Dissertation: de la Fontaine, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and War Narratives of Israeli Soldiers

de la Fontaine, Naama, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Social Support and the Role of Ideology as Evident in the War Narratives of Israeli Soldiers. Adelphi University, 2013.

 

URL: http://search.proquest.com/docview/1513380504

 

Abstract

The detrimental effects of war exposure on soldiers’ wellbeing have been documented since the dawn of written narrative. However, the negative impact of trauma, and particularly war trauma, on soldiers’ mental health functioning and wellbeing has historically been overlooked by the psychiatric field at best, and met with antipathy and contempt at worst. This, along with various other social and cultural factors, has shaped the understanding and treatment of veterans for decades. At present, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as well as related mental health difficulties are well recognized as possible outcomes of war exposure among military personnel, yet the role of potential protective and risk factors in this population calls for further exploration. The ongoing rise in political conflict worldwide, along with the large numbers of soldiers impacted by war, emphasizes the need for studies that offer a comprehensive and in-depth understanding of soldiers’ experiences at war and upon homecoming. Israel, a country facing ongoing political turmoil, serves as a paradigm for understanding the complex interaction of personal, cultural, religious, and political factors that are thought to contribute to one’s ability to cope with traumatic events. The current study aimed to contribute to the existing literature documenting the impact of war experience on soldiers’ wellbeing by gaining insight into the lived experiences of soldiers. Specifically, this study sought to examine post-traumatic symptoms and mental health functioning in Israeli veterans of the 2006 Second Lebanon War, assessing participants’ post war mental health functioning, as well as their perception of various potential sources of support and the degree to which social factors played a role in soldiers’ motivation to fight, at-war coping, and adjustment post-war. Given the unique climate of military service in Israel, the study also sought to understand the role of religious, spiritual and political ideologies in motivating soldiers and allowing them to cope with war-related experiences. To this end, participants completed semi-structured interviews targeting these questions. Participants’ narratives were analyzed utilizing a qualitative method of analysis (Le., Consensual Qualitative Research) from which emerged many domains and categories capturing the most frequent topics and content of participants’ responses. Results of the current study captured the most prevalent experiences described by participants. The majority of participants reported experiencing some PTSD symptoms, yet denied feeling anger or irritability. Participants differentiated between various sources of support and most denied that ideologies played a significant role in their war experiences. Social support, and particularly relationships with fellow soldiers, was found to offer greater motivation to fight, and to serve as a greater source of coping both during and after war than did ideological beliefs. Nevertheless, many participants described post war change related to spiritual beliefs and existential growth. These findings are important in guiding clinical intervention for soldiers participate in war. Findings are preliminary and lead to the emergence of a multitude of follow up questions; thus, future research assessing soldiers’ experiences during and following war is warranted.

 

Subject: Mental health; Psychology; Military studies

Classification: 0347: Mental health; 0621: Psychology; 0750: Military studies

Identifier / keyword: Social sciences, Psychology, Health and environmental sciences, trauma, Soldiers, War, Social support, Spirituality, Narratives

Number of pages: 269

Publication year: 2013

Degree date: 2013

School code: 0830

Source: DAI-B 75/06(E), Dec 2014

Place of publication: Ann Arbor

Country of publication: United States

ISBN: 9781303809668

Advisor: Szymanski, Kate

University/institution: Adelphi University, The Institute of Advanced Psychological Studies

University location: United States — New York

Degree: Ph.D.

Source type: Dissertations & Theses

Language: English

Document type: Dissertation/Thesis

Dissertation/thesis number: 3579778

ProQuest document ID: 1513380504

 

Dissertation: Amihay, The Imagetext Turn in the Hebrew Novel

Amihay, Ofra. Migrating Images: The Imagetext Turn in the Hebrew Novel. New York University, 2014.

 

URL: http://search.proquest.com/docview/1518939613

 

Abstract

This dissertation examines the effect of twentieth-century “new media” models on literature, in the form of the late twentieth-century wave of literary works in which visual images play a central poetic role. Demarcating this body of works as an independent cultural turn, I label this “the imagetext turn” thus following two groundbreaking terms coined by W. J. T. Mitchell, “the pictorial turn” and “imagetext.” Based on philosophical discussions regarding the egalitarianism behind text and image hybrids (Benjamin, Rancière, Mitchell), and theories of the democratic nature of the novel (Auerbach, Lukács, Bakhtin) and photography (Sontag, Barthes, Azoulay), I focus on the marriage of novels and photographs. The case study for this exploration is three contemporary Israeli novelists: Yoel Hoffmann, Ronit Matalon, and Michal Govrin. Following a survey of the approach towards the visual image in Modern Hebrew literature, I identify their works as comprising the “imagetext turn” in Hebrew literature while marking their importance within a general literary development, primarily through a comparison to W. G. Sebald’s novels. My study of Hoffmann analyzes the web of Others in his novels through the photographic mechanism of the negative, suggesting the juxtaposition of text and photographs in How Do You Do Dolores echoes the Other behind text, place, and language in all his work. In my analysis of Matalon I discuss the double role photographs play in Matalon’s pursuit of postcolonial ideas in The One Facing Us, operating both as “portable roots” and as “poetic immigrants,” thus offering a subversive reading of reality that undermines nostalgia. Finally I show how through an intricate combination of narrative and visual images Govrin creates in Snapshots a literary representation of both the ideals and the blind spots of the 1990s left-wing movement of secular return to Jewish sources in Israel.

