New Article: Cochran, Israel in Lebanon (1982–1985)

Cochran, Shawn T. “Israel in Lebanon (1982–1985).” In his War Termination as a Civil-Military Bargain. Soldiers, Statesmen, and the Politics of Protracted Armed Conflict (Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016): 71-93.

 
war termination
 
URL: http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1057/9781137527974_4 
 

Abstract

The Lebanon War of 1982–85, generally recognized as the sixth Arab-Israeli conflict, was the longest and most divisive war in Israel’s history, producing “a level of polarization in Israeli society not seen since the birth of the state.” Israel did not anticipate a lengthy war at the outset nor did this appear likely in the early stages of the conflict. After only a week of fighting, Minister of Defense Ariel Sharon announced to the Knesset Defense Committee, “The job is done in Lebanon,” a claim with some parallels to President George W. Bush’s “mission accomplished” statement made in relation to Iraq two decades later. Contemporary observers were quick to claim Israeli victory and tout the operation as a military success. Israel Defense Forces (IDF) General Avraham Tamir would later recall, “Nobody in Israel could imagine at that moment that the IDF would withdraw only three years later after what was meant to be a swift operation.” Over the next few months, however, Israel became embroiled in a protracted struggle with guerilla forces and terrorists as it tried to translate early military gains into desired political objectives. Pundits labeled the war a “quagmire” and “morass.” One popular Israeli commentator likened the IDF in Lebanon to Napoleon’s army in Russia. Whatever the reference, apparent by the fall of 1982 was that “Israel was in for a long and dark nightmare from which there was no simple escape.”

 

 

 

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New Book: Golan | Lavi: The United States, Israel, and a Controversial Fighter Jet

Golan, John W. Lavi. The United States, Israel, and a Controversial Fighter Jet. Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press, 2016.

Lavi

The Lavi fighter program, the largest weapons-development effort ever undertaken by the State of Israel, envisioned a new generation of high-performance aircraft. In a controversial strategy, Israel Aircraft Industries intended to develop and manufacture the fighters in Israel with American financial support. The sophisticated planes, developed in the mid-1980s, were unique in design and intended to make up the majority of the Israeli air force. Though considerable prestige and money were at stake, developmental costs increased and doubts arose as to whether the Lavi could indeed be the warplane it was meant to be. Eventually the program became a microcosm for the ambitions, fears, and internal divisions that shaped both the U.S.-Israeli relationship and Israeli society itself. But the fighter never made it to operational service, and until now, the full breadth and significance of the Lavi story have never been examined and presented.

Lavi: The United States, Israel, and a Controversial Fighter Jet traces the evolution of the Lavi fighter from its genesis in the 1970s to its scrapping in August 1987. John W. Golan examines the roles of Israeli military icons and political leaders such as Ezer Weizman, Ariel Sharon, Menachem Begin, and Yitzhak Rabin in the program and in relation to their counterparts in the United States. On the American side, Golan traces the evolution of government policy toward the program, detailing the complex picture of the U.S. foreign policy apparatus and of U.S.-Israeli relations in general—from President Reagan’s public endorsement of the program on the White House lawn to Defense Secretary Caspar Weinberger’s unremitting attempts to cancel it in succeeding years.

 

JOHN W. GOLAN has served as a designer, structural analyst, and engineering manager in the U.S. aerospace industry for the last two decades, developing future-generation technology concepts. He has published articles with Air Forces Monthly, Combat Aircraft, Aviation History, and the Jerusalem Post Magazine.

 

New Article: Freilich; National Security Decision-Making in a Leaky Political Fishbowl

Freilich, Charles (Chuck) D. “Israel: National Security Decision-Making in a Leaky Political Fishbowl.” Comparative Strategy 34.2 (2015): 117-32.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01495933.2015.1017341

 

Abstract

The article is a first attempt to systematically assess the impact of leaks on Israeli decision-making. Five major cases were studied on three levels: whether leaks affected the process, policies adopted, and outcomes. Leaks had a strong impact in two cases, but not on the policies adopted, or outcomes, in any of the cases analyzed. As a tentative conclusion, most leaks are about Israel’s broad strategic thinking and the politics thereof, rather than hard information. The primary impact is on process, important in itself, not substance.

