New Article: Joronen, Ill Treatment of Palestinian Children under the Israeli Military Order

Joronen, Mikko. “Politics of Precarious Childhood: Ill Treatment of Palestinian Children under the Israeli Military Order.” Geopolitics 21.1 (2016): 92-114.

 

URL: https://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14650045.2015.1123251

 

Abstract

This paper examines the corollaries of the exceptional treatment of Palestinian children under the Israeli military rule. It is shown how the widespread and systematic ill treatment of Palestinian children accrues from exceptional provisions and lack of legal cover of the Israeli military law. Such lack constitutes a precarious condition under which Palestinian children are not treated as children but as a security threat legally accountable for their acts, in many respects with ways similar to adults. Precarity, the paper argues, is produced through three conditions. First, the lack of protection is institutionalised through the legal, territorial and population-regulating techniques internal to state channels. Second, the lack of protection delegates significant power to the discretion of what Judith Butler calls the ‘petty sovereigns’ – to the soldiers, interrogators, police officers, etc., who are asked to rely on their own judgment when making decisions on the fundamental matters regarding the order and justice, even life and death of children. Third, the use of discretionary power is not only encouraged by the legal system and its exceptions; it also works in tandem with the institutional culture of impunity that accepts the violent disciplining, even torture, of Palestinian children.

 

 

 

New Article: Taub, Educational Reform Affecting Teachers’ Motivation

Taub, Ronit. “A New Educational Reform in Israeli High Schools Affecting Teachers’ Motivation and Perception of the Teaching Profession.” Procedia – Social and Behavioral Sciences 209.3 (2015): 503-508.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sbspro.2015.11.279

 

Extract

In 2011, a new educational reform was introduced in Israel, known as “Oz Le’Tmura”. The research sought to examine how the reform has influenced motivation to teach and teachers’ perceptions of the teaching profession. It was found out that the reform improves the quality of teaching, teachers’ professionalism, perception of the teaching profession and teachers’ status as they see it. This reform has redefined the factors that shape the perception of the teaching profession and motivation to teach on three levels and has improved the teachers’ work conditions and wages by introducing educational strategic processes in the education system.

 

 

 

New Article: Ben-David, Families at High Risk of Child Maltreatment

Ben-David, Vered. “Profiles of Families at High Risk of Child Maltreatment in Israeli Court Cases Dealing with the Termination of Parental Rights.” Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal 32.4 (2015): 359-73.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10560-015-0378-4

 

Abstract

The present study analyzes the characteristics of children and parents in court cases dealing with the termination of parental rights, in order to draw a profile of families at high risk of child maltreatment and shed light on the professional decision-making process. The analysis of a sample of 127 cases identified various child, parent and child–parent characteristics and inter-characteristics which served as a rich database for understanding the profiles of children at risk and their parents. On the basis of these profiles, the study was able to draw a prototype of a family at high risk of child maltreatment and identify the main factors considered by the courts when determining whether or not to terminate parental rights. This paper discusses the implications of these results on the need for early and extensive professional intervention in such families.

 
 
 
 

New Article: Shalhoub-Kevorkian, A Universalist Perspective for How Israel is using Child Arrest

Shalhoub-Kevorkian, Nadera. “Childhood: A Universalist Perspective for How Israel is using Child Arrest and Detention to further its Colonial Settler Project.” International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic Studies 12.3 (2015): 223-244.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/aps.1456

 

Abstract

Drawing from reports and documentation published by Israeli and Palestinian human rights and children’s rights organizations, and establishing the analyses from the voices and stories of Palestinian children suffering from politically motivated abuses, the present paper examines child abuse in settler colonial contexts. Through the analyses of the various voices, narratives, and reports, the paper examines the inscription of state power over children’s bodies and lives, marking the connection between biopolitics and geopolitics, as well as the resultant suffering of children. The analyses of the collected data suggest that knowledge about child maltreatment and the violations of children’s rights cannot be dislocated from the history, politics, and structure of settler colonialism. The paper concludes by arguing that living a childhood situated in spaces of exterminability, as the voices of the studied children reveal, should be defined as child abuse and maltreatment.