Subject: Comparative literature; Middle Eastern literature; Judaic studies

Classification: 0295: Comparative literature; 0315: Middle Eastern literature; 0751: Judaic studies

Identifier / keyword: Language, literature and linguistics, Social sciences, Hebrew literature, Govrin, Michal, Photography, Matalon, Ronit, Sebald, W. G., Hoffmann, Yoel

Number of pages: 308

Publication year: 2014

Degree date: 2014

School code: 0146

Source: DAI-A 75/07(E), Jan 2015

Place of publication: Ann Arbor

Country of publication: United States

ISBN: 9781303805424

Advisor: Feldman, Yael

Committee member: Hirsch, Marianne; Mann, Barbara E.; Engel, David; Kaplan, Marion

University/institution: New York University

Department: Hebrew and Judaic Studies

University location: United States — New York

Degree: Ph.D.

Source type: Dissertations & Theses

Language: English

Document type: Dissertation/Thesis

Dissertation/thesis number: 3614848

ProQuest document ID: 1518939613

Dissertation: Cohen, Israeli State Violence/Mizrahi Resilience: An Ethnography of Mizrahi Experiences of War and Eviction and Their Intersection with Palestinian Experiences

Cohen, Ilise Benshushan. Israeli State Violence/Mizrahi Resilience: An Ethnography of Mizrahi Experiences of War and Eviction and Their Intersection with Palestinian Experiences. California Institute of Integral Studies, 2013.

 

URL: http://search.proquest.com/docview/1461742758

 

Abstract

Mizrahi Jews have historically been marginalized in Israeli society despite the fact that they make up the majority of Israel’s Jewish population. Through ethnographic research, this study highlights the experiences of Mizrahi Jews around two Mizrahi communities that continue to experience marginalization: Kfar Shalem, a neighborhood in south Tel Aviv that was the site of evictions without compensation in 2007, and Kiryat Shemona, a development town on Israel’s northern border that was directly affected by the second Lebanon war in 2006. Areas of focus of the research include the process of eviction without compensation for Kfar Shalem, the lasting effects of cross-border military conflict in Kiryat Shemona, and the violence produced by these experiences. The research methods utilized included ethnographic interviews, participant observation, archival research, and advocacy. The research participants in Kfar Shalem included Mizrahi families evicted from their homes, lawyers who represented the residents, and Mizrahi activists involved with the community. The research participants in Kiryat Shemona consisted of Mizrahi families who maintained a presence during the war and those who were displaced, and mental health professionals dealing with the effects of the war on residents. I also interviewed two Palestinian citizens of Israel who were able to speak to complex issues of displacement and citizenship. The dissertation frames the ethnographic research in a historical context that includes the U.N. partition of Palestine, Palestinian expulsion/ethnic cleansing, Mizrahi immigration to Israel, and the instrumentalization of Mizrahi Jews being settled in former Palestinian areas. It draws on comparisons between the struggles and ongoing activism of Mizrahi Jews and Palestinians in Israel/Palestine. The findings reveal the complex struggles of Mizrahi identity, discourses of discrimination and internalized oppression, and Mizrahi exposure to physical violence, loss of economic status, and instrumentalization by the state. The findings also highlight meaningful similarities and differences between Mizrahi and Palestinian experiences of state violence and about Mizrahi resilience and agency.

Subject: Cultural anthropology; Middle Eastern Studies; Judaic studies

Classification: 0326: Cultural anthropology; 0555: Middle Eastern Studies; 0751: Judaic studies

Identifier / keyword: Social sciences, State violence, Israel, Discrimination, Mizrahim, Mizrahi-Palestinian alliance, Mizrahi resistance

Number of pages: 567

Publication year: 2013

Degree date: 2013

School code: 0392

Source: DAI-A 75/02(E), Aug 2014

Place of publication: Ann Arbor

Country of publication: United States

ISBN: 9781303480928

Advisor: M’Panya, Mutombo

Committee member: Simons, Shoshana; Shubeli, Rafi

University/institution: California Institute of Integral Studies

Department: Social and Cultural Anthropology

University location: United States — California

Degree: Ph.D.

Source type: Dissertations & Theses

Language: English

Document type: Dissertation/Thesis

Dissertation/thesis number: 3598997

ProQuest document ID: 1461742758

Dissertation: Razon, Citizenship, Science, and Medicine in the Negev/Naqab

Razon, Na’amah. Producing Equality: Citizenship, Science, and Medicine in the Negev/Naqab. University of California, San Francisco, 2013.

 

URL: http://search.proquest.com/docview/1461769531

 

Abstract

In 1994 Israel passed the National Health Insurance Law (NHIL), guaranteeing universal and equal healthcare services to all citizens. Universal healthcare, while unprecedented in Israel, did not have a significant impact on the country’s Jewish majority. Yet for minority citizens such as the Bedouin community in the southern Israel, the NHIL transformed access to medical services, increasing insurance coverage from 60% to 100%, and changing the patient demographic in the regional hospital. Nonetheless, since 1995 when the law was implemented, disparities in health outcomes between Jewish and Arab citizens in the country have widened. Healthcare reform took place within a geo-political landscape that continues to marginalize its Arab citizens. Thus the paradigm of equality of healthcare intersects with national policies that create a differential citizenship in Israel. This dissertation, Producing Equality: Citizenship, Science, and Medicine in the Negev/Naqab , examines the impact of Israel’s National Health Insurance Law as a site to understand how Israel’s policies of inclusion and exclusion of Bedouin Arab citizens become entangled. My work highlights the tensions that exist between expansive and technical medical care that the state allocates to its Bedouin citizens, and the limited financial and political support the Bedouin community receives from the government in other spheres. Healthcare in southern Israel provides an important site to study the active production of the boundaries of citizenship, medicine, and reconfiguring of discrimination. I argue that the emphasis on scientific discourse in the medical arena ignores the social and political problems that place much of the Bedouin community in poor health. Therefore social, political, and historical questions that are central to understanding health disparities in the region remain beyond the scope of what providers view as relevant to their work. This bounding of medical care allows for the continuation of discriminatory policies towards the Bedouin citizens, while permitting the state and healthcare providers to assert they provide equal care to all patients.