 

ToC: Israel Studies 20.2 (2015); Special Section: Bodies In Question

Israel Studies 20.2 (2015) Table of Contents:

 

Special Section: Bodies In Question

Wars of the Wombs: Struggles Over Abortion Policies in Israel (pp. 1-26)

Rebecca Steinfeld

Halutzah or Beauty Queen? National Images of Women in Early Israeli Society (pp. 27-52)

Julie Grimmeisen

‘Re-orient-ation’: Sport and the Transformation of the Jewish Body and Identity (pp. 53-75)

Yotam Hotam

‘Uniting the Nation’s Various Limbs into a National Body’ the Jerusalem People’s House (pp. 76-109)

Esther Grabiner

 

Articles

The Test of Maritime Sovereignty: The Establishment of the Zim National Shipping Company and the Purchase of the Kedmah, 1945–1952 (pp. 110-134)

Kobi Cohen-Hattab

Budgeting for Ultra-Orthodox Education—The Failure of Ultra-Orthodox Politics, 1996–2006 (pp. 135-162)

Hadar Lipshits

The Mizrahi Sociolect in Israel: Origins and Development (pp. 163-182)

Yehudit Henshke

Review Essay: The Theoretical Normalization of Israel in International Relations(pp. 183-189)

[Reviews  of: The Political Psychology of Israeli Prime Ministers: When Hard-Liners Opt for Peace, by Yael S. Aronoff; Why Hawks Become Doves: Shimon Peres and Foreign Policy Change in Israel by Guy Ziv]

Brent E. Sasley

 

Notes on Contributors (pp. 190-191)

Guidelines for Contributors (pp. 192-194)

New Book: Wilhelm and Gust, eds. New Towns for a New State (German)

Wilhelm, Karin and Kerstin Gust, eds. Neue Städte für einen neuen Staat. Die städtebauliche Erfindung des modernen Israel und der Wiederaufbau in der BRD. Eine Annäherung. Bielefeld: transcript, 2013.

URL: http://www.transcript-verlag.de/978-3-8376-2204-1/neue-staedte-fuer-einen-neuen-staat

9783837622041_720x720

Abstract

Israel and Palestine – What is today presented as a seemingly hopeless political situation, began with optimism, albeit a naive dream, towards building a peaceful society for all religions with the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948. For this purpose, the economist Edgar Salin (1892-1974) founded in 1958 “The Israel Economic and Sociological Research Project (IESRP),” which was to play a central role in the establishment of the “new towns” in Israel. The contributions here examine for the first time in a systematic way this project and its cultural and political importance, as well as relevant topics including planning debates and construction issues in the Federal Republic of Germany.

With contributions by Eliezer Ben-Rafael, Meron Benvenisti, Jörn Düwel, Zvi Efrat, Anton Föllmi, Rachel callus, Ruth Kark, Anna Minta, Andreas Nachama, Willi Oberkrome, Martin Peschken, Bertram Schefold, Axel Schildt, Julius H. Schoeps, Korinna Schönhärl, Yaakov Sharett, Thomas Sieverts, Joachim Trezib, Stefan Vogt, Georg Wagner Kyora, Karin Wilhelm, Joachim Wolschke-Bulmahn and Moshe Zuckermann.