 

 

 

New Article: Baron-Epel & Ivancovsky, Unintentional Injuries in Minorities: A Case Study of Arab Israeli Children

Baron-Epel, Orna, and Michal Ivancovsky. “A Socio-Ecological Model for Unintentional Injuries in Minorities: A Case Study of Arab Israeli Children.” International Journal of Injury Control and Safety Promotion 22.1 (2015): 48-56.

 

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/17457300.2013.855794

 

Abstract

Minority children have often been reported to be at high risk of injury. The higher levels of reported unintentional injuries among Arab children compared to Jewish children in Israel are mainly due to pedestrian traffic crashes, falls and burns. Arab children aged 1–4 years have a higher relative risk of injury compared to Jews. We suggest a socio-ecological model to explain these differences in risk based on individual, interpersonal, community and societal ecological levels of society. Each level is divided into social and physical environments and behaviour. Two main factors may contribute to the high rates of injury among Arab children: the quality of the physical environment in which the children live and play and the levels of child supervision. Socio-economic status may contribute to these differences at all ecological levels of society. This approach could be useful for researchers and practitioners to analyse similar issues in other communities and help develop appropriate interventions.

New Article: Eisikovits et al, The Social Construction of Disclosure: The Case of Child Abuse in Israeli Society

Eisikovits, Zvi, Jonathan Davidov, Laura Sigad, and Rachel Lev-Wiesel. “The Social Construction of Disclosure: The Case of Child Abuse in Israeli Society.” In Mandatory Reporting Laws and the Identification of Severe Child Abuse and Neglect (ed. Ben Mathews and Donald C. Bross; Dordrecht and New York: Springer, 2015), 395-413.

 

URL: http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-94-017-9685-9_19

 

Abstract

Based on 40 in-depth qualitative interviews with professionals, including law-enforcement personnel, educators, and mental health and health-care professionals, this chapter presents a study that describes and analyzes an insider’s view of the ways in which child abuse professionals perceive and understand the disclosure of violence. We found that disclosure is a function of social processes related to the values, ideologies, ways of thinking, and interests of the various social agents involved in the process. Thus, disclosure is not an objective fact-finding process and the subsequent assignment of visibility and proper societal reaction, but rather a social construction.

CFP: Child and Family in challenging situations: legal issues (Ono Academic College, apply by April 30, 2015)

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Click here for a PDF file of this announcement.

Notice of Academic Symposium and Call for Papers

“Child and Family in challenging situations: legal issues”

June 9-10, 2015, Ono Academic College Faculty of Law, Kiryat Ono (Israel)

The International Academy for the Study of the Jurisprudence of the Family (“IASJF”) is pleased to announce that it will hold its 8th international symposium on the jurisprudence of the family on on Tuesday and Wednesday, June 9-10, 2015, at Ono Academic College Faculty of Law, Kiryat Ono, Israel. The topic of the symposium is “Child and Family in Challenging Situations: Legal Issues.” The Symposium will address the issues related to the topic from a juridical point of view; interdisciplinary presentations are also welcome.

Kiryat Ono, Israel, is in the Tel Aviv metropolitan area, and approximately 50 minutes’ drive from Jerusalem. The Ono Faculty of Law is Israel’s largest law school with 50 full-time faculty members including two full-time Family Law faculty: Dr. Yitshak Cohen and Dr. Yoav Mazeh, who are the hosts of this symposium. The symposium will be followed with an organized tour to the Old City of Jerusalem, which will take place on Thursday, June 11th.