Subject: Medical Ethics; Middle Eastern Studies; Public health

Classification: 0497: Medical Ethics; 0555: Middle Eastern Studies; 0573: Public health

Identifier / keyword: Social sciences, Health and environmental sciences, Bedouins, Citizenship, Equality, Israel, National Health Insurance Law, Access to services

Number of pages: 279

Publication year: 2013

Degree date: 2013

School code: 0034

Source: DAI-B 75/02(E), Aug 2014

Place of publication: Ann Arbor

Country of publication: United States

ISBN: 9781303486456

Advisor: Kaufman, Sharon

Committee member: Whitmarsh, Ian, Briggs, Charles

University/institution: University of California, San Francisco

Department: Medical Anthropology

University location: United States — California

Degree: Ph.D.

Source type: Dissertations & Theses

Language: English

Document type: Dissertation/Thesis

Dissertation/thesis number: 3599403

ProQuest document ID: 1461769531

Dissertation: El-Dandarawy, Evaluating the nature of civil military relations in Israel

El-Dandarawy, Obaida A. Evaluating the nature of civil military relations in Israel. Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University, 2010.

 

URL: http://search.proquest.com/docview/861744285

 

Abstract

Noting the unique case study that Israel presents, the following dissertation aims at answering the central research question of whether or not civil military relations in the Israeli state are consistent with that of a liberal-democratic model as Israel is self-described, and whether or not that relationship has changed or evolved over time. The hypothesis adopted at the outset is that civil military dynamics in Israel are not consistent with those of traditional liberal democracies and that Israel’s security concerns, and its particular societal make up has ensured a certain preeminence of the military in politics that goes beyond what would be acceptable in classic liberal democratic models. A two pronged literature review is utilized; the first focusing on civil military relations in general, and the second on Israel specifically. Through the first review a spectrum of civil military relations was plotted and a set of criteria established through which to assess the data collected. The second review provided the necessary understanding and contextual framework within which to evaluate the data on civil military relations taking into account that larger picture of Israeli politics. Three time periods are discussed (1948-1967, 1968-1981, 1982-Present) and researched using the above framework and a particular focus is given to a critical event that occurred within each of the three time periods (1967 War, 1973 War, 1982 Invasion respectively). The final chapter contains the conclusions reached which reaffirm that civil-military relations in Israel are still very much a work in progress.

Subject: Middle Eastern Studies; International Relations; Military studies

Classification: 0555: Middle Eastern Studies; 0601: International Relations; 0750: Military studies

Identifier / keyword: Social sciences, 1967 war, 1973 war, 1982 Lebanon invasion, Civil-military relations, Egypt, Israel

Number of pages: 428

Publication year: 2010

Degree date: 2010

School code: 0930

Source: DAI-A 72/06, Dec 2011

Place of publication: Ann Arbor

Country of publication: United States

ISBN: 9781124556093

Advisor: Shultz, Richard

Committee member: Fawaz, Leila, Hess, Andrew

University/institution: Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy (Tufts University)

Department: Diplomacy, History, and Politics

University location: United States — Massachusetts

Degree: Ph.D.

Source type: Dissertations & Theses

Language: English

Document type: Dissertation/Thesis

Dissertation/thesis number: 3449123

ProQuest document ID: 861744285

Dissertation: Araj, Planning under deep political conflict: The relationship between afforestation planning and the struggle over space in the Palestinian Territories

Araj, Fidaa Ibrahim Mustafa. Planning under deep political conflict: The relationship between afforestation planning and the struggle over space in the Palestinian Territories. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2010.

 

URL: https://www.ideals.illinois.edu/handle/2142/16959

 

Abstract

Struggle over space is at the core of the Palestinian/Israeli conflict. Different actors are involved in this struggle. The Israeli occupation with its planning system, and the Israeli settlers, since the beginning of the occupation, has been enforcing different policies of using space to achieve control over the Palestinians. The Palestinian authority with its planning system under the Israeli policies of control does not have enough power to deal with the different spatial problems that face planning endeavor. Palestinian planners find their autonomy challenged and abilities limited under Israeli policies of control. Among different actors in the spatial struggle in the Palestinian Territories (PT) are Palestinian people who despite their deep suffering from the Israeli policies of control continue making claim to their rights to use space through their spatial practices. Within this complexity of struggle over space in the context of occupation, between actors seeking control and those who resist that control and groups claiming their conflicting rights to the same space, I aim to understand whether and how spatial planning could play a role by understanding the relationship between space, power, and planning. Existing literature is limited in its ability to explain this role. For example, post colonial planning literature, theoretically, addresses the problem of planning as becoming a tool to achieve control. Additionally, radical planning and insurgent planning approaches discuss how in authoritarian political contexts, transformation can be achieved by the engagement of populace in a kind of covert radical or insurgent planning. However, existing literature is mostly focused on conflict between authoritarian state and its citizens, not a state of occupation that involves an occupation of indigenous state and citizens. In order to achieve its goal, the research asks this main question: what is the role of spatial planning in the struggle over space (control and resistance) in the complex context of occupation, and what are the probabilities and the constraints of professional planners’ intervention in such complex context? Since Palestine has a long history of occupation and domination and the phenomenon of the use of planning in the struggle over space in the Palestinian areas is historically rooted, the research takes an historical approach and examines this relationship in two distinct historical colonial periods: the British Mandate in Palestine and the current Israeli occupation. The study hopes to result into conceptual contributions for spatial planning in the PT. The conceptualization of this research will provide an understanding for future studies about planning in cities under deep political conflict such as occupation. It will develop the idea of planning as a form of resistance. The significance of this research lies in its addressing lack of knowledge about planning within the complex context of colonial/occupational areas. It has practical and conceptual contributions. Practically, it documents processes and decisions of planning under occupation. Conceptually, the study contributes to scholarship in planning and political geography by illuminating the spatial practices of different actors in their spatial struggle. To planning scholarship it adds voice to those who have called for an expanded definition of planning. That is planning is not limited to practices of trained professionals. Rather it includes everyday spatial practices of people that are powerful in shaping the space and its territorial control.