Click here for a Table of Contents (in German)

New Article: Mnookin, Eiran, and Gilad, Negotiation Lessons from Israel’s ‘Unilateral’ Gaza Withdrawal

Mnookin, Robert H., Ehud Eiran, and Shula Gilad. “Is Unilateralism Always Bad? Negotiation Lessons from Israel’s ‘Unilateral’ Gaza Withdrawal.” Negotiation Journal 30.2 (2014): 131-156.‏

URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/nejo.12051/abstract

 

Abstract

Using the 2005 unilateral Israeli withdrawal from Gaza as a case study, this article exposes an apparent paradox: circumstances may exist in which an outcome that serves the interests of parties to a conflict cannot be achieved through bilateral negotiation but can be achieved by unilateral action. Although the withdrawal was seen at the time as serving the interests of both the Israeli government and the Palestinians, we argue that the same result could not have been achieved through bilateral negotiations. “Behind-the-table” internal conflicts on each side would have made it impossible for the leaders to agree on the scope of these negotiations.

Prime Minister Ariel Sharon’s success in implementing his Gaza withdrawal was attributable in significant measure to his ability to maintain ambiguity about his long-run plans for the West Bank. Only by focusing attention on Gaza was he able to build the necessary coalition to implement the controversial move. The Palestinian leaders, on the other hand, could never have agreed to come to the table to negotiate about Gaza alone — they would have insisted that the scope of any negotiations address a broad range of final status issues.

In this article, we identify some of the lessons that the Gaza example teaches regarding the utility and limits of unilateralism as well as the benefits and potential costs of employing ambiguity as a strategy to help accomplish a controversial move. Finally, we also explore the aftermath of the withdrawal and its many missed opportunities for improving the outcome. We suggest that, even when acting unilaterally, leaders should carefully consider the probable impact of their actions on the internal conflicts of their adversaries.

See also responses by Gilead Sher (pp. 157-163); and James K. Sebenius (pp. 165-168)

ToC: Israel Affairs 20,1 (2014)

Israel Affairs, Vol. 20, No. 1, 02 Jan 2014 is now available on Taylor & Francis Online.

This new issue contains the following articles:

Articles
Alternative energy in Israel: opportunities and risks
Gawdat Bahgat
Pages: 1-18
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.863078

The success of the Zionist strategy vis-à-vis UNSCOP
Elad Ben-Dror
Pages: 19-39
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.863079

Israel: ‘occupier’ or ‘occupied’? The psycho-political projection of Christian and post-Christian supersessionism
Kalman J. Kaplan & Paul Cantz
Pages: 40-61
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.863082

Misuse of power in Israeli intelligence
Ephraim Kahana & Daphna Sharfman
Pages: 62-74
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.863081

The birth of the core issues: the West Bank and East Jerusalem under Israeli administration, 1967–76 (Part 2)
Moshe Elad
Pages: 75-86
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.863080

One step forward or two steps back? Unilateralism and Israel’s Gaza disengagement in the eyes of the world
Geoffrey Levin
Pages: 87-103
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.863084

Between private property rights and national preferences: the Bank of Israel’s early years
Arie Krampf
Pages: 104-124
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.863083

Bandwagoning for profit and Turkey: alliance formations and volatility in the Middle East
Spyridon N. Litsas
Pages: 125-139
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2013.863085

Reviews: Shlaim, Israel and Palestine

Avi Shlaim. Israel and Palestine: Reappraisals, Revisions, Refutations. London / Brooklyn, NY: Verso, 2009.

9781844676569-frontcover

Reviews

  • Robert Fisk, “Lessons in Justice and Fairness from a No-Nonsense Historian.” The Independent, July 25, 2009.
  • Stephen Sizer, “Review.” Stephen Sizer (blog), July 2009.
  • Michael Rubner, Middle East Policy 17,1 (2010): 157-160.
  • Rafael Behr, “Review.” The Guardian, October 2, 2010.
  • Hisham Khatib. “Review.” British Journal of Middle Eastern Studies 38.2 (2011): 283-4.
  • James L. Gelvin. “Review.” International Journal of Middle East Studies 45.1 (2013): 191-193.

