ToC: Israel Studies Review 30.2 (2015)

Israel Studies Review 30.2 (2015)

Editors’ Note

Editors’ Note
pp. v-vi(2)

 

Articles

Does Israel Have a Navel? Anthony Smith and Zionism
pp. 28-49(22)
Author: Berent, Moshe

 

Book Reviews

Book Reviews
pp. 130-155(26)

New Article: Muszkat-Barkan, Teachers’ Perceptions and Practices Regarding Prayer Education in TALI Day Schools in Israel

Muszkat-Barkan, Michal. “Between Ritual and Spiritual: Teachers’ Perceptions and Practices Regarding Prayer Education in TALI Day Schools in Israel.” Journal of Jewish Education 81.3 (2015): 260-84.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15244113.2015.1065631

 

Abstract

The aim of this qualitative study is to describe teachers’ perceptions and roles in prayer education in TALI day schools in Israel, using in-depth oral Interviews, written questionnaires and written materials of the schools’ network. Two educational ideologies were identified: Belonging to the Jewish collective and Personal-spiritual ideology. While participants perceive the aim of Jewish education as enhancing students’ belonging to the Jewish collective, prayer education introduces a personal-spiritual aspect that was not typically a part of teachers’ discourse on Jewish education.

 

 

Podcast: Stav and Farber on Marriage and Conversion in Israel

As part of its ongoing series on “Jewish Ideals & Current Dilemmas in Contemporary Zionism,” the Tikvah Overseas Seminars hosted two of Israel’s leading rabbinic activists, David Stav and Seth Farber to discuss recent legislation regarding marriage and conversion in Israel.

 

 

They have worked together to promote bills that will allow greater numbers of municipal rabbis to register couples for marriage and perform conversions under the auspices of Israel’s Chief Rabbinate. While heralded by some as an opportunity to prevent intermarriage by increasing the number of Israelis recognized as Jews, these initiatives have been criticized by others as further entrenchment of the Chief Rabbinate’s monopoly over marriage and conversion. Their conversation highlights disagreements regarding civil marriage in Israel, conversion standards, and the ability of Jewish law to evolve. More broadly, their positions reflect different approaches toward reducing the tensions between the Jewish and democratic characters of the State of Israel.

The event was recorded on February 6, 2015. It is also available as a podcast via iTunes or Stitcher.

 

New Article: Freud-Kandel, The Holocaust in the Theology of Louis Jacobs

Freud-Kandel, Miri. “Many Questions, Few Answers: The Holocaust in the Theology of Louis Jacobs.” Journal of Modern Jewish Studies 14.1 (2015): 40-57.

 

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14725886.2015.1005879

 

Abstract

Louis Jacobs identified the Holocaust—and the creation of Israel—as the two most significant events influencing contemporary Jewish consciousness. Yet his engagement with the theological implications of the Holocaust is notably limited. Since many of his writings are focused on issues facing those he termed “the Jew in the pew,” this absence of detailed consideration of the theological questions posed by the Holocaust seems particularly perplexing. This paper will consider if there is an explanation for this lacuna.

New Book: Ben-Rafael et al, eds. Reconsidering Israel-Diaspora Relations

Ben-Rafael, Eliezer, Judit Bokser Liwerant, and Yosef Gorny, eds. Reconsidering Israel-Diaspora Relations, Jewish Identities in a Changing World, 22. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2012.

 

67146

 

Table of Contents

 

Introduction
PART I. JEWISH PEOPLEHOOD: CHANGING PATTERNS OF ISRAEL-DIASPORA RELATIONS

1. Sergio Della Pergola: Jewish Peoplehood: Hard, Soft, and Interactive Markers
2. Jonathan D. Sarna: From World-Wide People to First-World People: The Consolidation (fn. concentration) of World Jewry
3. Shulamit Reinharz: The “Jewish Peoplehood” Concept: Complications and Suggestions
4. Yosef Gorny: Ethnicity and State Policy: The State of Israel in the Intellectual and Political Discourse of the US Jewish Press
5. Ephraim Yuchtman-Ya’ar and Steven M. Cohen: Close and Distant: The Relations between Israel and the Diaspora