Subject: Middle Eastern Studies; Urban planning

 

Classification: 0555: Middle Eastern Studies; 0999: Urban planning

 

Identifier / keyword: Social sciences, Spatial planning, Covert planning, Insurgent planning, Residence planning, Spatial struggle, Radical planning, Palestinian Territories, Afforestation

 

Title: Planning under deep political conflict: The relationship between afforestation planning and the struggle over space in the Palestinian Territories.

 

 

Number of pages: 247

Publication year: 2010

Degree date: 2010

School code: 0090

Source: DAI-A 72/06, Dec 2011

Place of publication: Ann Arbor

Country of publication: United States

ISBN: 9781124580883

Advisor: Miraftab, Faranak

University/institution: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

University location: United States — Illinois

Degree: Ph.D.

Source type: Dissertations & Theses

Language: English

Document type: Dissertation/Thesis

Dissertation/thesis number: 3452051

ProQuest document ID: 863584246

Dissertation: Wallach, Authority, Leadership, and Peacemaking: The Role of the Diasporas

Wallach, Tracy. Authority, Leadership, and Peacemaking: The Role of the Diasporas. A Pilot Study of a Group Relations Conference. Lesley University, 2010.

URL: http://udini.proquest.com/view/authority-leadership-and-goid:862714114/

Abstract

Research suggests that conflicts are much more likely to re-ignite in societies which have large Diaspora communities in the United States. This study examines the role of American Jewish, Arab, and other Middle Eastern Diaspora communities in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, and addresses the generally neglected role of trauma and emotions in perpetuating conflict. The project employed group relations conference methodology to conduct the inquiry. A group relations lens allows one to look at the Israeli-Palestinian conflict at multiple levels: on the psychological level (looking at issues of trauma, identity, collective narrative, emotions and unconscious processes); on the social level (looking at inter-group relations); and on the political level (examining the role of leadership, authority and power dynamics). A pilot conference, Authority, Leadership, and Peacemaking: The Role of the Diasporas was convened April 16-18, 2010. Surveys and interviews were administered before and after the conference in order to examine the impact of the conference on participants. The conference evaluation addressed the following questions: what did participants in the conference learn about the conflict? How did conference participants perceive their individual roles and the collective roles of their respective Diasporas in perpetuating the conflict there? What part might these conferences play in helping participants, as members of their respective Diaspora communities to contribute to the peace process? What processes/variables are at work during the conferences and afterwards that contribute to participant learning and action? The dissertation describes the particular innovations and adaptations made to the group relations conference model; the ways in which the pre-conference and conference dynamics mirrored the dynamics of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict; research design and preliminary findings up to three months post conference. Recommendations for future conferences on the topic are made and implications of the findings for group relations are discussed.

Subject: Middle Eastern Studies; Peace Studies

 

Classification: 0555: Middle Eastern Studies; 0563: Peace Studies

 

Identifier / keyword: Social sciences, Diaspora, Collective narratives, Diaspora(s), Group relations, Inter-group conflict, Israeli-Palestinian Conflict, Peacemaking

Number of pages: 300

Publication year: 2010

Degree date: 2010

School code: 1042

Source: DAI-A 72/06, Dec 2011

Place of publication: Ann Arbor

Country of publication: United States

ISBN: 9781124568669

Advisor: Dallalfar, Arlene

Committee member: Roffman, Eleanor, McRae, Mary

University/institution: Lesley University

Department: School of Education

University location: United States — Massachusetts

Degree: Ph.D.

Source type: Dissertations & Theses

Language: English

Document type: Dissertation/Thesis

Dissertation/thesis number: 3449521

ProQuest document ID: 862714114

Dissertation: McCLure, ELL Parent Involvement of Recent Immigrants from Israel, Russia, and Uzbekistan

McClure, Noel M. ELL Parent Involvement of Recent Immigrants from Israel, Russia, and Uzbekistan. Jones International University, 2011.

 

URL: http://udini.proquest.com/view/ell-parent-involvement-of-recent-pqid:2336119021/

Abstract

Abstract: The purpose of this research is to determine successful ways schools, teachers, and classrooms can effectively foster partnerships with parents of English language learners who are recent immigrants from Russia, Uzbekistan, and Israel. As schools struggle to overcome institutional bias and lack of understanding of how to accommodate the needs of the growing population of immigrant students from diverse countries, immigrant parents also struggle to fit into a new cultural environment and to secure the best education for their children. This qualitative study was conducted in one school in Phoenix, Arizona. Through interviews with ten parents of English language learners and nine teachers of ELL students, this research provides information about the barriers and opportunities that teachers and parents of English language learners faced in improving academic success for English language students who were children of immigrants. The findings and conclusions consist of the following: (a) schools and parents must communicate well in order to develop into a team that supports the students, (b) schools may need to provide additional resources to ELL teachers and parents in order to support the students, and (c) school cultures may need to change through cultural trainings and signage in order to become more welcoming toward ELL parents. This work is limited by the fact that it was completed in only one school with a narrow population. The information gathered here informs the discussion in schools regarding ways that school leaders and teachers can work more effectively with immigrant parents to support in the home the academic goals of English language students. Key search terms: English Language Learners, immigrant parents, school-parent communication, school-family connection, Bukharian students.