ToC: Israel Studies 15,3 (2010)

Israel Studies 15,3 (2010)

Table of Contents

Special Issue: The Making of Israeli Foreign Policy

Guest Editors: Gabriel Sheffer and Natan Aridan

View Cover Art

Introduction

Natan Aridan
Gabriel Sheffer

pp. v-xi

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Articles

Moshe Sharett and the Origins of Israel’s Diplomacy

Moshe Yegar

pp. 1-26

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Subject Headings:

Moshe Sharett, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Jewish Diaspora

Gabriel Sheffer

pp. 27-46

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Subject Headings:

Jewish Issues in Israeli Foreign Policy: Israeli-Austrian Relations in the 1950s

Ronald W. Zweig

pp. 47-60

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Subject Headings:

A Small Nation Goes to War: Israel’s Cabinet Authorization of the 1956 War

Pnina Lahav

pp. 61-86

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Subject Headings:

On Two Parallel Tracks—The Secret Jordanian-Israeli Talks (July 1967–September 1973)

Moshe Shemesh

pp. 87-120

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Subject Headings:

Africa in Israeli Foreign Policy—Expectations and Disenchantment: Historical and Diplomatic Aspects

Arye Oded

pp. 121-142

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Subject Headings:

Incoherent Narrator: Israeli Public Diplomacy During the Disengagement and the Elections in the Palestinian Authority

Shaul R. Shenhav
Tamir Sheafer
Itay Gabay

pp. 143-162

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Ambiguity and Conflict in Israeli-Lebanese Relations

Oren Barak

pp. 163-188

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Document

Israel’s Refusal to Endorse the American Friends of Israel (1956)

Natan Aridan

pp. 189-201

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Contributors

Contributors

pp. 202-204

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Cite: Aronoff, The Legacy of Ariel Sharon

Aronoff, Yael S. "From Warfare to Withdrawal: The Legacy of Ariel Sharon." Israel Studies 15,2 (2010): 149-172.

 

URL: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/israel_studies/summary/v015/15.2.aronoff.html

 

Abstract

What explains Sharon’s policy of unilaterally disengaging from settlements he himself promoted and defended as necessary for Israel’s security? His shift in policy can be explained by ideological and personality factors that enabled the change, in combination with more proximate, sufficient causes. Sharon’s weak commitment to any one ideology, his present time orientation, his high risk propensity, and moderate cognitive flexibility enabled his significant policy changes. Sharon’s straddling between Labor and Likud perspectives both acts as a permissive variable for some change, and also as a restraint on more extensive change, such as giving up the entire West Bank and dividing Jerusalem.

ToC: Israel Studies 15,2 (2010)

 Israel Studies Volume 15, Number 2, Summer 2010

Journal Information

Israel Studies

Table of Contents

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Zionist Dialectics

Post-Post-Zionist Historiography

Assaf Likhovski

pp. 1-23

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Subject Headings:

Palestine Under the Mandate

Teaching the Children to Play: The Establishment of the First Playgrounds in Palestine During the Mandate

Zipora Shehory-Rubin
Shifra Shvarts

pp. 24-48

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Bedouin, Abdül Hamid II, British Land Settlement, and Zionism: The Baysan Valley and Sub-district 1831-1948

Ruth Kark
Seth J. Frantzman

pp. 49-79

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Subject Headings:

Reception of the Developmental Approach in the Jewish Economic Discourse of Mandatory Palestine, 1934-1938

Arie Krampf

pp. 80-103

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Subject Headings:

Articles

Diverging Goals: The French and Israeli Pursuit of the Bomb, 1958-1962

Gadi Heiman

pp. 104-126

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Subject Headings:

Pacifism and Anti-Militarism in the Period Surrounding the Birth of the State of Israel

Tamar Hermann

pp. 127-148

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Subject Headings:

From Warfare to Withdrawal: The Legacy of Ariel Sharon

Yael S. Aronoff

pp. 149-172

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Subject Headings:

Mass Mobilization to Direct Engagement: American Jews’ Changing Relationship to Israel

Theodore Sasson

pp. 173-195

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Subject Headings:

Constructing Literate Israelis: A Critical Analysis of Adult Literacy Texts

Esther Schely-Newman

pp. 196-214

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