Policy paper: O’Donnell, The European Union as a Mediator in Israel-Palestine

O’Donnell, Hugh. “The European Union as a Mediator in Israel-Palestine: Operations Cast Lead and Protective Edge.” EU Diplomacy Paper 01/2016.

 

URL: https://www.coleurope.eu/system/files_force/research-paper/edp_1_2016_odonnell.pdf (PDF)

 

Abstract
The European Union (EU) has played an important, yet inconsistent role in the Israel-Palestine conflict since the1980 Venice Declaration. This paper analyses how the EU’s role as a mediator has changed more recently in the Israel-Gaza conflict. Specifically, it examines how the ‘Concept on Strengthening EU Mediation and Dialogue Capacities’ adopted in 2009 and the creation of the European External Action Service and the High Representative by the Lisbon Treaty have changed the EU’s resources and strategies as a mediator as well as how these developments improved cooperation and coordination with other mediators. This analysis is done through a comparison of the EU’s role in the Israeli Operation Cast Lead in 2008/2009 and Operation Protective Edge in 2014. It is argued that the aforementioned changes made the EU a more capable mediator and facilitated internal coordination. However, these changes did not create more resources for the EU as a mediator, rather they changed how the EU used its resources.

 

 

 

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Thesis: Hemelberg, CNN and Al-Jazeera Coverage of the Israeli-Arabic Conflict

Hemelberg, Stephany. Between the Headlines of the Israeli-Arabic Conflict: The Coverage of CNN and Al Jazeera, BA Thesis. Bogotá: Del Rosario University, 2015.

 

URL: http://repository.urosario.edu.co/handle/10336/11629

 

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to analyze the coverage made by CNN and Al Jazeera (in Arabic) to operation Caste Lead and the Goldstone Report during 2008 and 2009. This investigation is based in the theory of Qualitative Analysis of Content, by Wildemuth and Zhang. The methodology follows up with the one proposed by the authors in the main theory, complementing it with the Gamson and Modigliani´s Framing theory. The methodology mention above display the different in the coverage development, determined by the geopolitical influences; being CNN more influenced by a Western pro-USA and pro Israeli speech, while Al Jazeera is more prone to support the Palestinian cause, this is the thesis of this article. During the development of the investigation, the thesis was demonstrated to be only partially accurate as CNN was not completely supportive to the Israeli arguments during the coverage, but Al Jazeera did have preferential speech for the Palestinian cause.

 

 

 

Thesis: Sahhar, On Western Media Collusion with Israel’s ‘Wars’ and Recovering the Palestinian Story

Sahhar, Micaela. Occupied Narrative: On Western Media Collusion with Israel’s ‘Wars’ and Recovering the Palestinian Story, PhD thesis. Melbourne: School of Social and Political Sciences, University of Melbourne, 2015.

 

URL:https://minerva-access.unimelb.edu.au/handle/11343/58374

 

Abstract

This thesis seeks to capture the effects of decline in normative narrative structure about the Israel–Palestinian conflict. By engaging in analysis of Western media, the work illuminates the reliance of Western media coverage on Israeli narrative, and the way in which the media has conditioned Western publics to view the conflict. It argues that, historically, privileging a perception in which Palestinians are primarily defined through an Israeli optic has been key to the dissolution of Palestinian narrative internationally and has diminished the weight of contemporary Palestinian claims in diplomatic process. However, it is argued that the first decade of the 21st century saw a growing critique on how Israel-Palestinian relations are defined.

Accordingly, the project takes as its source material the reports and editorials of three different newspapers during two Israeli assaults on the Occupied Palestinian Territories: Operation Defensive Shield (2002) and Operation Cast Lead (2008–9), to document both the way in which certain kinds of narratives are privileged in portraying the Israel–Palestinian conflict, and the decline in narrative dominance which Israeli narrative had previously enjoyed. Both events occurred at the start of a radically different media age for capturing and disseminating information, which created an environment in which depiction of the operations in Western media could not be received as absolute, but circulated alongside other, contestable, narratives. This expanded traffic of information, and Israeli and Western media’s command over and response to this, evince a growing friction between Israeli-driven perspective and emerging alternatives in mainstream discourse. Thus, this thesis seeks to interrogate the inadequacies of received knowledge about the Israel–Palestinian conflict in the West at a moment in which the edifice of dominant narrative has become untenable, and simultaneously a moment in which new narratives might be advanced with hope of a willing reception.

