the United States and Europe Compared

Rebhun, Uzi. “Immigrant Acculturation and Transnationalism: Israelis in the United States and Europe Compared.” Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 53.3 (2014): 613-35.

URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jssr.12135/abstract

Abstract

This article examines relations between social integration into host societies, religio-ethnic acculturation into group belonging, and ties to home country among Israeli émigrés in the United States and Europe. I use data from a 2009–2010 Internet survey into which I incorporated country-contextual characteristics. The results of multivariate analyses show that a social integration combining duration of residence abroad and local citizenship enhances religio-ethnic identification. Another measure of integration, social networks, deters group behaviors. All measures of general integration inhibit attachment to the home country, whereas religio-ethnic acculturation is largely insignificant for transnationalism. The religiosity of the new country does not influence immigrants’ religio-ethnic patterns or homeland attachment. Insofar as group size is a significant determinant of particularistic behaviors, it weakens them. The more policy-based opportunities newcomers receive, the more they dissociate from group behaviors and homeland ties. Irrespective of individual and contextual factors, living in the United States encourages group affiliation more than living in Europe does. The results are discussed in reference to four working hypotheses—marginalization, integration, assimilation, and separation—and from a U.S.-European comparative perspective.

 

New Book: Ben-Rafael et al, eds. Reconsidering Israel-Diaspora Relations

Ben-Rafael, Eliezer, Judit Bokser Liwerant, and Yosef Gorny, eds. Reconsidering Israel-Diaspora Relations, Jewish Identities in a Changing World, 22. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2012.

 

67146

 

Table of Contents

 

Introduction
PART I. JEWISH PEOPLEHOOD: CHANGING PATTERNS OF ISRAEL-DIASPORA RELATIONS

1. Sergio Della Pergola: Jewish Peoplehood: Hard, Soft, and Interactive Markers
2. Jonathan D. Sarna: From World-Wide People to First-World People: The Consolidation (fn. concentration) of World Jewry
3. Shulamit Reinharz: The “Jewish Peoplehood” Concept: Complications and Suggestions
4. Yosef Gorny: Ethnicity and State Policy: The State of Israel in the Intellectual and Political Discourse of the US Jewish Press
5. Ephraim Yuchtman-Ya’ar and Steven M. Cohen: Close and Distant: The Relations between Israel and the Diaspora

PART II. RELIGIOSITY AND ETHNICITY

6. Yael Israel-Cohen: The Reform and Conservative Movements in Israel: Strategies of Peripheral Movements in a Monopolized Religious Market
7. Shlomo Fischer: Two Orthodox Cultures: “Centrist” Orthodoxy and Religious Zionism
8. Margalit Bejarano: Ethnicity and Transnationalism: Latino Jews in Miami
9. Nissim Leon: Strong Ethnicity: The Case of US-born Jews in Israel

PART III. GENDER AND GENERATION

10. Judith Tydor Baumel-Schwartz: Orthodox Jewish Women as a Bridge Between Israel and the Diaspora
11. Florinda Goldberg: Gender, Religion, and the Search for a Modern Jewish Identity in “La Rabina” by Silvia Plager
12. Erik H. Cohen: Global Jewish Youth Studies – Towards a Theory
13. Sylvia Barack Fishman: Generational and Cultural Constructions of Jewish Peoplehood

PART IV. ISRAELOPHOBIA, ANTI-ZIONISM AND “NEO”-ANTISEMITISM

14. Shmuel Trigano: Debasing Praise: Hatred of the Jews in a Global Age
15. Chantal Bordes-Benayoun: Integration and Antisemitism: The Case of French Jewry
16. Julius H. Schoeps: How Antisemitism, Obsessive Criticism of Israel, and Do-Gooders Complicate Jewish Life in Germany
17. Leonardo Senkman: Anti-Zionist Discourse of the Left in Latin America: An Assessment.
18. Uzi Rebhun, Chaim I. Waxman, Nadia Beider: American Jews and the Israeli-Palestinian Peace Process: A Study of Diaspora in International Affairs

PART V. CONFIGURATIONS OF WORLD JEWRY AND THE STATE OF ISRAEL

19. Judit Bokser-Liwerant: Jewish Diaspora and Transnationalism: Awkward (Dance) Partners?
20. Lars Dencik: The Dialectics of Diaspora in Contemporary Modernity
21. Gabi Sheffer: Reflections on Israel and Jerusalem as the Centers of World Jewry
22. Eliezer Ben-Rafael: Israel-Diaspora Relations: “Transmission Driving-belts” of Transnationalism

Epilogue: One – After All….for the time being

 

New Article: Zelkovitz, The Rise and Fall of the Palestinian Community in Kuwait

Ido Zelkovitz, “A Paradise Lost? The Rise and Fall of the Palestinian Community in Kuwait.” Middle Eastern Studies 50.1 (2014): 86-99.

 

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/00263206.2013.849695

 

Abstract

The article discusses the evolution of the Palestinian community in Kuwait in the wake of the 1948 War. The demand for skilled labour facilitated the gradual integration of the Palestinians into Kuwaiti society, especially in the education system and state institutions. In this regard the article examines the role of education and students in creating personal and political socio-economic networks. The relatively liberal political atmosphere in Kuwait during its years of development transformed it into a hotbed for Palestinian political activism. This trend continued up to the 1991 Gulf War, when Yasir Arafat’s support of Saddam Husayn in that wa, caused the fall from grace of the Palestinians in Kuwait. This ended the central role that the Palestinians played in the historical process of Kuwait state building. Following the death of Arafat the PLO began to seek reconciliation with Kuwait. At this timely moment in the history of relations between these two communities, the article sheds light on these efforts.

New Article: Lainer-Vos, Israel in the Poconos: Simulating the Nation in a Zionist Summer Camp

Lainer-Vos, Dan. “Israel in the Poconos: Simulating the Nation in a Zionist Summer Camp.” Theory and Society 43.1 (2014): 91-116.

 

URL: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/klu/ryso/2014/00000043/00000001/00009210

 

Abstract

This article develops a theory of simulation as a nation building mechanism by exploring the production of national belonging in Massad, a Jewish-American summer camp that operated in the Pocono Mountains, Pennsylvania, between 1941 and 1981. Trying to inspire campers to Zionism, the camp organizers shaped Massad as a “mini Israel.” This simulation engendered national attachments by lending credence to the belief that others, in Israel, experience more authentic national belonging. Rather than tempting campers to imagine the nation as a “horizontal camaraderie” (Anderson 1991), national simulations allow members to account for their distinct and often ambivalent position from within the nation. From this perspective, nation building is not simply a matter of relativizing internal differences and dramatizing differences between the groups that make up the nation and “outsiders.” Instead, nation building also is centrally a matter of creating institutional routines and practices that allow members to account for their differential position from within the nation.