Subject: English as a Second Language; Multicultural Education; Judaic studies

Classification: 0441: English as a Second Language; 0455: Multicultural Education; 0751: Judaic studies

Identifier / keyword: Education, Social sciences, Bukharian, ELL, ESL, Parent involvement, Recent immigrants, School-parent communication, English as a second language, Israeli, Russian, Uzbek

Number of pages: 297

Publication year: 2011

Degree date: 2011

School code: 1590

Source: DAI-A 72/06, Dec 2011

Place of publication: Ann Arbor

Country of publication: United States

ISBN: 9781124591469

Advisor: Hargiss, Kathleen

Committee member: Howard, Caroline, Orth, Judith

University/institution: Jones International University

Department: School of Education

University location: United States — Colorado

Degree: Ed.D.

Source type: Dissertations & Theses

Language: English

Document type: Dissertation/Thesis

Dissertation/thesis number: 3450476

ProQuest document ID: 864579837

Dissertation: Katan, Language Socialization and Linguistic Ideologies among Israeli Emissaries in the United States

Language socialization and linguistic ideologies among Israeli emissaries in the United States

 

Author: Kattan, Shlomy

 

Publication info: University of California, Berkeley, ProQuest, UMI Dissertations Publishing, 2010. 3413403.

 

http://pitt.idm.oclc.org/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/749359605?accountid=14709

 

Abstract: Research in both the anthropology and sociology of education has increasingly come to consider the institutional effects of migration, globalization, and transnationalism on learning environments. Yet, most studies examining transmigration and education have only looked at migrant children in schools rather than at the transitions they undergo as transnationals across settings. We know little of the linguistic and socializing practices that occur during migrants’ transitions from place to place and how they come to define the migratory and educational experience for transnational children. This multi-sited, global ethnography examines language socialization practices and linguistic ideologies among families of Israeli emissaries ( shlichim ) employed by the Jewish Agency for Israel (JAFI). The study documented the transitions undergone by families with school-age children in the months of their preparation for their move from Israel to the United States and during the first year and-a-half in the U.S.. Data collection for this project took place in both Israel and New York at the homes of the families, the children’s schools, peer group activities, extracurricular programs, play, and summer camp. The focus of this dissertation project is on routine home and school practices which orient children to attitudes towards their identities as Israelis, as Zionists, as transnationals, and as temporary residents of the United States. The study approaches this question through the lens of the language socialization paradigm, a subfield of linguistic anthropology which understands socialization to occur both through the use of language and to the use of language. I argue that through attention to language use and form children are taught to attend to symbolic boundaries between Israeli, Jewish Diasporan, and U.S. American identities. The simultaneous reinforcement and transcendence of these symbolic boundaries is a defining characteristic of living transnationally. I find that transnational identities: (1) Are constructed through an explicit recognition of the boundaries between the linguistic and cultural practices of the homeland and the host country; (2) are negotiated through attention to the authenticity of members of the homeland, the host country, and the transnational community; that is, through attention to the extent to which individuals stay within the symbolic boundaries that separate the homeland and the host-land; and (3) Display an ambivalence toward affiliation with the host country by accentuating and emphasizing the linguistic and cultural practices of the homeland. Based on these findings, I call for a language socialization approach to studying transnationalism which recognizes the role of the local and the global, the contemporary and the historical, and the orthodox and heterodox in everyday transnational practices. By focusing on the shlichim ‘s transition from Israel to the United States, the dissertation obtains a view of migration often unavailable to researchers: the preparation for departure and initial arrival to the country of destination. This period of transition is formative in the emissaries’ experiences and as they define themselves vis-à-vis their country of origin and their host country. In this sense, this dissertation contributes to an understanding of the role of language in transnational practices, thus supplementing the growing field of research around questions of transnationalism, diaspora, and identity.

 

 

Subject: Linguistics; Cultural anthropology; Educational sociology

Classification: 0290: Linguistics; 0326: Cultural anthropology; 0340: Educational sociology

Identifier / keyword: Education, Social sciences, Language, literature and linguistics, Language socialization, Ideologies, Israeli, Emissaries, Diaspora, Identity, Israel, Shlichut, Symbolic boundaries,; Transnationalism

Title: Language socialization and linguistic ideologies among Israeli emissaries in the United States

Number of pages: 144

Publication year: 2010

Degree date: 2010

School code: 0028

Source: DAI-A 71/09, Mar 2011

Place of publication: Ann Arbor

Country of publication: United States

ISBN: 9781124140995

Advisor: Baquedano-Lopez, Patricia

Committee member: Kramsch, Claire J., Boyarin, Daniel

University/institution: University of California, Berkeley

Department: Education

University location: United States — California

Degree: Ph.D.

Source type: Dissertations & Theses

Language: English

Document type: Dissertation/Thesis

Dissertation/thesis number: 3413403

ProQuest document ID: 749359605

Dissertation: Wehrenfennig, Citizen Dialogue in Northern Ireland and Israel/Palestine

Wehrenfennig, Daniel. The Missing Link: Citizen Dialogue in Northern Ireland and Israel/Palestine. Irvine: University of California, Irvine, 2009.

 

Abstract

The past three decades have brought major changes in the conflicts in Northern Ireland and Israel/Palestine. While both have had a peace process, Northern Ireland seems farther on its way to sustainable peace; Israel/Palestine is far away from it. Though both conflicts and peace processes have been intensively studied, the factor of citizen dialogue in these processes of change is a missing link that has hardly been explored.