The thesis concludes by evaluating the impact of, and response to, these operations on narrative about the conflict, and considers how this change in narrative direction since Operation Cast Lead could contribute to transforming the dynamic of Israel–Palestinian relations. It argues that shifts in media representation are indicative of the external pressures which have forced Israel to engage in a battle for legitimacy. It considers how certain discourses, such as securitisation and terror, which have privileged Israeli objectives through a matrix of deflection, could be (re)incorporated into an analytical rather than political framework to transform the current discourse on Israel–Palestinian relations, in particular by enabling the international community to scrutinise Israeli action and hold Israel to account. Finally it considers what effect these signs of narrative transformation could have on Israel’s relations with the Palestinians. However, it is concluded that work towards reconciliation will ultimately require radical shifts in the Israeli subjectivity in order to create a willing partner in Israel for meaningful change.

 

 

 

New Article: Bodas et al, Perception of the Threat of War in Israel

Bodas, Moran, Maya Siman-Tov, Shulamith Kreitler, and Kobi Peleg. “Perception of the Threat of War in Israel – Implications for Future Preparedness Planning.” Israel Journal of Health Policy Research (early view; online first).

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/110.1186/s13584-015-0026-7

 

Abstract

Background
It has been recently reported that the preparedness of the Israeli public to a war scenario is mediocre. These findings suggest a need to study the psychosocial mechanisms behind individual motivation to engage in preparedness behavior. One component of these mechanisms is the perception of threat. The purpose of this study is to portray the perception of the threat of war by the Israeli public and to deduce possible implications for resilience-promoting policies.

Methods
Portions of the data accumulated in a telephone-based random sampling of 503 households (representing the Israeli population) performed in October 2013 were utilized to examine the perception of the threat of war by Israelis. The questionnaire was used to examine the level of household preparedness, as well as attitudes toward perception of threat, preparedness responsibility, willingness to search for information, and sense of preparedness. Statistical analysis was performed to determine the correlations between different components of threat perception, and to evaluate the preparedness promoting features of specific perception factors.

Results
The data suggest that the perception of threat is influenced by different socio-demographic factors. In particular, age, religion and education seem to play an important role in the perception of threat. Compared to data collected almost a decade ago, the likelihood perception and threat intrusiveness rates were significantly reduced. The regression analysis suggests that perception of the severity of the impact on a family’s routine and willingness to search for information, two known preparedness promoting factors, can be predicted by various socio-demographic and threat perception components.

Conclusion
The data suggest that the Israeli public, post the Second Lebanon War (2006) and the Gaza conflicts of 2009 and 2012, perceives the probabilities of war and being affected by it as diminished. The Israeli public demonstrates what can be considered as the unique characteristics of a war-victimized population. Implications for a future resilience-promoting policy were discussed.

 

 

New Book: Kuntsman and Stein, Digital Militarism

Kuntsman, Adi, and Rebecca L. Stein. Digital Militarism. Israel’s Occupation in the Social Media Age, Stanford Studies in Middle Eastern and Islamic Societies and Cultures. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2015.

 

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Israel’s occupation has been transformed in the social media age. Over the last decade, military rule in the Palestinian territories grew more bloody and entrenched. In the same period, Israelis became some of the world’s most active social media users. In Israel today, violent politics are interwoven with global networking practices, protocols, and aesthetics. Israeli soldiers carry smartphones into the field of military operations, sharing mobile uploads in real-time. Official Israeli military spokesmen announce wars on Twitter. And civilians encounter state violence first on their newsfeeds and mobile screens.

