ToC: Israel Journal of Foreign Affairs 9,1 (2015)

Israel Journal of Foreign Affairs, in its first publication with Routledge, is pleased to announce a new issue:

 

From the Editor

Dr. Laurence Weinbaum, Chief Editor

pages 1-2

Huntington’s “Clash of Civilizations” in Europe: From Controversial Theory to Grim Reality
Oded Eran
pages 3-6

 

Israel  Affairs
Israel’s National Security: Challenges and Assets
Dan Schueftan
pages 7-28
The Delegitimization of Israel: Diplomatic Warfare, Sanctions, and Lawfare
Matthew S. Cohen & Charles D. Freilich
pages 29-48
Middle Eastern Currents
Cracks in the Crescent: The Looming Sectarian Clash between Khilafah and Imamah
Dimitar Mihaylov
pages 49-61
Iran and the Arab Gulf States: Change amidst Continuity
Yoel Guzansky
pages 63-74
Bilateral Relations
Israel and Cuba: A New Beginning?
Margalit Bejarano
pages 75-85
Reflections on Czech–Israeli Relations in Light of EU Policies
Lubomír Zaorálek
pages 87-89
Jewish Affairs
Holocaust Restitution: The End Game II?
Aharon Mor
pages 91-97
Reviews
The Journey to the Arab Spring: The Ideological Roots of the Middle East Upheaval in Arab Liberal Thought, by David Govrin
Nir Boms, Research Fellow
pages 99-102
Egyptian Foreign Policy from Mubarak to Morsi: Against the National Interest, by Nael M. Shama
Terry Newman
pages 103-106
The Next War between Israel and Egypt: Examining a High-intensity War between two of the Strongest Militaries in the Middle East, by Ehud Eilam
David Rodman
pages 107-108
Iranian Foreign Policy during Ahmadinejad: Ideology and Actions, by Maaike Warnaar & Iranian Foreign Policy since 2001: Alone in the World, edited by Thomas Juneau and Sam Razavi
Aryeh Levin
pages 109-115
The Hague Odyssey: Israel’s Struggle for Security on the Front Lines of Terrorism and Her Battle for Justice at the United Nations, by Richard D. Heiderman
Howard M. Weisband
pages 117-121
Uncivil War: The Israel Conflict in the Jewish Community, by Keith Kahn-Harris
Robbie Sabel
pages 123-126
Britain’s Moment in Palestine: Retrospect and Perspectives, 1917–48, by Michael J. Cohen
Aharon Klieman
pages 127-131
Nazis, Islamists, and the Making of the Modern Middle East, by Barry Rubin and Wolfgang G. Schwanitz
Matthias Küntzel
pages 133-137
Diary of a Foreign Minister, by Bob Carr
Jeremy Jones
pages 139-142
Jews and the Military: A History, by Derek J. Penslar
Stephen G. Fritz
pages 143-145
Armed Political Organizations: From Conflict to Integration, by Benedetta Berti
Rashmi Singh, Lecturer
pages 147-150
Dynamics of Asymmetric Territorial Conflict: The Evolution of Patience, by Uri Resnick
Melanie Carina Schmoll
pages 151-153
Letters
Letters by Daphna Sharfman, Simon Geissbühler, and Yisrael Medad
pages 155-160

New Article: Šmok, Jewish Social Assistance Networks in Communist Czechoslovakia

Šmok, Martin. “‘Every Jew is a Zionist, and Every Zionist is a Spy!’ The Story of Jewish Social Assistance Networks in Communist Czechoslovakia.” East European Jewish Affairs 44.1 (2014): 70-83.

 

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13501674.2014.904586

 

Abstract

This article explores some of the major operations of the Czechoslovak secret police (State Security Forces, StB) against individuals involved in organising Jewish social assistance networks during the 1950s, as documented by fragments of case files preserved in the Security Services Archive in Prague. While there is much focus on victims of the Prague show trial of the so-called “Conspiracy Centre,” all of whom were members of the top echelons of the Communist Party, the individuals who tried to revive Jewish life and secure the well-being of the needy in a country swept by anti-Jewish sentiment raked up by that trial remain largely unknown. In this work, we learn who these people were and what they did, and how the Communist regime punished them for their involvement. As an original contribution, the article details the search for safe methods of delivering humanitarian aid to Czechoslovak Holocaust survivors after the expulsion of the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC) in 1950, from the initial attempts to use Israeli channels to the gradual legalisation of JDC aid under Swiss cover organisations.

New Article: Lichtenstein, Prague Zionists and the Paris Peace Conference

Lichtenstein, Tatjana. “Jewish Power and Powerlessness: Prague Zionists and the Paris Peace Conference.” East European Jewish Affairs 44.1 (2014): 2-20.

 

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13501674.2014.904583

 

Abstract

This article explores how perceptions of Jewish power shaped the negotiations between Czechoslovak leaders and Jewish minority representatives at the time of the Paris Peace Conference. In the aftermath of the First World War, Prague-based Zionists embarked on a mission to convince Czechoslovak elites that attacks on Jews were detrimental to the internal stability of the new state and to Czechoslovak interests abroad. As Edvard Beneš, the head of the Czechoslovak delegation in Paris, worked to cultivate an image of the new state as more “Western” and “civilised” than other successor states – a strategy meant to garner international support for Czechoslovak territorial demands and its projected absorption of large minority populations – Jewish activists encouraged his uncertainty with regard to Jews’ influence on Western audiences and statesmen. They did so in order to convince him to accept their demands for special protection clauses for the new country’s Jews. The paper thus shows that the unprecedented victimisation of Jews and the upsurge in antisemitism during and after the war coexisted with a new bold and public Jewish activism. Yet, Jewish leaders did not in the end have the ability to convince Beneš and his colleagues to give in to international Jewish demands for special protection. Instead, they sought to cultivate a strategic alliance between the state’s Czech elite and the Jewish minority which centred on the claim that Czechoslovakia was a particularly welcoming and tolerant place for Jews, an image that would evolve into a significant component of the myth of Czechoslovakia as an island of democracy in Eastern Europe.