This thesis is based upon extensive theoretical work. It assumes that citizen dialogue plays an important role in peacebuilding and that it can at least partially account for the different outcomes in the cases studied.

Hypothesizing that citizen dialogue is more likely to succeed in bringing peaceful change when it is: ongoing over a longer period of time, proactive and strategic in nature, and integrates various civil society and grassroots actors/groups into a peace constituency that is linked with the political decision-making process. To explore this hypothesis, 125 comparative field interviews with academic experts, participants and practitioners of citizen dialogue were personally conducted in Northern Ireland and Israel/Palestine.

These interviews are further supported by secondary interviews and material. The thesis concludes that indeed citizen dialogue took place very differently in both situations over time, though the cases had similar contextual circumstances at some points (e.g. the early 1990’s). In particular, the ongoing, linking and strategic qualities of the citizen dialogue processes as a whole were lacking in quality in the Israel/Palestine context. Citizen dialogue between Israelis and Palestinians in general are short term or frequently interrupted, limiting their trust-building impact. There are missing links between the political elites and civil society and grassroots actors in Israel/ Palestine and citizen dialogue processes generally lack a long-term strategic perspective. This leads to a suboptimal outcome of citizen dialogue and limits its impact for peacebuilding. In contrast, in Northern Ireland the long-term sustained relationships carried the peace process forward and the linkages between the official and unofficial levels became of major importance. In addition, strategies of key civil society actors and major funders to build peace capacities within and between each group paid off in the long-term.

Dissertation: Makov-Hasson, Narrating Gender and Nation in the Early Novels of Israeli Women

Makov-Hasson, Hadar. Oedipus’ Sister: Narrating Gender and Nation in the Early Novels of Israeli Women. New York: New York University, 2009.

 

Abstract

This dissertation follows the emergence of the first novels to be written by women in Israel after 1948. Largely ignored until now, the corpus of the female interwar novelists [1948-1966] consists of more than twenty novels which offer a diverse and innovative engagement with questions of gender and nation. The dissertation presents a reading of six such novels, framed within a discussion of the writers’ choice of genre, a highly uncommon venue for women writers during that time.

The main argument of this dissertation is that women novelists of the suggested period proposed alternative interpretations to the prevailing Zionist meta-narrative which dominated Hebrew male-centered literature. By employing strategies of appropriation and subversion, these writers have managed to portray alternative protagonists with different trajectories.

The six novels analyzed in the dissertation are closely read through the lenses of various theories. First, theories of the novel are explored in an examination of the chosen genre and the unique possibilities of resistance it offers. Next, the novels are read in conjunction with feminist and postcolonial theories as a means to highlight their moments of interruption of the national narrative, and as a tool to recognize and explain strategies of resistance and defiance.

My reading reveals that while often adopting canonized poetics, the female interwar novelists use this form of appropriation as a cover up for their subversive content. Offering marginal protagonists, both women and men, they reread the national narrative by either foregrounding feminine and artistic coming-of-age stories that defy stereotypical gender roles, or by exposing the ruptures within the model of national manhood through the exploration of male protagonists and their nationalized masculinity.

This dissertation presents a two-fold contribution to the field of modern Hebrew literature. First, it adds a "missing link" to the story of women’s writing, exposing a continuity that contradicts previous depictions of this writing as sporadic and mostly marginal. Second, it rattles prevalent perceptions of the literary canon, revealing how its so-called margins managed to infiltrate and undermine the ruling literary norms of the time, while anticipating some of Israel’s most prominent literary works.

Dissertation: Levinson, The End of the Founding Zionist Dream

Levinson, Rose L. The End of the Founding Zionist Dream: Reflections in Contemporary Israeli Fiction. Cincinnati: Union Institute and University, 2009.

 

Abstract

This dissertation explores dilemmas of contemporary Israeli culture through the work of four Israeli novelists: Yoram Kaniuk, Orley Castel-Bloom, Michal Govrin and Zeruya Shalev. The focus is on how these artists provide insight into vexing political, communal and individual situations in Israeli society. Using literature as cultural artifacts through which Israeli life is revealed, the research focuses on key aspects in which modern-day Israel is radically different from the state envisioned by its founding pioneers just over sixty years ago. The eight novels of the study–two by each author–are the basis for considering such issues as the role of religion and biblical text in contemporary Israeli life, particularly as they impact women; the nature of Israeli domestic life as it reflects larger issues of social unrest; the ongoing influence of the Holocaust in determining political and personal responses to perceived danger; and the use of satire as a means of examining dysfunction in Israeli institutions. The fictive worlds of the novels reveal a society deeply fragmented, one in which once familiar structures are breaking apart under the stresses and confusion of newly emerging challenges.

Autoethnography is included in the methodology. The inclusion of an autobiographical element draws attention to the impact Israeli issues have on a non-Israeli Jew for whom this country remains a strong embodiment of core aspects of Jewish identity. This Cultural Study of Jewish Israel links questions of Israeli Jewish identity to issues of Jewish identity in general. The autobiographical elements are used as a bridge between the novelists’ insights and the preoccupations of individuals seeking to grapple with perplexities around identity by studying Israeli cultural maladies through its storytellers.

Dissertation: Lainer-Vos, Irish and Zionist Transatlantic Networks

Lainer-Vos, Dan. Nationalism in Action: The Construction of Irish and Zionist Transatlantic National Networks

 

Proquest Dissertations And Theses 2008. Section054, Part 0626 421 pages; [Ph.D. dissertation].