PART II. RELIGIOSITY AND ETHNICITY

6. Yael Israel-Cohen: The Reform and Conservative Movements in Israel: Strategies of Peripheral Movements in a Monopolized Religious Market
7. Shlomo Fischer: Two Orthodox Cultures: “Centrist” Orthodoxy and Religious Zionism
8. Margalit Bejarano: Ethnicity and Transnationalism: Latino Jews in Miami
9. Nissim Leon: Strong Ethnicity: The Case of US-born Jews in Israel

PART III. GENDER AND GENERATION

10. Judith Tydor Baumel-Schwartz: Orthodox Jewish Women as a Bridge Between Israel and the Diaspora
11. Florinda Goldberg: Gender, Religion, and the Search for a Modern Jewish Identity in “La Rabina” by Silvia Plager
12. Erik H. Cohen: Global Jewish Youth Studies – Towards a Theory
13. Sylvia Barack Fishman: Generational and Cultural Constructions of Jewish Peoplehood

PART IV. ISRAELOPHOBIA, ANTI-ZIONISM AND “NEO”-ANTISEMITISM

14. Shmuel Trigano: Debasing Praise: Hatred of the Jews in a Global Age
15. Chantal Bordes-Benayoun: Integration and Antisemitism: The Case of French Jewry
16. Julius H. Schoeps: How Antisemitism, Obsessive Criticism of Israel, and Do-Gooders Complicate Jewish Life in Germany
17. Leonardo Senkman: Anti-Zionist Discourse of the Left in Latin America: An Assessment.
18. Uzi Rebhun, Chaim I. Waxman, Nadia Beider: American Jews and the Israeli-Palestinian Peace Process: A Study of Diaspora in International Affairs

PART V. CONFIGURATIONS OF WORLD JEWRY AND THE STATE OF ISRAEL

19. Judit Bokser-Liwerant: Jewish Diaspora and Transnationalism: Awkward (Dance) Partners?
20. Lars Dencik: The Dialectics of Diaspora in Contemporary Modernity
21. Gabi Sheffer: Reflections on Israel and Jerusalem as the Centers of World Jewry
22. Eliezer Ben-Rafael: Israel-Diaspora Relations: “Transmission Driving-belts” of Transnationalism

Epilogue: One – After All….for the time being

 

Reviews: Israel-Cohen, Between Feminism and Orthodox Judaism

Israel-Cohen, Yael. Between Feminism and Orthodox Judaism. Resistance, Identity, and Religious Change in Israel. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2012.

 

53943

 

 

Reviews

 

  • Bahreini, Faezeh. “Review.” Gender and Society 27.4 (2013): 590-592.
  • Bar-Ilan, Margalit Shilo. “Review.” Shofar 32.2 (2014): 144-146.
  • Millen, Rochelle L. “Review.” Journal of Modern Jewish Studies 13.2 (2014): 311-312.

New Article: Laznow, Life Stories of Women Rabbis Living and Working in Israel

Laznow, Jacqueline. ” ‘Many Women Have Done Nobly, but You Surpass Them All’: Life Stories of Women Rabbis Living and Working in Israel.” Nashim 26 (2014): 97-121.

 

URL: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/nashim/v026/26.laznow.html

 

Abstract

The ordination of women as rabbis is a relatively new phenomenon in Jewish communities worldwide, but especially in the State of Israel. Israel’s non-Orthodox movements began to ordain women as rabbis only twenty years after the first woman rabbi was ordained in the United States. Today, women rabbis continue to confront deeply rooted cultural concepts and stereotypes while seeking to reshape the place of women in Judaism. In this article, I shall analyze and interpret Israeli women rabbis’ shared experiences as extracted from their life stories, using folklore research tools. Analyzing these stories using the narrative-package model revealed their commonalities with Vladimir Propp’s fairy-tale narrative structure. The content of these narratives by pioneer Israeli women rabbis emphasizes the deconstruction of gender roles in Judaism and in Israeli society, even as new structures are being established, enabling women to take religious leadership functions upon themselves. The narrators are aware of the numerous challenges they face, but most of them are deeply motivated to continue exerting their influence in different areas of Israeli society.