Across the globe, the ordinary tools of social networking have become indispensable instruments of warfare and violent conflict. This book traces the rise of Israeli digital militarism in this global context—both the reach of social media into Israeli military theaters and the occupation’s impact on everyday Israeli social media culture. Today, social media functions as a crucial theater in which the Israeli military occupation is supported and sustained.

 

Table of Contents

Preface

1 When Instagram Went to War: Israel’s Occupation in the Social Media Age
2 “Another War Zone”: The Development of Digital Militarism
3 Anatomy of a Facebook Scandal: Social Media as Alibi
4 Palestinians Who Never Die: The Politics of Digital Suspicion
5 Selfie Militarism: The Normalization of Digital Militarism

Afterword: #Revenge

Acknowledgements
Notes
Bibliography
Index

Adi Kuntsman is Lecturer in Information and Communications at Manchester Metropolitan University, and author of Figurations of Violence and Belonging: Queerness, Migranthood and Nationalism in Cyberspace and Beyond (2009).

Rebecca L. Stein is the Nicholas J. & Theresa M. Leonardy Associate Professor of Anthropology at Duke University, and author of Itineraries in Conflict: Israelis, Palestinians, and the Political Lives of Tourism (2008).

 

 

ToC: Theory and Event 18.1 (2015); special issue: The Israeli War on Gaza 2014

Theory and Event, 18.1, supplement, January 2015

Introduction: The Israeli War on Gaza 2014
Jon Simons

The Underground Ghetto City of Gaza
Amir Nizar Zuabi

Deconstructing the Israeli Socio-political Apartheid System
Adel Manna

Gaza 2014: The Collapse of a Control Model
Lev Grinberg

Five Lessons Learned from the Israeli Attack on Gaza
Muhammad Ali Khalidi

“Meeting with a Dietician”: Israel’s Institutionalised Impoverishment of Gaza
Trude Strand

Inhabiting the Split: Dissident Aspirations in Times of War
Louise Bethlehem

Divine Violence, Divine Peace: Gaza 2014
Jon Simons

The War with Gaza Did Not Take Place
Ofer Cassif

Biographies

 

New Article: Honig and Reichard, Autocratic Rulers’ Strategic Choices Following Military Defeats

Honig, Or, and Ariel Reichard. “Realism or Radicalism: Explaining Autocratic Rulers’ Strategic Choices Following Military Defeats in the Middle East.” Journal of the Middle East and Africa 6.2 (2015): 125-46.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/21520844.2015.1055453

 

Abstract

This article explains autocratic rulers’ behavior in the aftermath of costly military defeats in the Middle East. Essentially, military defeats cause political crises of legitimacy for all Middle East rulers, albeit to varying degrees of severity. In responding to these crises, rulers have two broad strategic options: addressing the crisis’ root cause by reversing the strategic consequences of defeat or merely mitigating the immediate political symptoms of the crisis. Crucially, it is the severity of the political crisis that is the primary factor determining the choice of strategy. However, when the crisis is less severe, additional factors—leaders’ own beliefs, perceptions about the viability of each option, and their regime’s particular vulnerabilities—also determine the choice between the two orientations.

New Article: Louise Bethlehem, Scratching the Surface

Bethlehem, Louise. “Scratching the Surface: The Home and the Haptic in Lauren Beukes’s Zoo city and Elsewhere.” Scrutiny2 20.1 (2015): 3-23.

 

URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/18125441.2015.1035745

 

Abstract

This paper deploys the haptic, and more broadly speaking, notions of multisensory reading and spectatorship to reconfigure perceptions of home. It explores configurations of home in the practice of the late French-Israeli visual artist, Absalon, to draw tropes of “complicity” and “contagion” into an intersection with discourses of moral hygiene arising from the modernist preoccupation with denuded surface in the history of architecture. It then goes on to read a postapartheid South African text, Lauren Beukes’s Zoo city (2010), through the lens of these concerns. Beukes’s text, it claims, can be made to precipitate the historicity of the white suburban home under apartheid. The novel offers alternative iterations of domesticity, however, as metonymies of contagion shift into metonymies of conviviality. The final section of the paper investigates the vulnerability of the home against the background of the 2014 Israeli war on Gaza and its assault on the built environment. It explores an art exhibition, Postcards for Gaza, staged by the dissident Israeli organization, Zochrot, in the context of a previous military assault on Gaza in 2008. Here the reworking of photographic surface is made to gesture towards the possibility of political reparation in an alternate modality of complicity that Mark Sanders parses as “human-foldedness” (Sanders 2002).