United States — New York: Columbia University; 2008.

Publication Number: AAT 3373778.

 

***** Abstract (Summary) *****

This dissertation treats nation building as a practical organizational accomplishment. It examines encounters between Irish Americans and Jewish Americans and their respective homelands to understand how national movements establish cooperation between the different "fragments" that constitute the nation.

Part One introduces the theoretical framework. Part Two examines a technology developed to secure financial resources for the nation. It compares and contrasts the Irish and Israeli attempts to float national bonds in the US in 1920 and 1951 respectively. Sold as a mixture of a gift and an investment, the Irish bond drive aggravated the relationship between Irish and Irish Americans.

The Israeli bond, on the other hand, combining similar elements, was instrumental in establishing cooperation. It functioned as a boundary object thereby nourishing cooperation without consensus. The comparison highlights the importance of organizational technologies for the making of nations.

Part Three explores the technologies developed to secure national attachments in the diaspora. Specifically, it examines the construction of national attachments in "Massad," a Jewish American summer camp, and an Irish American Gaelic Athletic Association. Attempting to endow diasporic subjects with a sense of belonging, national entrepreneurs constructed these sites as liminal places. In the Jewish case, "Massad" functioned as a simulation of Zionism.

This simulation allowed campers to believe that others, in Israel, experience wholesome national belonging. In the Irish case, the means to secure national attachments was competition. The regulation of matches generated a sense of friendly rivalry among teams representing different counties thereby fostering a sense of Irishness.

Studying nationalism as a practical accomplishment highlights the role of concrete organizational technologies in regulating relationships between the groups that make up the nation. Diversity within the nation is not necessarily an obstacle to nation building. Rather, the crux of nation building is the orchestration of difference. Nation building does not rely on the existence of taken-for-granted categories but on the establishment of cooperation without consensus. The concept of simulation clarifies that national subjects do not necessarily ignore or discount the importance of internal differences. Rather, national simulations allow subjects to make sense of their difference from within the nation.

Dissertation: Sinanoglou, British Plans for Partition of Palestine

Sinanoglou, Penelope Joy. Playing Solomon: British plans for the partition of Palestine, 1920-1939. Ph.D. dissertation. Harvard University; 2008.

***** Abstract (Summary) *****

This dissertation traces the emergence and development of partition plans in British-mandated Palestine from the inception of the mandate until the eve of the Second World War. It seeks to determine how the British eventually came to favor partition as a solution to the "Palestine problem" and to delineate the factors influencing this trajectory. Drawing on archival and published sources collected in England, India, Israel and the United States, the dissertation traces local, national, imperial and international influences on British policy-making. The aborted post-war partition of Palestine under the United Nations has drawn significant scholarly attention away from a period in which partition was not inevitable, but rather slowly emerged as a seemingly promising solution. This dissertation reveals the complex web of factors that brought partition to the fore.

The dissertation brings Britain and international organizations such as the League of Nations back to a central position in the early twentieth-century history of Palestine, arguing that ideas about nationality, sovereignty and territoriality that were being defined and contested after 1919 had a significant impact on British policy in Palestine. Representative government was increasingly recognized and constructed as a norm in both British domestic and international politics, yet Britain was unable to institute nationally representative government in Palestine. The dissertation argues that partition emerged as a potential policy because it offered a solution to this intractable problem.

Critically, this study also returns Palestine to the fold of British imperial history from which it has often been excluded as an exceptional case. It foregrounds the importance of cross-imperial experience and thinking in the development of partition as a theory and practice. Many British administrators looked to analogous situations in other parts of the empire such as India, Ireland, and Africa for solutions to problems in Palestine. By the mid-1920s, partition was already an established imperial tool, used temporarily in Bengal between 1905 and 1911, and permanently in the Irish partition of 1922. Placing British policy-making in Palestine in these international and imperial contexts provides a new and nuanced interpretation of a critical historical moment.

***** Indexing (document details) *****

Advisor:          Owen, Roger

School:           Harvard University

School Location:  United States — Massachusetts

Keyword(s):       Great Britain, Partition, British Empire, Palestine

Source:           DAI-A 69/10, Apr 2009

Source type:      Dissertation

Subjects:         Middle Eastern history, European history

Publication       AAT 3334795

Number:

ISBN:             9780549882299

Document URL:     http://proquest.umi.com/

                  pqdweb?did=1617307351&Fmt=2&clientId=17454&RQT=309&VName=PQD

ProQuest document 1617307351

 

Keywords: Israel-Palestinian Conflict; Penelope Joy Sinanoglou, British Mandate,

[Thanks to John Erlen, University of Pittsburgh for info]

Dissertation: Florette Cohen, The New Anti-Semitism Israel Model

Cohen, Florette.  The New Anti-Semitism Israel Model: Empirical Tests. Ph.D. dissertation. Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey – New Brunswick. 2008.

***** Abstract (Summary) *****

Anti-Semitism is resurgent throughout much of the world. A new theoretical model of anti-Semitism is presented and tested in three experiments. The New Anti-Semitism Israel (NASI) model proposes that mortality salience increases anti-Semitism and that anti-Semitism often manifests as hostility towards Israel. Study 1 showed that mortality salience led to greater levels of anti-Semitism and higher levels of delegitimization toward Israel. This effect occurred only in a bogus pipeline condition for anti-Semitism, indicating that social desirability masks hostility towards Jews, but not for delegitimization toward Israel. Study 2 showed that mortality salience in conjunction with a bogus pipeline manipulation increased perceived justification for offensive political cartoons of Israel but not China. In Study 3 mortality salience was sufficient to increase anti-Semitism when the anti-Semitism scale was integrated in a general assessment questionnaire. Collectively, results suggest that Jews constitute a unique cultural threat to many people’s worldviews, and that anti-Semitism and hostility to Israel are related.