Cite: Golinkin and Eisen, Remarks at the 2008 Rabbinical Assembly Convention

David Golinkin, “Israel at Sixty: Remarks at the 2008 Rabbinical Assembly Convention,” Conservative Judaism 61,3 (2010): 26-34

and

Arnold Eisen, “Israel at Sixty: Remarks at the 2008 Rabbinical Assembly Convention,” Conservative Judaism 61,3 (2010): 35-39

URL: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/conservative_judaism/summary/v061/61.3.golinkin.html

Conference: Israel as a Jewish State

Israel as a Jewish State

The Joseph and Alma Gildenhorn Institute for Israel Studies, University of Maryland

March 7-8, 2010

URL for Registraton: http://www.israelstudies.umd.edu/conference/index.html

Ever since Theodore Herzl’s time, argument has raged over the meaning of the “Jewish State”. Much of it has focused on the appropriate role of religion in the state’s laws and practices.

With the growth of religiosity in the state and the sharp increase in the number of religious citizens – neither development foreseen by Israel’s founders – the arguments have become fiercer. Different streams of Jewish practice – Haredi, Modern Orthodox, conservative, Reform, and “secular” compete either for recognition or to delegitimize their rivals.

Meanwhile, many citizens define themselves as simply “Israeli” rather than “Jewish”.

This conference will address the provocative themes of the nature and role of democracy, identity and Jewish religion in the Israeli context. How can Israel balance the competing claims of its Jewish self-definition with a commitment to democratic pluralism? Moreover, how can it best choose among frequently contradictory religious and social values, a path that all its citizens can live with?


Program:

Sunday March 7

Tyser Auditorium,
Van Munching Hall (Smith School of Business),
University of Maryland, College Park.



8:30am-9:00am
Breakfast (coffee and pastries) and registration



9:00am-9:15am
Welcome and opening



9:15am-11:00am
Session 1:

Is Israel “ the Jewish State”?

How the avowed Jewish character of Israel influences – or should influence – the politics and government of the State

  • Professor Shlomo Fischer,
    Van Leer Institute, Jerusalem
  • Professor Shlomo Hasson,
    The Hebrew University, Jerusalem
  • Dr. Bernard Avishai,
    The Hebrew University, Author, Jerusalem
  • Profesor Amiel Ungar,
    Journalist, Tekoa, West Bank



11:00am-11:15am
Break



11:15am-12:00pm
Keynote address

  • Professor Yuli Tamir,
    Member of Knesset and former Minister of Education
    ,
    Tel Aviv



12:15pm-1:45pm
Lunch



1:45pm-3:30pm
Session 2:

Do Jews in Israel Have Religious Freedom?
The Issue of Pluralism

The competing goals and values of semi-official religious Orthodoxy and those of secular and non-orthodox religious groups and interests

  • Rabbi Tamar Elad-Appelbaum,
    Schechter Rabbinical Seminary, Jerusalem
  • Rabbi Avi Shafran,
    Agudath Israel, New York
  • Professor Bernard Cooperman,
    University of Maryland
  • Chair: Professor Eric Zakim,
    University of Maryland



3:30pm-4:00pm
Break



4:00pm-5:45pm
Session 3:

Religion and Democracy in Israel:
Are Judaism and Democratic Values Compatible?

Are citizens’ rights unacceptably diminished by Israel’s Jewish character?

  • Dr. Aviad Hacohen,
    Van Leer Institute and The Hebrew University, Jerusalem
  • Professor Yoram Peri,
    Gildenhorn Institute, University of Maryland
  • Rabbi Stuart Weinblatt,
    Israel Advocacy Office of the Rabbinical Assembly, Washington, D.C.
  • Dr. Phyllis Chesler
    Psychologist and Author. New York



5:45pm-6:00pm
Break



6:00pm-7:00pm

Annual Elizabeth and Richard Dubin Lecture
and Ambassador’s Reception

  • His Excellency Michael Oren,
    Ambassador of Israel to the United States



7:00pm-8:00pm
Reception


Monday March 8

Woodrow Wilson Center for Scholars,
Ronald Reagan Building, Washington, D.C.



Noon – 2:30pm
Session 4:

Luncheon
Religion and the Israel-Palestinian Conflict

Religious values and ideologies – Jewish, Muslim, Christian – and their consequences for the Israeli-Palestinian conflict

  • Professor Yuli Tamir,
    Member of Knesset and former Israeli Minister of Education, Tel Aviv
  • Professor Shibley Telhami,
    Anwar Sadat Chair, University of Maryland
  • Professor Edward Luttwak,
    Center for Strategic and International Studies,
    Washington, D.C.
  • Chair: Professor Yoram Peri,
    Gildenhorn Institute, University of Maryland