 

 

New Article: Bouris, The Vicious Cycle of Building and Destroying: the 2014 War on Gaza

Bouris, Dimitris. “The Vicious Cycle of Building and Destroying: the 2014 War on Gaza.” Mediterranean Politics (early view; online first).

 

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13629395.2015.1007000

 

Abstract

The 2014 summer war on Gaza was the third in the last six years and in many ways the most devastating one. While the triggers to this war were the kidnapping and killing of the three Israeli teenagers angazd the subsequent kidnapping and burning alive of a Palestinian teenager, the real reasons can be traced back to the international community’s failed and myopic policies towards Gaza. Moreover, by adopting the ‘West Bank first’ strategy the international community has failed to blow some fresh air into what is left of the so-called Middle East Peace Process and has acted as the abettor of the recent war.

 
 
 
 
 

Reviews: Craig, International Legitimacy and the Politics of Security

Craig, Alan. International Legitimacy and the Politics of Security. The Strategic Deployment of Lawyers in the Israeli Military. Lanham, MD: Lexington, 2013.

 

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Reviews:

Bendor, Ariel. “Review.” Israel Studies Review 29.2 (2014): 155-157.

Belge, Ceren. “Review.” International Journal of Middle East Studies 47.1 (2015): 179-180.

ToC: Israel Affairs 21.1 (2015)

Israel Affairs, Volume 21, Issue 1, January 2015

 

This new issue contains the following articles:

Articles
Ethnic Income Disparities in Israel
Pnina O. Plaut & Steven E. Plaut
Pages: 1-26
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.984418

‘Mayhew’s outcasts’: anti-Zionism and the Arab lobby in Harold Wilson’s Labour Party
James R. Vaughan
Pages: 27-47
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.984420

Israel Negev Bedouin during the 1948 War: Departure and Return
Havatzelet Yahel & Ruth Kark
Pages: 48-97
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.984421

Good news: the Carmel Newsreels and their place in the emerging Israeli language media
Oren Soffer & Tamar Liebes
Pages: 98-111
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.984422

From ‘Rambo’ to ‘sitting ducks’ and back again: the Israeli soldier in the media
Elisheva Rosman & Zipi Israeli
Pages: 112-130
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.984423

Israel and the Arab Gulf states: from tacit cooperation to reconciliation?
Yoel Guzansky
Pages: 131-147
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.984424

Building partnerships between Israeli and Palestinian youth: an integrative approach
Debbie Nathan, David Trimble & Shai Fuxman
Pages: 148-164
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.984436

Book Reviews
Flexigidity: the secret of Jewish adaptability
David Rodman
Pages: 165-166
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.937913

Russia and Israel in the changing Middle East
David Rodman
Pages: 166-167
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.937914

Social mobilization in the Arab–Israeli war of 1948: on the Israeli home front
David Rodman
Pages: 167-169
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.937915

These are my brothers: a dramatic story of heroism during the Yom Kippur War
David Rodman
Pages: 169-171
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.937916

Jews and the military: a history
David Rodman
Pages: 171-173
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.937917

The Jewish revolt: ad 66–74
David Rodman
Pages: 173-173
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.937918

The city besieged: siege and its manifestations in the ancient Near East
David Rodman
Pages: 173-175
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.937919

The forgotten kingdom: the archaeology and history of northern Israel
David Rodman
Pages: 175-176
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2014.937920

New Book: Peterson, Palestine-Israel in the Print News Media

Peterson, Luke. Palestine-Israel in the Print News Media. Contending Discourses. Abingdon: Routledge, 2014.