***** Indexing (document details) *****

Advisor:           Jussim, Lee

School:            Rutgers The State University of New Jersey – New Brunswick

Department:        Psychology, General

School Location:   United States — New Jersey

Keyword(s):        Anti-Semitism, Prejudice, Israel, Mortality salience, Modern

                   prejudice, Terror management theory, New Anti-Semitism

                   Israel

Source:            DAI-B 69/10, Apr 2009

Source type:       Dissertation

Subjects:          Social psychology

Publication        AAT 3335523

Number:

ISBN:              9780549889588

Keywords: Israel-Palestinian Conflict; Florette Cohen, Antisemitism, Anti-Israel, Israel in the Media

[Thanks to John Erlen, University of Pittsburgh for info]

Dissertation: Atalia Omer, How Does the Israeli Peace Camp Think about Religion, Nationalism and Justice?

Omer, Atalia. After Peace: How Does the Israeli Peace Camp Think about Religion, Nationalism and Justice? Ph.D. dissertation. Harvard University. 2008.

***** Abstract (Summary) *****

The dissertation analyzes the Israeli peace camp and how positions on the questions of the interrelation between religion and nationality relate to the interpretations of justice vis-à-vis the Palestinian predicament. The dissertation studies the ‘visions of peace’ and the ‘visions of citizenship’ articulated by groups as diverse as Peace Now, Gush Shalom, Netivot Shalom, Rabbis for Human Rights, the Israeli- Palestinian Balad political party and the Mizrahi Democratic Rainbow. By drawing on recent scholarship which attempted to link ‘peace’ and ‘justice’ in a meaningful way, this work devises a set of dynamic criteria with which to evaluate each peace platform and its respective interpretation of justice. Challenging the modernist-secularist inclination to interpret ‘nationalism’ as a ‘religion surrogate’ or a structural analogue of religion, the underpinning theoretical point is that religion and nationalism are intricately related and thus cannot be viewed as dichotomous or antithetical. Hence, religious sources, vocabularies, institutions and leadership may function centrally in devising interpretations of culturally embedded secularity in zones of ethnonational contestations –a process which is referred to in this dissertation as the hermeneutics of citizenship.

Likewise, the dissertation emphasizes the critical importance of rearticulating subaltern voices and histories as a central dimension of conflict transformation and peacebuilding efforts. It accomplishes that by highlighting the counter-hegemonic cases of the Mizrahim (the "Arab Jews") and that of Palestinian-Israelis. Both the effort to centralize subaltern counter-narratives (including those of internal victims) and the insistence on the irreducibility of ‘religion’ to ‘nation’ suggest creative potentialities for thinking about questions of peace and justice in contexts of ethnoreligious national conflicts.

The dissertation further argues that the new field of inquiry and practice of ‘religion in peacebuilding’ overlooks the importance of introspecting the nexus between religion, nationalism and ethnicity as articulated and reproduced in zones characterized by ethnonational conflicts. This critique derives from this work’s recognition of (1) the persistent role of religion in the processes of imagining and reimagining the nation as suggested in Anthony Smith’s work on nationalism, (2) the potentially transformative and liberalizing role of ‘state’ institutions in moving away from exclusivist interpretations of nationhood toward increased inclusivity which, according to Anthony Marx’s study, has been the case in western Europe, (3) David Little and Scott Appleby’s notion of the ambivalence of the sacred and the irreducibility of the resources of religion to interpretations of nationalism, despite what might be suggested by nationalist rhetoric and (4) ongoing theoretical conversations which have challenged modernist interpretations of the ‘secular’ as representing the absence or diminishing presence of religion and as subsequently implying a neutral public sphere.

The central contention that emerges out of this scrutiny of the Israeli peace camp is that a just peace to the Palestinian-Israeli conflict would necessitate (1) recognizing Zionism as a root cause of conflict and (2) partaking in a process of reimagining alternative interpretations of the ‘nation’, understood as a ‘political theology’. The two cases of the new Mizrahi discourse and of the Palestinian citizens of Israel were presented in order to underscore (1) why the ideology of Zionism may be viewed as a root cause of the conflict and (2) the structural and ideological interconnectedness between the broader Palestinian-Israeli conflict and questions of social justice within Israel proper, (3) the importance of exploring and reclaiming subaltern counter-narratives in the process of introspecting and reimagining the national ethos,(4) the creative and empowering effectiveness of post-colonial and post-modern theoretical insights in de-naturalizing national claims and perceptions and (5) the relevance of international human rights conventions and theories of multiculturalism to thinking locally through the problem of peace and justice.

***** Indexing (document details) *****

Advisor:          Little, David

School:           Harvard University

School Location:  United States — Massachusetts

Keyword(s):       Religion and nationalism, Religion and peace, Religion and

                  conflict, Conflict transformation, Peace-building, Israeli-

                  Palestinian conflict, Religion, Nationalism, Justice

Source:           DAI-A 69/10, Apr 2009

Source type:      Dissertation

Subjects:         Religion, Middle Eastern history, Ethnic studies

Publication       AAT 3334832

Number:

ISBN:             9780549884880

Document URL:     http://proquest.umi.com/

                  pqdweb?did=1617355791&Fmt=2&clientId=17454&RQT=309&VName=PQD

ProQuest document 1617355791

ID:

Keywords: Israel-Palestinian Conflict; Peace Process, Atalia Omer, Zionism, Post-Colonialism, Human Rights, Religion, Justice, Nationalism, Patriotism

[Thanks to John Erlen, University of Pittsburgh for info]