Jobs: Professor of Israel Studies at Northeastern University

Northeastern University invites nominations and applications for a specialist in Israel Studies to be appointed at the rank of professor, associate professor, or assistant professor beginning Fall 2013. The successful candidate will be an outstanding researcher and teacher whose work makes a central disciplinary contribution in the social sciences or history, as well as to Israel and Middle East Studies. The field of specialization is open, and the College of Social Sciences and Humanities is particularly interested in enhancing strengths in international relations, political economy, or international security. The appointment will be in one or more of the College for Social Sciences and Humanities’ departments or schools and may reach into its International Affairs Program.

Qualifications: A doctoral degree by the start date is required.

Additional Information: Applicants should submit a letter of interest, including a statement on teaching, a CV, a statement of current and future research plans, a writing sample of no more than fifty pages, and contact information for three referees or a dossier service. To apply visit the College of Social Sciences and Humanities website at: http://www.northeastern.edu/cssh/ and click on the Faculty Positions button. Please address inquiries about the position to Mitchell Orenstein, Chair of the Israel Studies Search Committee, m.orenstein@neu.edu.

Review of applications will begin February 22, 2013, but the search will remain open until the position is filled.

https://www.h-net.org/jobs/job_display.php?id=46285

Jobs: Assistant Lecturer, Modern Israel. Australian Centre for Jewish Civilisation, Monash

From: http://jobs.theconversation.edu.au/jobs/3377-assistant-lecturer-australian-centre-for-jewish-civilisation

 

Assistant Lecturer (Australian Centre for Jewish Civilisation)

Job No.

507368

Faculty / Portfolio:

Faculty of Arts

School Philosophical, Historical and International Studies Australian Centre for Jewish Civilisation

Location: Caulfield campus

Employment Type: Full-time

Duration: Two year fixed-term appointment (commencing July 2013)

Remuneration: $62,724 – $85,128 pa Level A (includes 9% employer superannuation)

The Australian Centre for Jewish Civilisation is seeking an Assistant Lecturer with a dynamic teaching and research profile in the area of Middle East studies with a specialisation in the history of modern Israel. You will teach in areas of high student interest offered by the Australian Centre for Jewish Civilisation, support research student supervision and engage in original and innovative research.

You will bolster the centre’s strengths in the areas of modern Israel and Middle East Studies, playing a leading role in teaching the following existing History units:

Modern Israel: History, Politics and Society The Middle East in the Modern World The History of the Arab-Israeli Conflict War and Peace: Models of Conflict Resolution.

You will have:

a PhD qualification or near completion in the discipline of History relating to modern Israel and/or the Middle East expertise in the history of the Middle East with a specialisation in Israel a working knowledge of Hebrew evidence of outstanding reserch potential proven excellence in teaching the ability to work as part of a team high level verbal and written communication skills good organisational and administrative skills willingness to participate in the Centre’s public engagement programs.

This role is a full-time position; however, flexible working arrangements may be negotiated.

Your application must address the selection criteria. Please refer to "How to apply for Monash Jobs"

Enquiries

Mr Mark Baker, Director, Jewish Studies, +61 3 9903 5001 Position Description PD – Assistant Lecturer – Australian Centre for Jewish Civilisation Closing Date Monday 21 January 2013, 11:55pm Aus. Eastern Daylight Time

Cite: Toren, Oriental Faculty Women in Israel

Toren, Nina. “Intersection of Ethnicity, Gender and Class: Oriental Faculty Women in Israel.” Gender Issues 26.2 (2009): 152-166.

 

URL: http://www.springerlink.com/content/5991810431274210/

Abstract

Ethnicity, gender and class are the major factors of social inequality and have been studied extensively leading to a large literature pertaining to each one of them. The issue of the intersection of ethnicity, gender and class has been introduced into the social sciences by feminist critical theory. Intersection theory postulates that minority groups are discriminated against on the basis of more than one characteristic which are “inextricably tied” leading to complex forms of inequality in various social domains. This study examines the intertwined effects of these factors as they are experienced and narrated by Mizrachi women (19) who are employed in universities and colleges. Although the intersection approach is generally supported by the data it was found that under certain conditions ethnicity, gender and class may be separated. One type of decomposition is when one identity encroaches upon another or others; the second is the separation of diverse identities assigning them to different life areas. These change processes do not support stereotypical dichotomies between Ashkenazi and Mizrachi, women and men and so on, and enable the creation of new hybrid identities.

Reviews: Ghazi-Bouillon, Understanding the ME Peace Process

Ghazi-Bouillon, Asima A. Understanding the Middle East Peace Process. Israeli Academia and the Struggle for Identity. Routledge Studies on the Arab-Israeli Conflict. London: Routledge, 2009.

Reviews:

  • Hallward, Maia Carter. “Review.” International Journal of Middle East Studies 43.3 (2011): 565-567.

New publication: Kotzin, Judah L. Magnes

Kotzin, Daniel P. Judah L. Magnes. An American Jewish Nonconformist. Syracuse, N.Y.: Syracuse University Press, 2010.

judah-190

URL: http://www.syracuseuniversitypress.syr.edu/spring-2010/judah-magnes.html

Description

Judah L. Magnes (1877–1948) was an American Reform rabbi, Jewish community leader, and active pacifist during World War I. In the 1920s he moved to British Mandatory Palestine, where he helped found and served as first chancellor of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Later, in the 1930s and 1940s, he emerged as the leading advocate for the binational plan for Palestine. In these varied roles, he actively participated in the major transformations in American Jewish life and the Zionist movement during the first half of the twentieth century.

Kotzin tells the story of how Magnes, immersed in American Jewish life, Zionism, and Jewish life in Mandatory Palestine, rebelled against the dominant strains of all three. His tireless efforts ensured that Jewish public life was vibrant and diverse, and not controlled by any one faction within Jewry. Magnes brought American ideals to Palestine, and his unique conception of Zionism shaped Jewish public life in Palestine, influencing both the development of the Hebrew University and Zionist policy toward Arabs.