9781138781641

URL: http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9781138781641/

Abstract

Israel-Palestine in the Print News Media: Contending Discourses is concerned with conceptions of language, knowledge, and thought about political conflict in the Middle East in two national news media communities: the United States and the United Kingdom.

Arguing for the existence of national perspectives which are constructed, distributed, and reinforced in the print news media, this study provides a detailed linguistic analysis of print news media coverage of four recent events in the Palestinian-Israeli conflict in order to examine ideological patterns present in print news media coverage. The two news communities are compared for lexical choices in news stories about the conflict, attribution of agency in the discussion of conflict events, the inclusion or exclusion of historical context in explanations of the conflict, and reliance upon essentialist elements during and within print representations of Palestine-Israel. The book also devotes space to first-hand testimony from journalists with extensive experience covering the conflict from within both news media institutions.

Unifying various avenues of academic enquiry reflecting upon the acquisition of information and the development of knowledge, this book will be of interest to those seeking a new approach to the Palestinian-Israeli conflict.

Table of Contents

Introduction: Language and the Printed News

2 Discourse and Theory

3 Nations, Publics, and the Print News Media

4 Covering Palestine-Israel

5 Evacuating Gaza from Two Sides of the Atlantic

6 The Palestinian Legislative Council Elections, 2006

7 Covering the Gaza War

8 The Flotilla Attack

9 The Journalistic Perspective: Covering Palestine-Israel in their own Words

10 Conclusion: Contending Discourses

 

 

ToC: Journal of Palestine Studies 44.1 (2014)

Table of Contents Alert
University of California Press is happy to notify you that the new issue of Journal of Palestine Studies is now available. The online issues of this journal are hosted on JSTOR on behalf of University of California Press.
Journal Cover Journal of Palestine Studies
Vol. 44, No. 1, Autumn 2014
SPECIAL ISSUE: OPERATION PROTECTIVE EDGE

Cover
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1
Front Matter
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1
Table of Contents
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1

FROM THE EDITOR

The Dahiya Doctrine, Proportionality, and War Crimes
Rashid I. Khalidi
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 5-13.

ANALYSIS OF THE WAR

Politicide in Gaza: How Israel’s Far Right Won the War
Max Blumenthal
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 14-28.
Another Freedom Summer
Robin D.G. Kelley
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 29-41.
The Psychosis of Permanent War
Chris Hedges
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 42-51.
The Twelve Wars on Gaza
Jean-Pierre Filiu
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 52-60.
The Implications of Joining the ICC after Operation Protective Edge
Victor Kattan
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 61-73.
Photos
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 74-75.

AN OFFICIAL PERSPECTIVE

Interview with Hanan Ashrawi: Oslo, the PA, and Reinventing the PLO
Rashid Khalidi
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 76-87.
Photos
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 88-90.

DISSECTING THE DISCOURSE

Blaming the Victims
Diana Buttu
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 91-96.
Crisis Moments: Shifting the Discourse
Yousef Munayyer
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 97-105.
Interview with Noura Erakat: Framing the Palestinian Narrative
Nehad Khader
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 106-117.
Photos
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 118-119.

PERSONAL REFLECTIONS

After the Smoke Clears: Gaza’s Everyday Resistance
Laila El-Haddad
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 120-125.
Interview with Dr. Basil Baker: Quick Death under Fire, Slow Death under Siege
Nehad Khader
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 126-132.
A Response to Elie Wiesel
Sara Roy
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 133-134.
Photos
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 135-136.

CENTENNIAL PERSPECTIVE

Palestine and Palestine Studies: One Century after World War I and the Balfour Declaration
Walid Khalidi
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 137-147.