The International Academy (IASJF), is an independent, interdisciplinary scholarly society that seeks to promote thoughtful consideration and discussion of the foundations of the family, including marriage, parenting, extended and other family relations. Our website is at: http://www.iasjf.org/. The IASFJ has previously hosted academic symposia at Boston College Law School in Boston, Massachusetts, USA; at Bratislava Law School of Pan-European University in Bratislava, Slovakia; at Pontifical Catholic University of Buenos Aires in Buenos Aires, Argentina; at the University of Malta in Valletta, Malta; in Doha, Qatar (hosted by the Doha International Institute for Family Studies and Development); at Cardozo Law School, New York City, USA; and at University of La Coruña, Spain. The IASFJ sponsors the International Journal of the Jurisprudence of the Family (“IJJF”), which is published in both print editions and in HeinOnline. Papers from prior symposia have been published in the IJJF; and selected submitted papers from the 2015 Symposium will be published in Volume 6 of the IJJF.

A person wishing to present a scholarly paper at the symposium should submit a short abstract of the paper they propose (no more than one page) including a working title, the identity, institutional affiliation and full contact information of the author(s), and a brief description of the paper proposed. Proposals should be sent to Professor Lynn D. Wardle (BYU, US) at wardlel@law.byu.edu, to Professor Carlos Martínez de Aguirre (University of Zaragoza, Spain) at aguirre@unizar.es, or to Dr. Yitshak Cohen (Ono Academic College, Israel) at Itshak_c@ono.ac.il , by April 30, 2015. Acceptances will be on a rolling basis. All symposium participants must register ($ 80 for Academy members, $ 120 for non-members, plus $ 40 late fee after 31 March 2015) and pay for their own transportation and hotel. The fee includes all symposium meals. Please, check for updated news about this symposium on http://www.iasjf.org/.

New Article: Veronese and Castiglioni, Palestinian Children Living amidst Military and Political Violence

Veronese, Guido and Marco Castiglioni. “‘When the doors of Hell close’: Dimensions of Well-Being and Positive Adjustment in a Group of Palestinian Children Living amidst Military and Political Violence.” Childhood 22.1 (2015): 6-22.

 

URL: http://chd.sagepub.com/content/22/1/6

 

Abstract

Palestinian children living amidst political and military violence are often labeled as affected by post-traumatic stress syndromes. Some researchers report that a majority of Palestinian children suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder and other stress-related psychiatric impairments in the wake of military incursions and bombings. On the other hand, data from field research and clinical experience show that these children continue to display positive functioning in terms of adjustment to trauma, despite the adverse environmental conditions. This article reports on qualitative research with children from two refugee camps in the West Bank, Occupied Palestinian Territories: Nur Shams and Tulkarm. Thematic content analysis was applied to narratives and written materials produced by 74 school-age children during two summer camps held in the Tulkarm region in 2010 and 2011. The aims of the study were: (a) to explore the domains of well-being that help children cope with violence and insecurity and (b) to investigate whether experiential activities focused on emotional and relational competences influenced children’s self-perceived well-being. Personal, environmental, micro- and macro-social factors were identified as playing a role in well-being. The article discusses the limitations of the study and its implications for clinical and community work with children exposed to political and military threat.

New Article: Hertzog, Minors’ Welfare and Bureaucratic Violence in Israel

Hertzog, Esther. “Minors’ Welfare and Bureaucratic Violence in Israel.” Anthropology of the Middle East 9.1 (2014): 42-58.

 

URL: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/berghahn/antmid/2014/00000009/00000001/art00004

 

Abstract

The article examines the welfare policy in Israel concerning ‘minors at risk’, mainly the cancellation of parents’ custody over their offspring and their placement in welfare institutions. I suggest that the ideological discourse plays a major role in this context and terms like ‘minor’s well-being’ are widely used for achieving public legitimacy of the social workers’ control of this field. Describing and analysing case studies which I attended and followed since the beginning of the 1990s reveal the consequences of taking away children from their families and placing them in state institutions. The analysis focuses on the organised bureaucratic violence towards children and their parents which accompanies the legally enforced procedures. It also discusses the forceful means used by the staff in the institutions towards the inmates, as part of maintaining order and discipline. I suggest that violent behaviour of officials and organisations which use the state’s organised power of coercion against minors and their parents is linked to personal, organisational and political motives.