RECENT BOOKS

Review: The Battle for Justice in Palestine
The Battle for Justice in Palestine by by Ali Abunimah
Review by: Richard Falk
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 148-150.
Review: 40 Years of Israeli Occupation: 1967–2007
40 Years of Israeli Occupation: 1967–2007 by by Hiltrud Awad; Hilmi S. Salem; Suhail Khalilieh; Jad Issac
Review by: Ahmad El-Atrash and Lubna Shaheen
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 150-152.
Review: Arab Christians in British Mandate Palestine: Communalism and Nationalism, 1917–1948
Arab Christians in British Mandate Palestine: Communalism and Nationalism, 1917–1948 by Noah Haiduc-Dale
Review by: George Emile Irani
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 152-154.
Review: UNRWA and Palestinian Refugees: From Relief and Works to Human Development
UNRWA and Palestinian Refugees: From Relief and Works to Human Development by edited by Sari Hanafi; Leila Hilal; Lex Takkenberg
Review by: Benjamin Schiff
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 154-156.
Review: Zionism and Land Tenure in Mandate Palestine
Zionism and Land Tenure in Mandate Palestine by by Aida Asim Essaid
Review by: Michael R. Fischbach
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 156-158.
Review: Unfree in Palestine: Registration, Documentation and Movement Restriction
Unfree in Palestine: Registration, Documentation and Movement Restriction by by Nadia Abu-Zahra; Adah Kay
Review by: Roger Heacock
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 158-160.
Review: Memories of Absence: How Muslims Remember Jews in Morocco
Memories of Absence: How Muslims Remember Jews in Morocco by by Aomar Boum
Review by: Sami Shalom Chetrit
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 160-163.
SELECTIONS FROM THE PRESS
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 164-190.
PALESTINE UNBOUND
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 191-203.
UPDATE ON CONFLICT AND DIPLOMACY
Ben White
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 204-237.
DOCUMENTS AND SOURCE MATERIAL
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 238-272.
JPS Responds to Israel’s Prime Minister
Journal of Palestine Studies Autumn 2014, Vol. 44, No. 1: 273-274.

New Article: Davis, Israeli–Palestinian Healthcare Partnerships

Davis, Ryan G. “Israeli–Palestinian Healthcare Partnerships: Advancing Multitrack Peacework After the Arab Spring.” Peace & Change 39.2 (2014): 190-221.

 

URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/pech.12064/abstract

 

Anstract

Israeli–Palestinian cooperation on healthcare initiatives demonstrates the potential for progress toward peace through nongovernmental partnerships while formal government negotiations falter. Health interventions create space for opposing groups to engage peacefully and collaboratively, but disagreement persists about the politicization of humanitarian assistance. Together with other sectors of society, the healthcare community can contribute to achieving and maintaining peace between Israelis and Palestinians as part of a multitrack peacework strategy. The Arab Spring’s revitalization of democracy and civil society throughout the region creates opportunities for broad-based, civilian-motivated movements for change. Drawing on events during the 2008–2009 Gaza War and experiences with various healthcare programs, I describe three mechanisms by which peace can be advanced through health initiatives and review what evidence is available to support this approach.

Reviews: Levy, Israel’s Death Hierarchy

Levy, Yagil. Israel’s Death Hierarchy. Casualty Aversion in a Militarized Democracy. New York: NYU Press, 2012.

 

Reviews

Cite: Kanat, Turkish-Israeli Reset: Business As Usual?

Kanat, Kilic Bugra. “Turkish-Israeli Reset: Business As Usual?” Middle East Policy 20.2 (2013): 113-121.

 

URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/mepo.12024/abstract

 

Abstract

In the absence of a common regional threat and with the ongoing crisis
between Israel and Palestine, when viewed in the context of the changes
in Turkey’s foreign-policy decision making, what can bring about better
relations between the two countries? Although the Obama administration
played a key role in mediating the dispute, third parties can only play a
limited role in the future of Turkish-Israeli relations. With a
changing Turkey and a transitioning Middle East, strong bilateral
relations can perhaps be restored through a revitalization of the peace
process and the emergence of a more integrated Middle Eastern economy.

Reviews: Shlaim, Israel and Palestine

Avi Shlaim. Israel and Palestine: Reappraisals, Revisions, Refutations. London / Brooklyn, NY: Verso, 2009.

9781844676569-frontcover

Reviews

  • Robert Fisk, “Lessons in Justice and Fairness from a No-Nonsense Historian.” The Independent, July 25, 2009.
  • Stephen Sizer, “Review.” Stephen Sizer (blog), July 2009.
  • Michael Rubner, Middle East Policy 17,1 (2010): 157-160.
  • Rafael Behr, “Review.” The Guardian, October 2, 2010.
  • Hisham Khatib. “Review.” British Journal of Middle Eastern Studies 38.2 (2011): 283-4.
  • James L. Gelvin. “Review.” International Journal of Middle East Studies 45.1 (2013): 191-193.

ToC: Israel Affairs 18,3 (2012)

The online platform   for Taylor & Francis Online content

Israel       Affairs, Vol. 18, No. 3, 01 Jul 2012 is now available on Taylor & Francis Online.
This new issue contains the following articles:

Original       Articles
The       war against the Jews
Efraim Karsh
Pages: 319-343
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.689514

The       international assault against Israel
Michael Curtis
Pages: 344-362
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.689515

Attacking       Israel with genocidal intentions
Nidra Poller
Pages: 363-371
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.689517

From       Durban to the Goldstone Report: the centrality of human rights NGOs in       the political dimension of the Arab–Israeli conflict
Gerald M. Steinberg
Pages: 372-388
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.689518

De-legitimization       currents in Europe
Manfred Gerstenfeld
Pages: 389-402
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.689519

A       bias thicker than faith: Christians who punt for their persecutors
Steve Apfel
Pages: 403-411
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.689520

The       BDS message of anti-Zionism, anti-Semitism, and incitement to       discrimination
Joel S. Fishman
Pages: 412-425
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.689521

Jews       at sea: reflections on Israel’s Jewish detractors and defamers
Alvin H. Rosenfeld
Pages: 426-437
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.689522

Jewish       defamation of Israel: roots and branches
Kenneth Levin
Pages: 438-454
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.689523

De-legitimization       of Israel in Palestinian Authority schoolbooks
Arnon Groiss
Pages: 455-484
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.689524

Fighting       on the front lines: anti-Semitism at the University of California and       efforts to combat it
Tammi Rossman-Benjamin
Pages: 485-501
DOI: 10.1080/13537121.2012.689525

New Publication: Meloni and Tognoni, Is There a Court for Gaza

Meloni, Chantal and Gianni Tognoni. Is There a Court for Gaza? A Test Bench for International Justice. The Hague: T. M. C. Asser Press, 2012.

Is there a court for Gaza? : A test bench for international justice

URL: http://www.springerlink.com/content/978-90-6704-819-4

Cite: Stein, Israeli Visuality, Palestinian Testimony and the Gaza War

Stein, Rebecca L. “Impossible Witness: Israeli Visuality, Palestinian Testimony and the Gaza War.” Journal for Cultural Research 16.2-3 (2012): 135-153. [Special Issue: Arab Cultural Studies]

 

URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14797585.2012.647749

 

Abstract

This article studies Israeli news coverage (chiefly via newspapers and television) of the Gaza war of 2008–2009, with a focus on what the national media withheld from its consuming publics – namely, depiction of the extent of Israeli-inflicted violence upon Gazan people and infrastructure. At the core of this article is a study of an anomalous instance of Palestinian testimonial which was broadcast live on Israeli national television – this in an Israeli media context in which Palestinian eyewitness accounts were largely occluded from public view. How, the article asks, are we to make sense of this scene of televised Palestinian trauma and the enormous attention it garnered among Israeli publics? The author’s reading detours through the work of Israeli cultural theorist Ariella Azoulay with her insistence that the study of images and visuality in the Israeli context be attentive to the inextricable interplay between ways of seeing and national ideologies. In conclusion, the author proffers a reading which folds this scene of televised testimonial back into the hegemonic Israeli field of perception.